Riding jeans

If the Google machine dropped you directly on this page without seeing the introduction to MO’s Massive Riding Jeans Buyer’s Guide, and you are confused as to what’s going on, you should click here to read the introduction and the full listing of jeans. If you’re the adventurous type who just wants to jump to our individual reviews of 34 pairs of jeans, the Table of Contents below will only give you a direct link to jeans on this page. So, we still recommend that you go to the introduction. There’s a lot of good info to cover.

MO Tested: Massive Riding Jeans Buyer’s Guide – Introduction

Alpinestars Barton

I’m either getting old or just being fashionable. I think I’ll pretend it’s the latter, but man, these cargo pockets are really convenient! The Barton jeans from Alpinestars definitely come in on the more fashion oriented side with the only protective bit being the Bio Flex knee armor (which you can also get for the hips). Some of the edges are lightly distressed and the denim has a slight patina to it. There is also an extra layer of denim at the seat.

Perhaps because these are just jeans with knee armor basically, they’re extremely comfortable. The denim is soft and the fit is spot on for swinging a leg over any motorcycle, no matter how big or tall it is. The inseam measured at 32.5 inches.

Alpinestars Compass Pro

The Compass Pro jeans are meant to be somewhat of a touring version of riding jeans. Features like the waist connection zipper, zippers at the hems, and water-resistant Hydro treatment all point to this. Compared to the other Alpinestars jeans here, I would call the fit “regular” and with the amount of stretch (which is substantial) in the Cordura denim and other stretch panels, they’re very comfortable.

My only issue with the fit is that the inseam is really long, even compared to the other Astars jeans. This also means the knee armor is slightly lower than I would prefer even in the higher of the two positions. Speaking of the knee armor, the super flexible Nucleon Flex Plus armor is easy to forget that it’s even there. I like the black colorway on these because the stretch panels and Astars branding is more subdued than the blue.

Alpinestars Copper Pro

The Copper riding jean has been a staple of Alpinestars technical denim for some time now and has gone through multiple refreshes along the way. This latest version ups the comfort thanks to the stretch Cordura and pre-curved cut of the legs. The Copper Pro has a regular/tapered fit. Between the Astars jeans reviewed here, the Copper is a bit more snug than the Compass, but offers slightly more room than the other two.

In terms of protection, the Copper has your a** covered. From the Cordura denim backed with aramid panels in key areas, to the flexible Nucleon and Bio-flex armor, the amount of protective qualities in this garment is about as good as it gets from Alpinestars. Inseam measured at 33.5 inches.

Alpinestars Diesel AS-DSL Daiji

Continuing the fashionable trend – and an ongoing partnership that has produced some unique gear from jeans to jackets – Alpinestars and high-end jean designer Diesel have collaborated to bring us the AS-DSL Daiji.

The Daiji is made from super soft stretch denim and has aramid panels in key impact areas like the seat and knees and comes with Astar’s Nucleon knee armor (hip armor pockets can also accept optional armor). These are the softest and most comfortable jeans that I’ve tested here. The Barton would be a close second, but doesn’t provide as much abrasion resistance. The inseam measured at 33 inches on these which makes them easy to wear cuffed or not for me and my 30-inch inseam. The Daiji is also precurved for extra comfort on the bike and has some stitching that wraps around from the front to the back around the knees that shows this. If comfort and style is key, Diesel and Alpinestars have you covered with the Daiji.

Alpinestars Stella Courtney

These feel and fit like your favorite worn-in skinny jean, though with the added panels of Aramid abrasion resistant fabric, they lend a bit more protection than your Levi’s. The knee armor pocket is adjustable for those who may be shorter or taller than average, and the fabric feels light and breezy while riding in the sun.

I feel like these blend seamlessly into my rotation of motorcycle jeans that get worn out and about and are an easy choice on some of the hotter riding days.

Alpinestars Stella Angeles Denim Jeans

These are a classic blue jean, and while you cant go wrong with the cut, I was hoping for the reinforced lining found in other AlpineStars jeans, specifically in the seat of the pants. These are the lowest rise of the sampled jeans and had a decent amount of stretch to the Cordura.

The included knee armor was soft and flexible, and though visibly flattening across the front of the knee while standing, it molded to the shape of the bend while riding the bike.

Atwyld Backroads Moto Jeans

These are lightweight, hip, and so soft you’d swear they’re already broken in! Breathable single layer means high temps are more than bearable on the bike, and the high waist and deep pockets keep you fashionable and practical no matter where your ride takes you.

Easily has taken one of the top spots on my daily riding gear list, and just recently went cross country with me earlier this summer.

Bull-It Covert Evo Slim Jeans

Another single layer jean infused with Bull-It’s own proprietary Covec material from top to bottom (not just in impact zones) for abrasion resistance worthy of a AA rating up to 75kph. The Covec material also has lower thermal conductivity, reducing the chances of friction burns. The slim fit is true to the name, so I’m glad the stretch material is very stretchy so I can move around both on and off the bike.

Still, the slim fit limits my movement when really trying to get my lower body off the bike for spirited riding. It’s also a problem on ADV bikes with tall seats and wide tanks, making it hard to splay my legs enough to get a foot on the ground. Bull-It jeans are sold in the US without armor for a lower price point, but also resulting in a AA rating. The pockets for the armor are available, and if purchased separately will equal the cost of the jeans in Europe, where they are sold already installed in the jeans for a AAA rating. Nice jeans, but the slim fit isn’t my style.

Bull-It Mens Onyx Black Slim

Another single layer jean infused with Bull-It’s own proprietary Covec material from top to bottom (not just in impact zones) for abrasion resistance worthy of a AA rating up to 75kph. The slim fit is true to the name, so I’m glad the stretch material is very stretchy so I can move around both on and off the bike. Still, the slim fit is too tight for me to truly move around freely during a canyon run. Bull-It jeans are sold in the US without armor for a lower price point, but also resulting in a AA rating.

The pockets for the armor are available, and if purchased separately will equal the cost of the jeans in Europe, where they are sold already installed in the jeans for a AAA rating. Overall, the Bull-It jeans seem like well-made denim, but the slim fit is simply not my taste. I have a hard time seeing myself wearing these going forward.



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