2018 Ducati Panigale V4

Editor Score: 93.5%
Engine 20/20
Suspension/Handling 15/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.5/10
Brakes 10/10
Instruments/Controls5.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.0/10
Appearance/Quality 9.0/10
Desirability 9.5/10
Value 7.5/10
Overall Score93.5/100

We just returned from the launch of Ducati’s all-new Panigale V4, and it’s no exaggeration to describe it as one of the best sportbikes ever made, perhaps even the best. Its new four-cylinder engine is melodious and powerful, it handles with agility akin to a much smaller bike, its electronics are leading-edge and fully customizable, and it looks sensational in person.

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Ducati says the Panigale V4 is the biggest investment the company has ever made in a single product, four years in development, and that claim is perfectly believable after riding the bike at the Ricardo Tormo circuit in Spain. Here, in bite-sized chunks, is why its technology and performance will take the superbike class by storm. Don’t be surprised if it takes top honors in sportbike shootouts around the world in 2018.

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2017 Superbike Shootout

The rakish Ducati Panigale V4, setting new sportbike standards.

1. Ultra Performance

Perhaps you might think I’m just a victim of drinking Ducati Kool-aid after a fun trip to Spain, but doubting Thomases should be persuaded by lap times. The fastest race lap aboard a Ducati MotoGP racebike during the 2017 Valencia GP was Andrea Dovizioso clocking a 1:31.78. Alessandro Valia, Ducati’s development rider, lapped 5 scant seconds slower (1:36.84) aboard the Panigale V4 streetbike!

Keep in mind that Valia, although rippin’ fast, isn’t in the same league, literally, as GP-winner Dovi. Also, this is on a production bike with headlights and other street equipment, even if it was fitted with the accessory Akrapovic exhaust and Pirelli SC1 Superbike slicks.

Valia tearing around the track, enjoying the grip from a taller and improved 200/60-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP and Ducati Wheelie Control EVO with “higher-precision” to allow wheelies with less abrupt intervention. Loft heights near this are available in DWC 3, which proved to be slightly quicker around the track than DWC 2, that sometimes required closing the throttle to keep the front tire down and steering.

To illustrate how fast the Panigale V4 can burn up a GP track, take a look at the video below. Also take note of how frequently the amber light on the top-left portion of the instruments illuminates to indicate traction-control interventions. Then tell us again how you believe a rider can go quicker without “nannying” electronic aids.

2. Engine-eering

Ducati pushed its engineering and marketing efforts to the limits with this new Stradale V4 motor. It required considerable cojones to abandon its legacy of V-Twin engines in favor of a MotoGP-inspired V-4 powerplant. Common to both Ducatis (GP and Stradale) is the 90-degree V-4 engine arrangement and “Twin Pulse” firing order, in which the two left-side cylinders and two right-side ones fire closely together. Even seasoned ears can be fooled into thinking the Stradale V4 sounds at idle like a typical Duc Twin. But letting the potent motor climb up to its 14,500-rpm redline reveals a roaring howl that is a near duplicate of Ducati’s MotoGP machine, supplanting the signature V-Twin boom that has been a hallmark of the Italian brand since superbike racing was created.

The compact nature of the Stradale V4 in the foreground is evident next to the the MotoGP mill behind it. The V-4 is smaller and easier to package than the former 1199/1299 Superquadro V-Twin, even if it weighs about 5 pounds extra, at 143 pounds. Grams are saved by using lightweight magnesium for engine covers and the sump.

3. Engine Room

Also shared is the engines’ 81mm bore size, but the Stradale V4 uses a longer stroke (53.5mm) that yields a total displacement of 1103cc. Yes, it’s a cheater motor in the literbike class. (A 999cc R version is on deck for the 2019 season to fit Superbike racing regulations.)

So, it should be no surprise that Ducati’s claim of 214 crankshaft horsepower is greater than any of the class’ 1000cc competitors, including the 199-hp stated by BMW for the S1000RR and the 1299’s 197 ponies. The big motor’s 91.1 lb-ft of torque at 10,000 rpm claim also vanquishes any literbike. Trackday enthusiasts will want to opt for the titanium Akrapovic accessory exhaust system, which sounds awesome and boosts power by 12 horses to a mad 226.

With three riding modes and individual adjustments for electronic rider aids, the Panigale V4 offers a power delivery to suit any rider, from docile and smooth to hairy and fierce.

The S-V4 tore around the Valencia circuit with a ferocious vigor, piling on speed at a pace similar to the lightweight carbon-framed BMW HP4 Race I rode a few months ago, which claimed a similar peak hp figure of 215 ponies. The Duc perhaps has a smoother powerband, thanks to its extra displacement and employment of variable-length throttle body intakes. Despite the high output, valve-inspection intervals are suggested at a reasonable 15,000 miles.

More Panigale V4 Details In MO’s Preview

4. Going Backward To Move Forward

The new engine also employs the relatively novel trick of the MotoGP Desmosedici’s reverse-rotating crankshaft, which offsets some of an engine’s negative gyroscopic effect on steering responses. This is an arrangement used in Ducati’s GP bikes since 2010, and its effectiveness of providing beneficial agility is veritable because all other MotoGP teams use it – despite sapping 1% of power. That’s because a jackshaft is required for reversing rotation again to the countershaft sprocket.

The effectiveness of this arrangement was readily apparent when riding around Valencia, as the Panigale V4 tipped into corners with the ease of a much smaller-engined sportbike. It exhibits a friendly neutral balance and is easier to ride than the more finicky 1299. It’s both willing and cooperative.

The Panigale V4 has sharp turn-in responses yet feels planted at deep lean angles. Agility on the S version we tested is aided by new forged aluminum wheels that are lighter than the old 1299’s forged hoops. The regular Panigale uses cast wheels. The standard-equipment Pirelli Supercorsa SPs supply plenty of stick; check out the short distance from the clutch lever to the track seen here.

5. Weight-less

Losing weight isn’t just difficult for humans, but Ducati has pared ounces wherever possible. Its monocoque frame design uses the engine as a stressed member in accompaniment with an aluminum front section that incorporates the steering head. It’s said to scale in at just 9.2 lbs, which is 8 lbs lighter than the exotic carbon-fiber full frame on the HP4 Race. Its single-sided aluminum swingarm is 76mm longer than the 1299’s for better traction, but weighs the same 11.2 lbs. To gain perspective on the relative weights of these structural pieces, consider the Panigale V4’s exhaust system: at 21.4 lbs, it weighs more than the frame and swingarm combined.

Lightweight magnesium is sprinkled around the Panigale V4. In addition to the aforementioned engine covers, the casting seen here weighs just 1.5 lbs and does triple duty as the bracket for the headlamp, mirrors and instrument panel.

Aluminum, rather than heavier steel, is used for the Panigale’s fuel tank, a portion of which is positioned below the rider MotoGP style. Its total capacity is 4.23 gallons. The curb weight for the V4 S is stated at 430 lbs, 6 lbs lighter than the standard Panigale V4 because of its lighter wheels and lithium-ion battery.

6. Hi, Tech!

The Panigale V4’s electronics are state of the art, employing a new six-axis Bosch IMU to provide a host of aids that keep riders safer while helping them go faster. Most are evolutions of existing aids, but there are a few new ones like slide control, drift braking and lean-angle sensitive quickshifting (up and down) and engine-brake control. All are independently adjustable via intuitive left-side switchgear and visible on the brilliant TFT instrument panel.

  • ABS Cornering Bosch EVO
  • Ducati Traction Control EVO (with “spin on demand” when set to levels 1 or 2)
  • Ducati Slide Control (DSC)
  • Ducati Wheelie Control EVO
  • Ducati Power Launch (DPL)
  • Ducati Quick Shift up/down EVO
  • Engine Brake Control EVO
  • Ducati Electronic Suspension EVO (on V4 S and Speciale models)

After fettling with various settings, I preferred ABS 1 (ABS on front wheel only), DTC 3 (allowing controllable sliding), and DWC 2 (because I like wheelies). I didn’t have time to experiment with EBC. The quickshifter swapped cogs up and down as seamlessly as any gearbox I’ve toggled.

Grateful for electronic rider aids and happy they are individually adjustable and can be set to non-intrusive levels. Check out how the tail-light wraps around the rear bodywork; I never imagined a see-through ass could look so good.

7. Suspenders

The standard Panigale V4 uses a fully adjustable Showa Big Piston fork and Sachs shock, while the V4 S we tested employs the latest generation of Öhlins semi-active suspension in an NIX-30 fork and TTX36 shock. Manual mode allows compression, rebound, and steering damper settings to be manually set, while the dynamic mode automatically adjusts damping depending on various parameters received from the IMU.

I wasn’t a big proponent of the first-gen Öhlins electronic suspension on the 1299 Panigale, so I’m happy to report that the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 system proved faultless under my butt at Valencia. Its dynamic mode features Objective Based Tuning Interface (OBTi), which provided well-chosen damping rates at all points around the track. Ride modes affect the tuning, providing a plusher stroke in Street mode than the stiffer setups in and Sport and Race modes. After the first session, I switched to Race mode and didn’t have a suspension complaint the rest of the day.

Wires atop the fork tubes send electronic signals to the damping circuits based on data gathered by the six-axis IMU.

8. Braking Benchmarks

We’ve professed our love for Brembo’s wonderfully powerful M50 brake calipers since they were first introduced on Ducati’s 1199 we reviewed in 2012, and they’ve been our fave front binders on many subsequently introduced bikes. Now, with Ducati’s close relationship with Brembo, we see new Brembo Stylema monoblock calipers that are thus far offered exclusively on the Panigale V4. They’re slightly smaller and 70 grams lighter than the M50s, and each employs four 30mm pistons squeezing 330mm discs.

At Valencia, I was initially disappointed with the Stylemas’ softer bite, but after a few laps I dug into their deep well of power, and found they actually delivered superior modulation thanks to a longer lever pull. There ain’t nothing wrong with M50s, but these new calipers are at least as good and combine for a loss of 140 grams from the front wheel. At the rear, a two-piston clamper squeezes a 245mm rotor.

9. Don’t Worry, Be IP

Traditionalists are often scornful of electronic instrument panels, but there’s lot to love about the Panigale V4’s 5-inch high-brightness TFT display, which might be the best one we’ve ever seen. Old-school riders will appreciate the analog tachometer whose needle changes from white to orange to red as the engine approaches its rev limit. The panel also includes a trip computer, air temp gauge, lap timer, clock and Ducati Multimedia System information. Its electronics even boasts self-canceling turnsignals, although I hope you’ll forgive me for not testing them at Valencia.

The Panigale V4’s TFT display is the slickest we’ve seen on a motorcycle, with vibrantly clear graphics, seen here in low-light setting with a black background. Note the bottom-right corner of the screen that displays toggle-able settings for the electronic rider aids.

Importantly, a rider doesn’t need to memorize the owner’s manual to be able to navigate the various controls and setting. Ducati tells us it worked closely with parent company Audi to simplify the instrument’s controls and menu settings to make the IP intuitive, and those efforts have paid off. It requires just a few minutes of poking around the switchgear (borrowed from the Multistrada) to execute and adjust various settings.

10. Price-y

You didn’t think all this technology and Italian craftsmanship would be cheap, did you? The Panigale V4 S we tested retails for a healthy $27,495. That’s a lot, but it’s a whole lotta sport motorcycle. Riders on a budget might prefer the base model, which rings in $6,300 cheaper at a more palatable $21,195.

The depth of your Ducati love might depend on the depth of your wallet.

In case it’s not yet obvious, let me state unequivocally that the Panigale V4 S is the best sportbike you can buy for less than $28,000. It’s packed with performance and technology that shames anything else in its price range, and the fact that its lovely Italian styling adds a certain panache is the cherry on top. It simply sets a new standard for sportbikes.

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Ducati Communities

  • Born to Ride

    The swingarm is 76mm longer!!? That is 3 inches! Are you sure that isn’t a typo?

    So Duke, HP4 Race or V4S with track fairings, exhaust, and and carbon fiber wheels?

    • V4 S. The reason is in the first two characters of its name.

    • DickRuble

      Neither. There will be an homologation bike. That’s the one they’ll get.

    • Kevin Duke

      The new engine is more compact than the V-Twin and is rotated rearward in the frame (looking like a V rather than the lay-down L-Twin style), so that enable the longer swingarm.

      • DickRuble

        Interesting, you had a different take when I made the same points about the Superleggera vs the HP4.

        • Hamish Lamont

          Are you surprised? If you rode a Superleggera you’d understand why. And its THE pinnacle of Duc V2 development.

          • DickRuble

            I am surprised. Experienced, well moneyed riders have been falling over themselves about what a superlative bike the Superleggera is. No, I have not ridden it. Can’t imagine it handles slower than my bike.

        • Kevin Duke

          I can’t find where I disagreed with you in that thread?

          • DickRuble

            You upvoted the reply to my statement. I interpreted it as your favoring the HP4, irrational exuberance over “sense and pragmatism”, as B2R put it.

            http://disq.us/p/1njprfg

  • Mad4TheCrest

    Sounds like Ducati hit one out of the park. Now, if I can convince my Son to graduate college a year and a half early I might be able to afford one.

    • Johnny Blue

      Or you try to convince him to drop out and get a job…

  • john phyyt

    Does it still use belts to drive those desmo valve Cams?

    • Born to Ride

      Not since the Testastretta.

      • Axel

        You mean Panigale?

        • Mad4TheCrest

          potato/po-tah-to
          In the superbike line belts were last seen on the 1198 Testastretta meaning they were first absent on the Panigale 🙂

          • Axel

            You’re correct, I thought you included the Testastretta. Sorry, not a native English speaker.
            Pantah up to 1198: all basically the same rubber band engine, including the Desmoquattro and Testastretta.
            Panigale / Pani V4: chains.

        • Born to Ride

          Superquad engine has timing chains. Get on my level.

          • mikstr

            Not according to the Ducati press material and photos I saw; belts gave way to chains on the Panigales….

          • Born to Ride

            The superquad is the engine the powers the panigale? Hence it using timing chains…

          • mikstr

            my mistake, I misinterpreted/misunderstood (brain fart I guess); you are correct. sorry…

          • Born to Ride

            All good man

  • DickRuble

    Ergos? Can Sean A. ride a full day in comfort on the bike? Some say that the Aprilia still has the best engine…

    • I’ll be glad to find out! If my new bike is 30 pounds lighter than some other squid’s new bike, would it be OK for me to have another cheeseburger?

      • Johnny Blue

        Only if your goal in life is to die of a heart attack on a 30 lbs lighter motorcycle…

      • DickRuble

        As long as you can still outrace Kevin D. at the track, sure, go for it.

    • Kevin Duke

      In my haste to get this posted, I forgot to include the ergos are the same as the 1299 but with 10mm higher footpegs. So you might want to choose something else for a road trip to Alaska…

      • DickRuble

        Thanks! Super Duke ergos are the reference for me to consider a bike.

      • Mad4TheCrest

        I guess we will need that V4 Multistrada after all

  • Old MOron

    Damn, instead of ten things to know, you could’ve made it just one:
    You’re probably not worthy, but get it anyway.

    • Born to Ride

      I just watched the video. Literally every single time he opens the throttle, the TC is engaged. WTF was the point of bumping the displacement 100cc?

      • Old MOron

        Yeah, it seems like he’s being smooth with the throttle, yet the TC kicks in every time… until the bike is more upright. I suppose that’s when the extra cc are felt.

        • Born to Ride

          Not even when the bike is upright, the only time it turns off is after he shifts down a straight. I was amused, whenever you can hear the engine, the light is on. Lol

          • DickRuble

            The fact the light is on may only mean “activated” (ready to intervene) .. not “intervening”.

          • asg21

            Not to be picky, and you’re only repeating what testers write or imply, but do you really think that the tire/road surface interface can be “adjusted” hundreds of times per second to optimize traction? How would that work, exactly? I’m not referring to sensor inputs, but rather the bike’s suspension changes in response to those inputs.

          • DickRuble

            Sensors can dwtect smallchanges in tire traction. Signal is sent to control unit whch adjusts fueling. There is no suspension adjustment in traction control.

      • StripleStrom

        Spec sheet wars.

    • Jeevan Chaukar

      Good one 🙂 LOL….

  • le Queef

    Looks like a fat hog. Welcome to the future Ducati. Too bad it took you years to get here. If you had a DeLorean with a flux-capacitor that was garbage fueled and took you to 88 miles per hour, perhaps you could catch up with those who were already forward thinking and weren’t hired away to MotoGP. This bike is shite.

    • Born to Ride

      Lol wut?

      • spiff

        Read the name, he’s a queef. And his avatar is sweet as well.

    • P Banks

      Bitter and jaded much?

      • Rocky Stonepebble

        He just found out his sister is cheating on him.

  • Mark Vizcarra

    Ohh I see an Aprilia RSV vs Ducati shootout in the future. I wonder if Ducati will make a competitor to the Tuono?

    • Kevin Duke

      When talking to Domenicali, he vaguely admitted a new Streetfighter will be on the way, but it’s unclear if it would use the new V-4 or instead a version of the 1299 motor. Do you want a Ducati Tuono or a Ducati Super Duke…?

      • Old MOron

        I just want to see Ducati participate in shootouts again.

        • Kevin Duke

          Now that it has a displacement advantage, it probably will!

      • Prakasit

        Ducati Tuono. I’d say Ducati revamp their line up and put V4s on all their premium bikes, 959, Streetfighter etc. And only leave Monsters and Scramblers with twins.

        • Superlight

          Trouble is, that’d make them all at a very “premium” price.

          • Kevin Duke

            Yep, the V-4 costs more to produce. More to come on that topic…

        • spiff

          I hope any twins will be strokers. Over square isn’t needed on the street.

      • DickRuble

        Honda Tuono.

        • spiff

          Honda doesn’t have the stones anymore.

          • DickRuble

            let’s wait and see Panigale V4 S vs CBR1000RR SP vs Aprilia RSV4 RF

      • Mark Vizcarra

        A Ducati Tuono

        That’s a no brainer. If the streetfigher was successful, it would still be in the current lineup

        • Mad4TheCrest

          The Streetfighter was too racy for the standard bike crowd and not racy enough for the sportbike crowd. The 1098 version was also almost as pricey as the full boat superbike too, which didn’t help. Still, a great machine which only needed a metal tank, slightly less sporty ergonomics, and a modestly lowered pricing scheme to have succeeded.

      • Mad4TheCrest

        I’ll take a Streetfighter with the 1299 Superquaddro twin please. Keep it nice and narrow in the middle, with kick-ass torque, and please lose the ugly plumbing that now blights the left side of Ducati’s Monsters.

  • spiff

    I don’t really give a hoot about sportbikes anymore, but this thing seems pretty freakin awsome.

    • SerSamsquamsh

      Yeah – that looks terrifying!

    • Craig Hoffman

      Watching the video was like playing a computer motorcycle game. Hard to believe the revs can rise that fast. That bike is just plain hectic and way out of my league. Would not turn down a ride on it though, but only on a track. I would not even want to ride that on the street. It would be a waste, and trouble could come calling before you even know it is there. Kudos to Kevin for having the skill and balls to ride like that to bring us the video!

      That TFT instrument panel is awesome by the way. Everything else looks dated now.

      • Mad4TheCrest

        Well said. I can’t imagine wanting to ride on the street revving to 13-14K all the time. But then again maybe you don’t need to. Judging from how early the TC intervened, there must be a reasonable chunk of that torque still residing down low.

        • Craig Hoffman

          Oh ya, you can see the way it jumps off corners, TC light blinking, there is power all over the tach face, no weakness anywhere. Hand of God power from casual RPM is what liter class sport bikes are about, but this bike takes that to a whole new and insane level!

      • D. Black

        Uh, just to clarify, that was Alessandro, the Ducati test rider throwing down the lap in that video. That lap also happened to only be 5 secs off the MotoGP lap record for that track… on a street bike with only the Akra exhaust added. Let that sink in just a bit.

  • JMDGT

    I need this machine. My life will not be complete without it.

  • Auphliam

    This whole article needs a big Like button. Well done, sir.

    • DickRuble

      There’s a little heart at the top of the comment section, right under the number of comments. It says “Recommend” next to it.

  • Starmag
    • WPZ

      The maintenance losses and costs.

      • ColoradoS14

        When the bike is $21k-$29k, you dont care that every 15k miles your valve adjustment service costs $1200 instead of $650…. Pretty small price to pay.

        • Mad4TheCrest

          Yeah, the bigger worry will be not dropping the damn thing. Can you imagine the cost of replacement parts?!?

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Or the ribbing down at the club? The boys will go mad with laughter. Now do be a dear and get me a G’nT.

          • 12er

            faring screw for my multi was $9

          • Mad4TheCrest

            That’s what I call a ‘premium screw’

    • ColoradoS14

      At least in my state most Ducati/Aprilia/Triumph sportbike premiums are lower than the Japanese bikes. I think they get crashed less, stolen less, etc.

      • Mad4TheCrest

        When I replaced an 1198 Ducati superbike by downsizing to a Street Triple 675, my premium went up! Never mind that Duc could get me into far more trouble far more quickly. Best guess is the Street Trip is a model that as you said gets crashed and/or stolen more.

        • Rocky Stonepebble

          You wouldn’t believe what I was first quoted for an NS400R! (The blacklist had just come out. Every bike I’d ever owned was on it). Seems they were a crash/trash fave, which is odd, because I’m the only one I knew that rode it and not raced it.

  • Rick Vera
    • Kevin Duke

      LOL! 🙂

      • Jaime Berrones

        hahahahahaha!!!!!!

        • Tessie

          Goℴgle giving to people of all ages $97 per hour to complete some internet services onnet .. Do job for few peroid of time daily and have greater time with your own friends … Any person can join this easy job…on Friday I bought a great new Lotus Elan after just earning $9097 this six weeks .it sounds the most rewarding however you could not forgive yourself if you don’t check out this.!rw372x:> http://GoogleNewCareOpportunity/earn/hourly ♥♥p♥♥♥x♥♥♥r♥♥♥y♥♥a♥♥♥e♥♥♥r♥♥e♥x♥♥j♥o♥♥♥x♥♥♥o♥u♥x♥♥♥w♥p♥y♥o♥♥♥z♥f♥♥♥l♥p♥♥♥m♥f:::::!hx56p:lhuhuh

    • barrylindon

      JAJAJAJA, you win the internet with that.

  • Jaime Berrones

    I don´t know if this bike is the fastest or best bike i ever seen, but to me, at least in photos is a piece of art , its like ferrari designed it ,damn italians!!!

  • StripleStrom

    All the new rider aids and electronics are making bikes 10 years ago look like they have a side shifter, foot clutch, and timing advance on the hand grip! They also are making me feel old. I’m so tempted to say things like “in my day, we didn’t have any of them fancy electronics to keep us from crashing”.

    • toomanycrayons

      Don’t kid yourself. On the street the bike is still a lawn dart. That being said, I’m buying a lottery ticket. “Honey, where are the empties…?”

      • Rocky Stonepebble

        “Between your ears!” she responded.

        Tosser.

        • toomanycrayons

          ‘”Between your ears!” she responded.

          Tosser.’-Rocky Stonepebble

          You toss her, she’s your Honey.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            “You toss her, she’s your Honey. -toomanycrayons”

            Idiot.

          • toomanycrayons

            ‘”You toss her, she’s your Honey. -toomanycrayons”

            Idiot.’-Rocky Stonepebble

            Don’t be so hard on yourself. You figured it out.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            ‘Don’t be so hard on yourself. You figured it out. -toomanycrayons’

      • Mad4TheCrest

        LOL, ‘Lawn Dart’! That’s damn funny imagery (but a little scary too).

  • kenneth_moore

    Is the single-sided swingarm the best design/engineering choice, or is it a continuing concession to Ducati tradition?

    • Kevin Duke

      A bit of both, I’d say. With advances in metallurgy and FEM, it’s probably as good as any modern swingarm. It costs more to produce, but it looks so cool…

    • Born to Ride

      Shhhhh, it is the last thing about the bike that is still Ducati. Aluminum frame, 4 cylinders, chain driven cams. Desmo Valves and SSSA are all we have left! That and monochrome red paint. 😉

    • Proheli

      A woman in a red dress and heels can’t run as fast as a girl in shorts and sneakers. And you know what, we don’t care. 🙂

  • elgar

    The new Ducati Panigale V4 = a real Bologna Bullet!!

  • Christian Albers

    Great article Kevin. Keep up the good work. This bike might be in my future. 🙂

    • ColoradoS14

      I am sitting here waiting to see what the next generation Tuono will bring and praying that Ducati builds a bike that is a direct V4 competitor so I can struggle over which of those to choose. The thought of comfortable version of this bike makes me giddy. I have an Aprilia twin now and have decided that my next bike will be a V4, that soundtrack is just unbeatable.

      • Kevin Duke

        The problem with a Duc Streetfighter V4 will be its cost. The base Panigale V4 retails for $21k, so a SF version would likely cost around $19k. That’s 4 grand more than a Tuono RR. If you want a naked V-4 and like Aprilias, it’s already waiting for you. 🙂

        • spiff

          $19k you say. What is a 1200r Monster going for?

          • Born to Ride

            Same price. But it has high end, manually adjustable, Öhlins suspension and CF bodywork. I think they’d be hard pressed to sell a V4 Streetfighter with all the goodies that the M1200R has on it for less than 20 grand. Unless they have a less expensive steel frame/subframe or something planned to cut costs.

          • Mad4TheCrest

            The M1200R, despite its premium 19k asking price, does not have an up/down quickshifer or cornering ABS and lean-sensitive traction control. Those things come included on the current Tuono and the first two are on the $18K current M1200S. Ducati should be able to squeeze those treats into a 19k MV4. More importantly they could design the exhaust and plumbing to be easier on the eyes than in that current Monster line.

          • Born to Ride

            Could they though? The testastretta is cheaper to build than the SupQuad, and the V4 is more expensive still. The R model is a few years old now, and lacks the IMU. But the current 1200S has the goodies you mentioned and it’s pushing 18k. I don’t see a V4 Streetfighter with forged Marchesini wheels, Öhlins suspension, and all the electronic BS you need to even ride it, costing less than $22-23k.

          • Mad4TheCrest

            The R and S Monsters are overpriced for something using a 10 year old engine design. The pricing would be reasonable though for a new V4.

          • Born to Ride

            That’s your opinion, not their’s. Unfortunately.

        • Proheli

          I love the Tuono, but it doesn’t have the looks of the Ducati. Most of the guys who’ve got 17k for a bike have another 5k for the better looking one. We will just have to see what Ducati does over the next few years. Re: the Monster 1200 R, its a fantastic bike, but it doesn’t scream RACE, or MENTAL, like the SFS did. “If Ducati builds something inspired, THEY will come.” 🙂 Thats a famous movie quote.

  • Richard Thompson

    EGO EGO EGO! Go to any track day and watch 14 year old gsxr’s with zero electronics blasting past the latest and greatest!.Even more so on the road with 80 hp classics passing 1299 panigale’s in the tight stuff with ease and a copper with radar waiting for his 200hp on the straights.The bloody cpu is giving you a fraction of the 200hp because you cannot actually use anymore so whats the point????

    • Rocky Stonepebble

      You. Are. A. Tosser.

      • Richard Thompson

        Brilliant reply you lazy retard.

        • Rocky Stonepebble

          If I was lazy, I would not have responded. You’re not too clever, are you?

          Wanker.

          • Richard Thompson

            Stonepebble is apt description of your tiny dried up little brain rattling around in your empty skull .Thousands of mindless unreasoned comments and insults posted on here by you. You need to turn your computer off go outside and join the real world you pathetic little man.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            So true. But you are still a pretentious wanker.

    • Kevin Duke

      And the rider on the old Gixxer blasting past new bikes, do you think he might go quicker on the Duc…? And if he don’t like electronics, he can switch them off.

      • Mad4TheCrest

        I read his post differently. Not complaining about electronics, rather commenting that if a bike needs electronics to contain the effects of 200 bhp on the street, maybe that’s too much bhp for the street. Of course he’s missing the point that all superbikes going back quite a few years have had more bhp than is advisable on the street. At least the modern ones give average Joes a fighting chance at controlling it.

        • Rocky Stonepebble

          There. Can. Never. Be. Too. Much. Horsepower.

          Honestly, I don’t know you anymore.

          • Mad4TheCrest

            I hardly know myself anymore. I’ve gone over all logical and reasonable.

          • spiff

            Just like money, there is enough, but never to much.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Two true!

    • ColoradoS14

      Yea, but put the same 14 year old on this and he will SMOKE himself on the GSX-R. Same played out expensive bike hate. Why do we have to hate on perhaps the most impressive, readily, commercially available bike today because sometime rich guys buy them when they have more money than skill. That does not mean that talented riders on this won’t be faster.

      Also, better be thrilled there are plenty of guys with plenty of money who can afford these things and help support the technology trickle down that we all benefit from…

      • Kevin Duke

        An upvote didn’t seem enough for such a reasonable and considered reply, thanks!

        • Rocky Stonepebble

          Umm … as much as I have disdain for Dickie Thompson, I fear the Colorado chap is illiterate. Richard, or “Dick” as he prefers, mentioned a fourteen year-old motorcycle. Not, a fourteen year-old motorcycle pilot.

          Sadly, Dickie and Collie are both allowed to vote. And operate motor vehicles. And have children. And just all around harsh my good times.

          • ColoradoS14

            Haha, you are right! I edited my post. The message remains the same.

        • ColoradoS14

          Haha, thanks. Everyone’s got to hate. Harley and Euro bikes get it for being “garage queens” but hey, when I am on day 2 of a 1300 mile ride through the wilds of Colorado and Utah guess the what bikes I see on the road…. That’s right, Harleys, Euro adventure bikes, a maybe a touring bike or two. When I hit the canyons on the west side of town it is the Ducati club and guys like that who are tearing it up the canyons.

          I did one last year, 987 miles in two days of beautiful SW Colorado mountain roads on my Aprilia. I kept track, once you left the Denver city limits I saw 5 sport bikes over the whole trip. 1 Hayabusa, 1 Panigale, 1 848, 1 Daytona 675, 1 RSV4, 1 CBR600RR. Anecdotal I know, but, when I consider just how many more JDM bikes are sold every year.

          Hell watch RNickeyMouse’s videos from Mulholland and it is half european bikes. When you think that Ducati sells under 10k bikes a year and Honda sells 275k it becomes clear to me that on a bike by bike basis it is really the Japanese bikes that end up being the real garage queens.

          With that said, go to a track day and the story is just the opposite. But that is primarily a cost driver. It is a whole lot more affordable to buy a crashed GSX-R 750 and convert it to a track bike than it is a RC8R.

      • Richard Thompson

        My point being that 15 years of technology can be negated by rider skill and in the real world at track days you see that all the time.The handling and braking aids are fine but 200hp plus is about boasting rights especially on the road and on the track and is not used ever on the road and by a few elite riders on the track.

        • Mad4TheCrest

          Oh, you can definitely use all 200 rwbhp on the Road. But not often, and not without exquisite paranoia and a really good lawyer.

          • Richard Thompson

            Not sure where u are but here in Australia the law is just getting more and more restrictive.You could make national news headlines doing 200kph and do jail time if it’s your 2nd offence.Most people here just give it a quick squirt through the gears and then back to droning along at 100 Kph until the next set of corners!

          • Mad4TheCrest

            SoCal, with most of my riding done on Angeles Crest in the mountains on LA’s east side. There are some local spots where you can unleash your superbike physically pretty safely, but every second of doing so risks incarceration, loss of license, or – if you are lucky, a really boring lecture followed by a massive fine. The wiser folk here do as you described in your last sentence, or close enough.

  • Rocky Stonepebble

    Dukie! Does this POS really compare with an RZ500? Really?

    • Kevin Duke

      It compares very favorably in speed, if not nostalgia. 🙂

  • Alan Golightly

    track video is hauling ass!

    • Born to Ride

      Pro rider FTW. 4 seconds off MotoGP is no joke.

  • Chris

    Any idea/thoughts on how the base model compares to the upper trim levels? 21K for a top-end Duc, I might could (almost) justify; 28K is waaaay pushing it.

    • Kevin Duke

      It’ll be almost as good. Heavier wheels will make it steer a bit slower. Manually adjustable suspension won’t adapt to changing conditions. Those are the two main differences, so get your $21k together!

      • Chris

        The lighter wheels are worth more than the suspension to me. I’m still not sure about all this electronic suspension stuff. Sounds troublesome down the road…Much obliged. And send your donation.

        • 12er

          ^ hence my ’13 Multi being a rare standard model. First year skyhook scared the heck out of me when only 2 year warranty and no quote on how much it would be to fix it if something were to go wrong. Key Fob Antenna was $400 to replace…

          • Born to Ride

            Bosch upped the warranty on the skyhook internals to 7 years. rest of the bike is only 2 though.

        • Beju

          The wheels are probably $3500 of that cost, judging by what Marchesini wheels for the 1199/1299 cost. They can be had for $3100 without looking too hard, so you could probably save almost $4k (closer to $5k if you’re fine with OZ wheels) if you went with the base model and upgraded later.

  • Mad4TheCrest

    Ok, just re-read the article and noticed two things I glossed over at first read:

    14 to 1 compression! That’s almost a diesel. Will Premium fuel be good enough?

    16L / 4.3 gallon fuel capacity! Oh no, I predict the fuel light coming on at 70 miles of hard use. Not a problem on track but that could be damn inconvenient exploring rural twisties where stations may be few. Oh well, it’s a superbike not an ST.

    • Born to Ride

      That was the first spec that I looked for on the sheet. All the extra stress of 14:1 compression ratio, 100cc over the class displacement, and for what? Bragging rights?

      • D. Black

        Not bragging rights.. better power usability on the street. That extra torque will help more at lower RPM and carry over a lot of what folks enjoyed on the 1299. Will probably run much much smoother at really low RPM where the L-twin would struggle.

        • Born to Ride

          Super hotrodded twins always chug at low RPM.The off idle driveability will be greatly improved by the additional cylinders, not the additional displacement. As for bumping torque? Sure, more displacement means more torque. But this bike makes more power through the midrange than slicks can handle on the track(see video), so it is definitely going to effortlessly vanquish a set of Q3s. All I’m saying is that this engine is tuned to the bleeding edge of performance, and that will undoubtedly reduce its longevity. But then again, most people consider a 20k mile Ducati superbike clapped out, and its resale plummets precipitously past that point. Maybe they just figured they would run with that stereotype and make it the reality.

          • D. Black

            Yep, exactly what I was referring to about the L-twin struggling vs. a v4. The added cylinders will smooth it out quite a bit down low, which is an improvement in ride-ability from that of a performance twin. At least as far as stop and go street riding is concerned. The added torque from the 100cc bump just allows a rider to lug it around a bit easier without having to rely on RPM to get the same effect/result.

            The whole notion that every bike has to somehow adhere to this 1000cc limit, is a bit dated. The bikes are production street bikes. If the 100cc bump helps add a little grunt for the street, more power to them (pun intended). They will drop a homologated V4R to meet racing requirements at the end of the year or so.

            Yeah, as for the longevity, can’t really speak to that. Time will tell I suppose. 15k/km service interval isn’t too terrible bad for a superbike class machine. I’m sure your spot on with the resale after 15-20k miles.

          • Born to Ride

            My assertion was that implying that a 430lb bike needs more than 80ft-lbs of wheel torque to be able to roll on at low RPM is a bit silly. But I do agree that the bikes don’t all need to displace 999cc to be superbikes. I take more issue with the stratospheric compression ratio than I do with the extra displacement. I just think it was silly to produce a “cheater” engine when they already have to electronically chop the balls off of regular literbikes to make them rideable these days.

          • Dario Pinolini

            Cheat ? I didn’t knew that 1100 where forbidden

          • Born to Ride

            Cheater engine is just a term used to describe engines that don’t conform to the racing standards. The 636 Kawi, the 675 Triumph, and the 1078 MV have been ascribed the moniker in the past. I didn’t make it up. Hence the quotations.

  • Matt O

    i can’t wait for this motor to move to other bikes. can you imagine this in a Diavel? i can, its terrifying and i want it.

  • libsarescum

    Excuse me, I got to take a cold shower.