For the third time in four seasons, Repsol Honda supernova Marc Marquez claimed the MotoGP world championship. He did it by winning the Japanese Grand Prix while the Bruise Brothers of the factory Yamaha team – Jorge Lorenzo and the legend Valentino Rossi – choked on their own bile, both riders crashing out of a race in which neither could afford the slightest error. This unlikely confluence of events is responsible for, among other things, the very pedestrian championship celebration prior to the podium. Nothing like the Bushido spectacle we watched in 2014.

It was all smiles in the Repsol Honda garage as Marc Marquez celebrates his fifth world championship (three in MotoGP, one in Moto2 and another in the former 125cc class.

Notes from Practice and Qualifying

Dani Pedrosa’s race (and possibly his season) ends in a cloud of dust after crashing during practice. Pedrosa broke his collarbone in four places while also fracturing his right fibula.
Line-up changes for those scoring from home
Repsol Honda: Dani Pedrosa out; Hiroshi Aoyama in. Pedrosa needs to think about retiring before he starts to resemble Quasimodo after a second serious injury suffered here by “The Master of Motegi.” The break, which left his right collarbone in four pieces, was described by the rider’s surgeon as the “least serious” of all of Dani’s collarbone breaks. Right.
Ducati Corse: Andrea Iannone out; Hector Barbera in.
Avintia: Barbera out; Mike Jones in.
Yamaha: Katsuyuki Nakasuga wildcard

Jorge Lorenzo, Andrea Dovizioso, Marc Marquez and Maverick Vinales were quick on Friday. Bradley Smith and Jack Miller returned from injury, young Jack needing to get some laps in before fighting for the win at Phillip Island next week – in his head. Smith is lapping very slowly on Friday and appears to be saving himself for KTM. Miller starts 14th, with Smith alongside him in the last spot on the fifth row.

Rossi somehow took the pole everyone in the joint expected would belong to Marquez, with #93 second and Lorenzo somehow completing the front row. An international second row formed up on the top Ducati qualifier, Italian  Dovizioso, joined by Brit Cal Crutchlow and Spaniard Aleix Espargaro, who whipped his Suzuki hard, pushing teammate Vinales, in seventh by 4/100ths of a second, to the third row and feeling pretty good about it.

If nothing else, Mike Jones, the replacement for Barbera at Avintia, won the battle of “Who Gets to Wear #7?”, beating Hiro Aoyama who, denied his usual number, went with #73 and a long story as to why.

Hiroshi Aoyama, the 2009 250cc Grand Prix Champion, took Pedrosa’s place for Repsol Honda.

Rossi, Lorenzo and Marquez each have 64 poles across all classes. Rossi’s been at it 21 years, Lorenzo 15 and Marquez nine. And, by the way, 64 is the all-time record, which will get broken a number of times every year for the next decade at least. Is this the Golden Age of motorcycle racing? Possibly.

The Race

The 2016 Japanese Grand Prix was, itself, a conventional, low-drama affair. Early on, the Yamahas asserted themselves, as the front group consisted of Lorenzo, Marquz, Rossi and Aleix Espargaro, who, along with his teammate Vinales, discovered how much the Suzuki GSX-RR does love itself some Motegi. Rossi took a couple of swings at Marquez early but couldn’t get anything to stick, while Lorenzo was riding with “bumps and bruises” suffered on Saturday morning that would leave most mortals lying in a hospital somewhere. Marquez went through on Lorenzo into the lead on Lap 4. Rossi crashed on Lap 7. Lorenzo crashed on Lap 20. Championship over. Oh, and Dovizioso claimed second while Vinales took third.

The 2016 MotoGP season in a nutshell.

Historians will argue for years weeks as to where this race was actually won or lost. Some will insist it was at Turn 10 on Sunday when Rossi went lowside, unforced, for the third time this season. Some will say it was at Turn 9 on Sunday, where Marquez went through on Lorenzo on Lap 4 and where Lorenzo lost his grits on Lap 20, the moment at which Marquez effectively clinched the title. Some will say it was Turn 2 on Saturday, when Lorenzo crashed heavily in FP3 and was airlifted to the local hospital, only to return in time for FP4. After Lap 4, when Marquez took the lead for good, the only drama concerned whether the 2016 trophy would be awarded to Marquez in Japan or Australia.

Random Thoughts Before The Big Picture

Despite suffering a huge crash during the third practice session, a limping Jorge Lorenzo returned from a precautionary hospital visit and still qualified on the front row.
  • The pressure on Lorenzo and Rossi, especially, had to be immense while the riders waited for the red lights to go out. Rossi, who suffers notoriously from jetlag, can’t have been feeling great sitting on pole, while Lorenzo had been in a wheelchair with an IV drip barely 28 hours earlier. It was pressure for one and pain for the other that forced the errors. It also extended the Yamaha winless streak to 8.
  • Riders at Motegi spend 30% of their time on the brakes. Looks like the fabled braking power of the Yamaha M1 may be overrated, as Tech3’s Pol Espargaro was the top-finishing Yamaha, 19 seconds behind Marquez.
  • In the Redding vs. Petrucci cage match going on at Pramac Ducati, Scott Redding exercised his “rope-a-dope” strategy to perfection, staying on teammate Danilo Petrucci’s rear wheel all day and conceding a single point to the Italian. Not sure what the official score is inside the Pramac garage, as Petrucci was penalized by management for his takedown of Redding in Aragon.
  • Today’s race attendance was just over 52,000. Back in the late ’70s I was sitting in a friendly nickel-dime-quarter poker game one night and drew three cards inside to a straight flush for a $2.00 pot. Marquez today probably felt at least a little like I did that night long ago, taking the world championship thousands of miles from home in front of a small crowd in the middle of the night.
  • What is the Repsol Honda team going to do with all the props they’ve packed away for the Phillip Island championship celebration?

The Big Picture

Johann Zarco escapes Japan with a 21-point lead over Alex Rins in the Moto2 title chase.

With three races left, we turn our attention to the MotoGP undercards and the Moto2 title fight. Johann Zarco gave himself some breathing room over challenger Alex Rins by taking second place today while Rins finished out of the points, presumably the result of a crash or a leisurely walkabout in the kitty litter. Zarco’s 21-point cushion with three rounds left make him the odds-on favorite to become the first repeat Moto2 champion since the category came into existence.

The undercards in the premier class:

  • Rossi and Lorenzo recorded DNFs; Rossi’s margin over Lorenzo in the battle for second best remains 14.
  • Vinales leapt over the injured Pedrosa into fourth place for the season with his 16 points today, to the delight of Team Suzuki.
  • Dovizioso’s podium today pushed him past Crutchlow into sixth place. Crutchlow, for his part, rallied from a non-descript start to finish fifth and blamed disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field for his poor start.
  • Tech 3 Yamaha’s Pol Espargaro claimed 10 points today, breaking the tie for eighth place with the idle  Iannone.
  • Suzuki pilot Aleix Espargaro, on the strength of his formidable fourth place finish today, cut Barbera’s lead in the race for 10th to two points. This despite the fact that Barbera had a shiny new factory Ducati Desmosedici GP16 to crash today, which he took full advantage of on Lap 9.
Hector Barbera didn’t get his Ducati Corse red leathers until race day so he practiced and qualified in his usual blue Avintia duds.

Waltzing Matilda

Round 16 launches this next week at Phillip Island. As such, it kicks off the dreaded Epilogue section of the season, the three races (and three previews) we here at MO need to spice up to maintain your interest and engagement once the title has been decided. (Not that our usual work has all that much to do with motorcycle racing anyway.) Rest assured that we’ve kept our own powder dry and are fully prepared to speculate on things at least remotely related to MotoGP in Australia, Malaysia and Spain.

As Arlo Guthrie admitted in the folk classic “Alice’s Restaurant,” I’m not proud. Or tired.

2016 MotoGP Motegi Results
Pos. Rider Team Time
1 Marc Marquez Repsol Honda
2 Andrea Dovizioso Ducati Corse +2.992
3 Maverick Vinales Suzuki Ecstar +4.104
4 Aleix Espargaro Suzuki Ecstar +4.726
5 Cal Crutchlow LCR Honda +15.049
6 Pol Espargaro Monster Yamaha Tech3 +19.654
7 Alvaro Bautista Aprilia Gresini +23.0232
8 Danilo Petrucci Octo Pramac Yaknich Ducati +19.432
9 Scott Redding Octo Pramac Yaknich Ducati +28.802
10 Stefan Bradl Aprilia Gresini +32.330
11 Katsuyuki Nakasuga Yamalube Yamaha Factory Racing +42.845
12 Yonny Hernandez Aspar Ducati +52.219
13 Bradley Smith Monster Yamaha Tech3 +53.783
14 Tito Rabat Estrella Galicia 0,0 Marc VDS Honda +54.760
15 Hiroshi Aoyama Repsol Honda +1:00.155
16 Loris Baz Avintia Ducati +1:04.440
17 Hector Barbera Ducati Corse +1:42.966
18 Mike Jones Avintia Racing +1 Lap
Not Classified
DNF Jorge Lorenzo Movistar Yamaha 5 Laps
DNF Valentino Rossi Movistar Yamaha 18 Laps
DNF Jack Miller Estrella Galicia 0,0 Marc VDS Honda 18 Laps
DNF Eugene Laverty Aspar Ducati 22 Laps
2016 MotoGP Top Ten Standings After 15 Rounds
Pos. Rider Motorcycle Points
1 Marc Marquez Honda 273
2 Valentino Rossi Yamaha 196
3 Jorge Lorenzo Yamaha 182
4 Maverick Vinales Suzuki 165
5 Dani Pedrosa Honda 155
6 Andrea Dovizioso Ducati 124
7 Cal Crutchlow Honda 116
8 Pol Espargaro Yamaha 106
9 Andrea Iannone Ducati 96
10 Hector Barbera Ducati 84
  • Gruf Rude

    For whatever the historians figure its worth, I thought the pivotal moment in the race came early, when Marquez shrugged off Rossi with the annoyed outside pass. From there it seemed foreordained.

  • JMDonald

    Congratulations to Honda. The championship can’t always go down to the last race. Another day in MotoGP.

  • Old MOron

    In a way that race was a dud. Nothing was supposed to be settled this round. There was no build-up, hence the climax is dissatisfying. But on the other hand, the victory was thunderous, a third world championship with your rivals literally left spitting dust out of their mouths, trying to swallow the bitter taste of defeat. Wow, bring on Australia!

    • Ozzy Mick

      Well done to the Champ. If he stays fit and well, he’s going to win another 10! I agree with Brucey that it was anti-climactic but I’m sure #93 doesn’t care about that!
      But I care! Me mates are heading down to Phillip Island even as I sit here lamenting the conclusion of the chase for the title before Phillip Island.
      Actually, a family tragedy precludes me from joining them. Likewise, I had to pull out of riding with Michelle Christine. So, sorry Brucey, no banner at PI this time. Maybe another time…

      • Old MOron

        Shucks Mick, I don’t know you, but your MOronic presence makes you seem like an old cobber. I guess Brucey knows we appreciate him, and he’ll survive without his banner. You would’ve enhanced Michelle’s visit to Australia, but I’m sure all the friendly Aussies will show her a good time. So look after your family. And keep in touch.

        • Ozzy Mick

          Thanks OldMO. I guess you’re right about Brucey and Michelle. Let’s enjoy the rest of the season. Cheers.

      • Bruce Allen

        And just like that, there goes my last, well, PENULTIMATE reason for watching the race in Australia. I was going to have Dennis plaster the page with screenshots of some Irish guy holding up a bedsheet with my name painted on it…(sigh)…So sorry for your loss.

        • Ozzy Mick

          Thanks Brucey. Sorry to disappoint you, in more ways than one. Besides not displaying your name on a sheet at the Island, I’m as Irish as Dennis Chung – we share the same surname :)

          • Bruce Allen

            Your handle led me to believe you were shanty Irish living down under, probably descended from inmates of the former British penal colony. :)

          • Ozzy Mick

            Haha…just goes to show – can’t place much credence on handles. We’re a mixed bunch, us Aussies, much like the U S of A, but more so.

  • john phyyt

    Marquez is in another “faster” universe. Tranches be damned. Witness how well the other Honda went. If Pedrosa were fit I doubt he would have been top eight.
    Most gratifying is just how fast the Suzuki’s have become. I fondly remember American’s winning of this brand . Nicky is gone . Australian’s seem to get tail end rides. Is there really No-one from the greatest motorcycle market on earth who could make use of a satelite Suzuki, Aprillia or now KTM to wave the flag.?

    • Gruf Rude

      I’m not sure the USA is the greatest motorcycle market on earth, but the vast majority of our market is foot-forward cruisers with darn little interest in top level road racing, either for motorcycles or even cars.

    • john phyyt

      At least Nicky gets Pedrosa’s honda for Phillip Island. That is something.

  • Shlomi

    Rossi & Lorenzo “old style” could not match MM crazy breaking, and point and shoot style. Both low sided, Rossi while trying to close the gap to MM, and Lorenzo trying to stay a head of Dovi. Our only hope is for Lorenzo to get used to the Ducati spaceship and blast through MM on the straights. Amazing how easy it was for MM this year, just let your competition make mistakes, stay in the high points when you don’t have the speed to win, and go for the kill when you have the speed and feel. Congrats to MM for been so far a head of the competition.

  • Bruce Allen

    …and I did not receive a single “huzzah” for lying about Cal and the Earth’s magnetic field. As hard as it’s going to be to write the next six, it appears it will be even harder to get you mutts to read them. But I love you guys anyway.

    • Old MOron

      Aw Bruce, I thought you were speaking in hyperbole. I read your reports looking for insights, colorful language and sarcasm. I do not train my eyes on your prose as a fact-checking pedant logician.

  • Vrooom

    I’m starting to like the way BSB does the race series where the first 2/3s of the season is simply to identify the 6 riders who will compete in the last six races to determine the champion. It keeps the championship from being decided to too early. I think I have those numbers right. Old man Shakey (Mr.) Byrne did it again. Looking forward to Vinales giving Marquez a run for his money!

    • Gruf Rude

      Can’t see the need to change; I don’t think the bookies would have given odds that both Yamahas would have crashed out at Motegi, a circuit that favors them. If Rossi and Lorenzo had kept it on the wheels, this championship would still be undecided and only a crash away from being up in the air. I like the pure concept of a straight-up, season-long contest, the fewer format gimmicks, the better.

  • Vrooom

    Can they just give Pedrosa a metal collarbone? That guy has broken his collarbone an incredible number of times, it must look like the first dog house I built, all screws going in at weird angles.

  • Shlomi

    Anyone knows, why Motogp race Motegi and not Suzuka? After watching F1 last week, I think Suzuka is much better facility. Motegi always have many crashes, and it much less flowing racetrack.

    • BDan75

      Suzuka was deemed too dangerous after Daijiro Kato was killed there in 2003. Apparently it’s not practical to modify the track for larger run-off areas, etc.

      • Bruce Allen

        And an F-1 guy bought it there just this year. If not F-1 at least some buggy with four wheels. Ran into a bulldozer parked near a turn.

        • Shlomi

          It’s safe for the annual Suzuka 8 hours motorcycle race.

          • BDan75

            Different standards, I guess, and there may be other factors. The Isle of Man is still going strong, and grand prix racing stopped going there in the ’70s.

  • Starmag

    “What is the Repsol Honda team going to do with all the props they’ve
    packed away for the Phillip Island championship celebration?”

    Excellent one sentence summary of this race.

    • Bruce Allen

      You mean I could have dispensed with the other 1400 words? Dammit.

      • Starmag

        Well, you could have, but I would have been far less entertained. I’m thankful to have bread, but I want my circuses too.