Suzuki’s GSX-S1000 is another one of my personal faves; I like the way it looks, nobody can argue with the way the 140-plus horsepower four-banger goes – and the price is right too. Where else are you going to get that kind of grunt in a beautiful blue package for $10,499? Gabe was spot-on with his recent column.

2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000 First Ride Review

There always has to be a catch, though, which to crusty old me is more of a pea under our stack of mattresses. In defending the Suzuki against its critics, I did go on record as saying “I bet you can fix the Suzuki’s jerky throttle response with a quick reflash of its ECU,” and so I decided I would.

From the inception of fuel injection on motorcycles, there’s been a battle to make the transition from closed throttle to open as seamless as possible, a thing that some manufacturers got right quicker than others. All the carburetion tricks they’d learned to perfect throttle response were right out the window when an electric signal began calling the shots: Squirt fuel now! The results could be really jerky on some bikes, and more power meant more jerk. (For many, it’s only really a problem leaned over at corner exits, and the easiest way to fix it is by dragging a little rear brake.)

Japanese Mega Standards Shootout

Suzuki began using its SDTV valve from the beginning on its injected bikes in an effort to sedate throttle opening, and we have to guess it works pretty well since we’ve never ridden an injected GSX-R without it. It’s not perfect. Here’s what Brasscannons wrote at the end of last month’s big comparo (wherein the Suzuki beat up two bikes that cost substantially more and succumbed to three others which cost substantially more):

The EFI is glitchy at low rpm, suffering from the dreaded off-to-on-throttle abruptness. Additionally, the Gixxus occasionally has trouble holding neutral throttle and dropping into deceleration without a change in grip position. These symptoms are usually encountered at around-town engine and road speeds – right where streetbikes spend most of their time. Flip on the rider’s red mist, though, and the fueling issues rapidly shrink in the mirrors as the revs climb to canyon-scratching levels. Our collective prognostication says the GSX-S1000 is just an EFI flash away from streetable perfection.

Before ...

Before …

… and after, with nice sticker.

… and after, with nice sticker.

Cheap being my middle name, I went googling and came up with FlashTune.com, which couldn’t be more convenient as they’re located about three miles from the home office. Strolling through its website, I find two options for our GSX-S1000: Send in the stock ECU and have them reflash it for $200, or buy FlashTune’s ECU Flashing Kit – $380 – to program it yourself via your own computer and FT’s website. Naturally, I chose the easy way out; I ambled over to FlashTune (with the GSX’s computer in the Honda NC700X’s cargo bay). It took General Manager Kirk Doherty all of five minutes to plug the ECU into his desktop and flash; it didn’t take me much longer after I got home to plug it back into the Suzuki and be on my merry way.

I fired her up and was off to the MotoGP Werks dyno. I hadn’t expected any horsepower gain, really, since FT’s flash was programmed to work with a slip-on instead of the stock exhaust. (FT also offers a flash to work with a full exhaust system [which does away with the catalyst], but you’re not going to be riding that bike on the street in California now, are you?)

Really all we were trying to fix was the GSX-S’s abrupt throttle, and I’d say the reflash got us about 40% of the way there: Below 6000 rpm or so, rolling off the throttle a smidge for clutchless upshifts was smoother and better. Above 6000 or 7000 rpm, things were still a bit jerky. Wanting to be fair to FlashTune, who programmed this map to run with a slip-on pipe, (and always looking for an excuse to borrow things from Yoshimura), I fired off an email on the official MO letterhead, and was soon on my way to Chino to pick up a lovely Yosh Signature Series Alpha slip-on for the GSX-S in gleaming stainless steel and carbon fiber.

The Yosh slip-on is 50-state legal, since it slips on downstream of the catalyzer. It does flow a bit more air and is a tad gnarlier than the stocker, which actually has a pretty throaty growl of its own and is an amazingly nice object to affix to a $10,499 Suzuki.

The Yosh slip-on is 50-state legal, since it slips on downstream of the catalyzer. It does flow a bit more air and is a tad gnarlier than the stocker, which actually has a pretty throaty growl of its own and is an amazingly nice object to affix to a $10,499 Suzuki.

Through the Yosh pipe, you can see a red car driving down the street.

Through the Yosh pipe, you can see a red car driving down the street.

The stock can asks exhaust gases to bend a bit on their way out.

The stock can asks exhaust gases to bend a bit on their way out.

I blasted off for test two. Okay, this was more like it. With the Yosh pipe, the engine steady-state cruises with what feels like smaller throttle openings, runs better all through the powerband – and shifts even easier, with even less loss of revs when rolling out of the gas for clutchless or near-clutchless upshifts. The reduced abruptness when shifting really goes a long way toward making the bike feel more refined. Still, rolling the gas back on in the lower gears at corner exits can be a tad abrupt.

The Yosh Alpha pipe really did “slip on” perfectly, including the nice cosmetic cover that matches the Suzuki’s frame.

The Yosh Alpha pipe really did “slip on” perfectly, including the nice cosmetic cover that matches the Suzuki’s frame.

FlashTune says that’s sort of the nature of old-fashioned cable-operated injected bikes like the GSX-S, particularly powerful big-bore ones, and it’s hard to disagree. What they were able to do with our bike is give it a bit more fuel at various places to cure the factory-set leanness, dial back the SDTV valve a bit so it’s usually a tad more open than the factory settings, and advance ignition timing a bit at various points. All that makes it more responsive to the throttle and less abrupt even if it’s not perfect.

Tuned-Suzuki-GSX-S1000-hp-torque-dyno

Here’s what the MotoGP Werks dyno thinks. The light blue line is stock, the darker blue trace is ECU reflash only, and the red trace is reflash and Yosh pipe. Obviously, the reflash doesn’t radically alter the stock bike’s curve. The dips in power at 6000 and 8000 rpm (which might explain why the bike feels jerky as it climbs out of those holes) were reduced with both mods but not, like I’d hoped, eliminated. Flashtune’s Lead Developer Chris Gardell say he’s not sure what causes those dips and wishes he’d had more time to work with the bike. Us too for $200. Something in the airbox, something to reduce noise or emissions at those points, is his guess.

Peak power with the mods stays virtually the same, but the modified bike moves the peak from 11,400 rpm down to 10,400 rpm. Peak torque stays in the same place, around 9300 rpm, but as you can see, the modded bike enjoys a more robust torque curve, particularly around 7500 to 8000 rpm where the modded bike makes a few more pound-feet and 4 horsies more than before. The stock bike’s 41.3 mpg average was the best of our recent 6-bike comparison; the modded bike got right at 40 mpg on its first tank of fuel.

I’d say the GSX-S throttle abruptness is about 60 to 70% improved with the reflash and pipe, but even if we didn’t completely cure that, the bike does run happier, more responsively and smoother (though that could be partially because it’s got 5000 miles on it now). The bar buzziness some complained about seems to be about 80% less now.

Here’s what EiC Duke thinks after riding the reflashed bike: I was hoping for smoother throttle response from the mods made to the Gixxus, but the transition from closed throttle was still a little abrupt, especially at higher engine speeds. A stiffish throttle spring perhaps exacerbates the issue. But, aside from the too-sharp response, the K5-based mill is deliciously potent on the street, pulling easily from low revs and urgently howling through its midrange.

Not bad, really, for a $749 investment. For perfectionists, step two could be to go with FlashTune’s $380 reflashing kit, which enables unlimited modifications of the bike’s electronic parameters. As in, you might open up the airbox a bit, figure out what’s causing those dips in the torque curve and remove them… that might actually be fun if this was my bike, but this is Suzuki’s bike and so the fun must come to an end.

Is plugging in an ECU as much fun as pulling carburetors off and replacing jets and needles and springs and things? It’s a helluva lot cleaner, there are far fewer left-over parts and we’re even doing our part to keep the air clean by retaining the catalyzer.

Stock is nice too. (Evans Brasfield photo)

Stock is nice too. (Evans Brasfield photo)

For the record, FlashTune’s specialty is really ride-by-wire bikes, which offer much greater tuning latitude for the professional black-box hacker. The GSX-S, as you’d guess from its 143-hp stock output, wasn’t really very restricted, they say. The Yamaha R6, the first r-b-w production bike beginning in ’07, is FT’s pet project. And as more bikes become r-b-w – including the new GSX-R1000 that’s on its way now – Flashtune expects to keep very busy in the future, staying one step ahead of the very nimble manufacturers and the long arm of the law.

Playing with motorcycles is still fun, just now a different kind.

FlashTune
Yoshimura R&D
MotoGP Werks

  • DickRuble

    I sure hope they get the suspenders right this time and keep the weight under control. This looks just about perfect.

  • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

    Good on Yamaha. I test rode both the MT-09 and the MT-07 just last week in the UK and came away feeling the current platform suits the MT-07 better. It is a great urban bike. The MT-09’s engine I feel would work better in something like this: an all-rounder sport-tourer of the ilk that are so popular in Europe. Hopefully, though, Yamaha will sort out the MT-09’s awkward throttle issues before releasing the sport-touring version.

  • mrniceguy715

    I love my Fz-09 but this is what think my taste has moved too! maybe I could retrofit that center stand as I really miss having one.

  • ソロ アレックス

    Just puked a little bit inside my mouth!!!

  • DickRuble

    The chairman of Suzuki should call an all hands meeting and, in front of the hole audience, give the “GM design” award to the product manager for allowing this phenomenal piece of bland design and moronic engineering to see light. This rolling POS, as visionary as a 2003 Cheyv Equinox, is guaranteed to get you laughed at by owners of GSXR’s, ZX10Rs, and RSVFs as a wannabe. The other half of the motorcycle riding population, those appreciating smooth, well sorted out, comfortable bikes such as a Honda CB1100 will laugh you out for .. the same reason AND for being immature.

    It fits perfectly in the segment of bikes that nobody wants. AND it has a crappy throttle control. But, if spending thousands of bucks and aftermarket gizmos, dreaming that you can fix what tens of japanese engineers with PhDs couldn’t, on top of the already sunk $11K, you’ll be busy for a long time.

    • Gabriel Owens

      See these for 8999. Plus a grand for tuning, and I’d put 2k in the suspension cause I weigh a lot. So around 12k for a properly sorted bike ain’t bad imho.

      • DickRuble

        Except you’re smarter than that and got a CB1000R.

        • Gabriel Owens

          Brand new 2014 For 6895, who would pass on that. Suspension sent off to race tech, tuned at North Texas super bikes. Around 125 to the rear wheel, and it’s just so smooth. For the 10k invested….she’s a hoot!!

          • DickRuble

            ‘Brand new 2014 For 6895″ — that’s talk I understand.

          • Gabriel Owens

            They still have 3 more at that price. In Marshall texas.

          • Dale

            Dealer name?

    • Born to Ride

      The hole audience? I assume Suzuki can provide their employees with more comfortable accommodations that that. Or did you mean the entire audience?

      • DickRuble

        whole

        • Born to Ride

          I know that’s the whole you were referring to Dick.

  • Gabriel Owens

    I appreciate this one Burns. I was shopping this bike when I came across a cb1000r that was too good to pass up at the time. Still not regretting my decision after reading this article though. Which I guess is good. But still see a nice used Gixxus in my future. In a few years the “gurus” will have this bike deciphered.

    • Kevin Duke

      Don’t be in too much of a hurry to get rid of the 1000R, GO. It lacks the outright speed of the Gixxus, but it is still quite fast and feels about 75 lbs lighter, which is a nice quality in a motorcycle.

      • Gabriel Owens

        But they’re like women, I’m dying to try them all before I die.

    • Dale

      Is the cb1000rs throttle free of snatchiness, surging, abrupt on off throttle response etc. I am trying to find a bike to ride around on the street for fun that does not have a snatchy throttle? Does one exist? If so please advise what year, make, and model…thanks.

  • john phyyt

    An excellent article. Thanks so much. Remember a couple of things.
    When you modify a bike it becomes more “yours” after riding you can savor the little changes. After reading the chain cleaning article. I checked tire pressure, cleaned and lubed and straightened chain . And it felt really great. My Fz 09 is often criticized for throttle response. But it was a great buy and i began step by step mods. It is now flashed, exhaust, suspended, far differently from how it came from factory. All after others had tried and tested the mods.
    You can get used to a “snatchy” bike and it is even fun .
    Factories use lean running on closing/closed throttle for emission and consumption reasons and as this knowledge becomes more widespread you will get smoother results from reflash. I don’t laugh at anyone’s choice of motorcycle, at least they are out there riding. And cheaper is definitely better.

    • Kenneth

      “You can get used to a “snatchy” bike and it is even fun”

      I owned a snatchy Suzuki in 2004, and found it endlessly annoying to be perpetually accelerating or decelerating while simply trying to maintain a steady speed around town, or jerking back-and-forth when hitting small bumps. I added an electronic module from a well-known guy in NJ named Ivan, which simply didn’t work (and he didn’t want to talk about it after taking my money). No thanks.

      • john phyyt

        I guess we are talking about different things. When i bought the fz in 13 it had the earliest flash. In A mode it could hold speed pretty easily. But turn the throttle either way and it would react. You did have the option of less aggressive modes or riding in higher gear. But like that crazy ex girlfriend who would beg to do things you still dream about. IT WAS FUN ,sometimes.
        Now after full Akra and specific flash it makes more power and torque but it is easier to handle. More civilized.

    • DickRuble

      Has the throttle issue gone away completely? Is yours 2015 or 2014?

      • john phyyt

        I only ride this bike. So am only comparing to previous flashes, But because tuners have run these bikes on dynos perhaps 50 or more times you can get specific flashes for what you have . Ie exhaust, air filter, etc. I really love my bike which is very early bought nov 13.
        There is a lot of knowledge, about both low and higher speed fueling and ignition circuits. As well as fuel cut off , there is air injection into exhaust, and transition between closed and open throttle and also low and high speed circuits. To answer your question. Mine now defaults to A mode and it can trickle in traffic in lower gears , whilst looking for gaps with clutch fully engaged and easily pull a controlled whellie around a tight corner. It is transformed. No throttle issue i am happy to let my son ride it. But maybe others are better? I test rode a Fz -10. Only in std mode. I didn’t find that throttle response was an issue , but in second gear side by side. At 30 . If we both nailed it my fz would leap forward perhaps a bike length before the bigger surged passed. And I really like that

  • HazardtoMyself

    I picked up the Gixxus a few months back. Just saw one in a dealer, took it for a ride and felt the bike fit me well.

    For the price, I don’t think it can be beat. CB1000 doesn’t have ABS or TC, Z1000 a little more expensive and I don’t care for the seat or the peg position. S1000R, Tuono and FZ-10 a lot more money.

    5000 miles in and I like it. Sure could have spent a few grand more for a few more gadgets. Riding 20,000+ miles a year though, wanted something with upright ergos, plenty of power for fun and occasional pillion, without breaking the bank.

    Seems the early model has more of an ECU issue than newer builds. Suzuki is starting to swap them in other parts of the world.

    Mine may not be as smooth as the Beemer or Aprilla, but it doesn’t have me rushing in for a replacement ECU just yet either.

    • DickRuble

      And every day you get on your bike you wish it were an Aprilia.. Every time you squeeze the throttle your brain will wonder what it would be like on the Aprilia..

      • HazardtoMyself

        Oh yeah, the reviews are great. Sat on one, but haven’t ridden one yet. From just sitting, liked the ergos of the Gixxus more. For $6-$7k less it was a bargain and had what I was looking for.

        And Dick, yeah yeah I know, excuses from someone who wishes they had a Tuono…. Maybe next time.

        • DickRuble

          Just ribbing you..I wish I could ride 20K miles a year. Maybe all is not lost.. It may be the FC issue that has been around since 2006 on some bikes and there may be a cure. Something that unlocks the true potential of the bike. Sometimes an old fashioned carburetor has its advantages.

          • Gabriel Owens

            Move to Texas, average 3k miles a month. It only gets wet or Hot, never cold enough to make me stop riding. Own a cb1000r and a yamaha fjr1300. Traded in a 2016 ktm adventure for the fjr. Ktm was great bike fjr fits me better. After I dog the crap out of these 2 bikes I’m really thinking about a Gixxus. By then they’ll have a good tune and race tech will offer stuff for the suspension. I think about 12k to outfit right. That’s my plan. I’m might tour on it and that time my back up bike is going to be the crf250l. I think ol Burns did a review on it. Light slow bikes with offroad intentions do great where I live in the Sabine national forest. But you don’t see a lot of riders.

          • DickRuble

            3000 miles a month is a lot. I used to live in Houston, TX 20 years ago. Went back two years ago and things have changed a lot. The heat was the only thing that was the same.

            2016 ktm adventure 1190 is one of the top 3 bikes on my list. Can’t imagine someone would trade it in.

          • Gabriel Owens

            I owned a 2014 1190 and a 2016 1290 super adventure. Both stayed in the shop a lot. I was all too eager to leave ktm for Yamaha/Honda.

          • DickRuble

            That’s great input! Africa twin it is then.

          • Kevin Duke

            I like those bikes, but, then, I don’t have to get them serviced. Interested to hear why yours were out of commission?

          • Gabriel Owens

            2014 had an issue with the airbox. It’s a widely known issue with the 2014-2016 1190’s. At least widely known on the forums. Ingesting dirt bad for the serious offroad guys. My 1290 was trouble from day one. Bad wobble from 40-50 mph. Bad laces on front wheel. 3 replaced fuel sending units in 3 months. Factory bags froze up while on a trip with all my stuff inside. Permanently locked on me. Had to get the internals replaced. False neutrals from 5th to 6th is what finally did me in. 8 times one day. I finally had had enough of the 20k bike that had way too many issues from the factory. Especially considering I go on 4-5k mile solo trips. Leaving Texas Wednesday for Redding California. Any recommendations on roads to ride in that area on a fjr

          • Kevin Duke

            All those issues would sour me, too! I might forgive the wheel problem, and maybe the bag, too, for the same reason, as those are supplier build problems, but the problematic fuel sending units would piss me off. The airbox thing was a factory retrofit at no charge, right?

          • Gabriel Owens

            Yes. Everything that occurred was under warranty. The 2014 airbox was replaced with a 2016 model plus k&n filter. Problem is, the retro fit ingested dirt particles too. So I got a fair deal on an upgrade to the more expensive 1290. Then it had problems, so you can see it went south quickly. But I loved both bikes. Actually think I liked the 1190 a little more. The drivetrain and all the cpu’s on those bikes are PERFECT, I just couldn’t get past the frustration. Many men will not be bothered by the small problems. It’s like having a really beautiful girlfriend, a lot to maintain but the payoff is worth it….for some. I like down to earth chicks.

          • HazardtoMyself

            Only problem I see with long touring on the Gixxus is there are not a lot of bag options, The pillion seat really lacks any space / comfort for long hauls if not going solo.

            Suzuki stated no intention for hard bags as that is what the bandit is for. There are a few after market soft sets and some owners have got creative building rear racks.

            The FJR is on top of my short list for after the kids are grown and I can really start long haul touring more often.

          • Gabriel Owens

            I have a waterproof wolf adventure roll bag that carries an insane amount of stuff. I can strap that thing to any motorcycle known to man. Side bags on the fjr are nice but can only carry just so much. Not really alot. But I always travel light. Few clothes, tool kit, tire plug kit, stay dry stuff, air gauge. That’s about all.

          • HazardtoMyself

            Oh I know man.

            I hope someone does figure it out sometime in the future. Seems as more builders strive for Euro 4 certification the worse throttle response is getting all around.

            I just don’t get it. Damn near any older stock bike I have ever had was near undetectable on state emission machines. How much cleaner do they need to be and at what price?

  • Born to Ride

    I think the Suzy is definitely the handsomest of all the current Japanese offerings to this segment by a fair margin. But the speed triple just seems like a better bike all around if you can pony up an extra 2500$ and don’t mind losing 20 peak horsepower. I admit, if not for the throttle and the “steady” handling, it would be the best bargain in the sport-bike-for-the-road market.

    • HazardtoMyself

      I’m not the strongest mechanic in the world, so a lot of the major services I used to have dealers perform.

      I used to get all my service done at a dealer named GO AZ motorcycles in Scottsdale Az. Not trying to plug them, but they gave great service and fair prices on my street and dirt bikes. Their service group was the best I ever dealt with.

      They carried all the European brands and Honda, Kawasaki, etc.

      At one point I started considering different bikes from Ducati, BMW, Triumph, all of which they sold.

      Very bluntly their service and sales guys told me, “with the amount you ride, stick to the Japanese bikes unless you are ready to spend thousands more on the bike, servicing it and repairs every year”.

      To me, that put the nail in the coffin on euro bikes for my daily riders. To have a dealership who knew I would be back to them for everything steer me towards a less expensive bike spoke volumes.

      • Born to Ride

        I have put 25 thousand miles on my Sprint ST in a year and a half. recently had the valves checked, no adjustment needed. Replaced the fork seals and the fluids myself, and the bike runs great. Look online at used Sprints and Tigers for sale with 40-50-60 thousand miles on them. I’d put the big triumph triple up against any Japanese motor in reliability due to its moderate state of tune, and 20+ year refined design. As for Ducati… If you can’t work on your own bike at all, you will pay more. But I have seen Air cooled Ducatis (ST and Multistradas) with north of 80k miles with no need for any repairs other than routine maintenance according to their owners. Water cooled Ducatis can be quite costly to repair as they live in a high state of tune, making them more prone to mechanical failure.

        • HazardtoMyself

          I don’t think there are a lot of bad bikes anymore. There are some things I can do and others others I leave to the professionals.

          One of the mechanics I used was a big Suzuki guy while I rode kawis and Hondas at the time. He had 250k on a bandit and 300k on a busa. I’m sure with the right care alot of bikes can do it.

          I am just one of those who prefers to ride over wrench.
          Just not patient enough for the big jobs I guess. Rather drop it on the way to work and pickup on the way home for a little more reasonable rate.

  • Jordan Marcelo

    I am not an expert but I recently did read about this from an expert. What you are experiencing with the abruptness from Off-Throttle is a condition referred to as “fuel-cut”. FC is EPA mandated to cut fuel flow to the engine when the throttle is closed, because this is a waste of fuel. But when the rider begins to open the throttle, the fuel suddenly has to come back on of course. There are various ways to smooth this out but a lower end bike like the GSX may not have this in its repertoire since it is after all, an older engine design. So what you want to do is eliminate the FC command coming from your ECU. Ideally, you want SOME fuel to keep flowing even at closed throttle so when you transition to open throttle the event happens much smoother. Eliminating FC for some reason cannot be done by a Power Commander. Refer to experts on how this can be done…..a stand alone device perhaps? Sorry I couldn’t be of further help.

    • Born to Ride

      This has been “Ivan’s” method for a number of years. Some bikes respond to it better than others. For example, the Ninja 1000 with an exhaust system and a reflash with FCE(fuel cut eliminate) picks up 20+ horsepower and alleviates every complaint about the engine, vibration, abruptness, and soft top end. Also you get to run 89 octane fuel to boot!

      • Gabriel Owens

        One of my own bikes went from 109 at the wheel to 126. I was happy. But the biggest difference to me that tuning makes is in smoothing out the curves and fixing the rough edges.

      • Craig Hoffman

        Ivan has an excellent reflash for the Gen 2 FZ1 (’06 and later) that transforms the bike. It is like it has a perfect set of carbs on it. Back to the future!

    • DickRuble

      Do you happen to remember the place you read it? I seem to remember it from a couple of moths ago but cannot remember where.

      • Born to Ride

        Perhaps a couple of moths came and ate the printed article that you read it in. I hear they like to eat stuff like clothes and whatnot.

      • Jordan Marcelo

        This is the guy who explained this in VFR Discussion. His website explains what he does to bikes. He seems to know what he’s doing.

        http://rapidbike.us/

  • John B.

    Great article John. I understand the problem, but not the cause. What causes this problem, and would Suzuki have to make mechanical alterations to the engine (in addition to the reflash) to eliminate the problem?

  • DickRuble

    What’s the best sorted fuel injected bike on the market? What’s the bike with the smoothest, most perfect, linear throttle control?

    • Gabriel Owens

      A lot of the new triumphs.

      But the throttle control and traction control of the ktms are also very impressive.

    • Mark Vizcarra

      Harley

      • DickRuble

        Hilarious….

    • Dale

      I would like to know also…please advise year, name, and model.

  • aaMOron

    Before spending $200 on a reflash or even more for a Power Commander, I would try out a G2 Throttle Tamer. This is a replacement throttle tube with a different throttle cable cam profile to make the initial cable take up smoother and more gradual. I had one on my 2013 V-strom 650 and it took probably 80% of the abruptness out. With just 60 something ponies on tap, this was never a safety issue, I just did it to make it less annoying. $80 is a lot for a throttle tube, but it is nicely machined and turns on delrin bushings, so throttle action will be noticeably smoother. Im also running rheir quick turn throttle on my Grom and am pleased with it on that application.

  • SRMark

    I don’t see much of anything in the chart. Not for $750. Maybe it sounds better. And looks are about the same. I’d buy a Yosh T-shirt.