2015 Yamaha R3

Editor Score: 85.5%
Engine 17.0/20
Suspension/Handling 12.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 7.0/10
Brakes 7.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 10.0/10
Desirability 10.0/10
Value 10.0/10
Overall Score85.5/100

Yamaha’s been on a roll lately, with bikes like the FZ-09, FJ-09 and FZ-07 stealing headlines by proving that affordable and competent motorcycles aren’t synonymous with dull and boring. If that wasn’t enough, Yamaha also unleashed the new YZF-R1 and R1M to the masses, showing the world in one swift kick how far it can push the boundaries of technology on two wheels.

AIMExpo 2014: 2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 Coming To America

Combine these models with the Tuning Fork’s existing street lineup, and Yamaha’s portfolio is looking rather complete for the burgeoning street/sporty rider … except for one glaring area: it has nothing to offer newbs. That all ends now with the introduction of the R3 to the U.S. market.

Yamaha reps admit the brand has had a hole to fill in the beginner market. Despite seeing the success Kawasaki was raking in for about three decades with its baby Ninjas, Yamaha decided to wait.

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

Then, when Honda released the CBR250R (and later CBR300R), the waiting continued. Making the situation more aggravating for American riders is the R25, Yamaha’s 250cc answer to the baby CBR and Ninja, not available Stateside. As an interesting aside, according to Yamaha, in the past 12 months the R6 and R1 were the top two sellers in the sportbike category, respectively.

Personally, I think the Yamaha R3 is the best looking beginner bike on the market today. When trying to attract new buyers in hopes of keeping them loyal to the brand, this is an important first step.

Personally, I think the Yamaha R3 is the best looking beginner bike on the market today. When trying to attract new buyers in hopes of keeping them loyal to the brand, this is an important first step.

The tide has started to shift, however, with MIC numbers revealing the sub-500cc category doubling in sales over the past five years and more consumers in the sport/supersport genre purchasing the former over the latter. With this information, Yamaha felt it was finally the right time to fill in the hole in its small displacement lineup. The aim was simple, too – make this bike better than the Godfather of the beginner bike crop, Kawasaki’s Ninja 300.

In this simple experience chart, plotting the amount of riding experience its competitor’s bikes are ideal for, Yamaha isn’t outright naming its competitors for the R3, but it kinda is.

In this simple experience chart, plotting the amount of riding experience its competitor’s bikes are ideal for, Yamaha isn’t outright naming its competitors for the R3, but it kinda is.

Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better

This is no easy task, as the Ninja hasn’t earned the status it has by being dull. However, the best place to start is with the engine. At 320.6cc, the DOHC parallel-Twin outclasses Kawasaki’s Twin by 25cc and is the same unit seen in the R25, punched out to a 68.0mm bore (vs. 60.0mm on the 250). Stroke stays the same at 44.2mm. A 1.2-liter airbox feeds 32mm Mikuni throttle bodies, with 12-hole injectors feeding atomized fuel. The mixture passes through twin 26mm intake valves, where the forged aluminum pistons (you read that right) squeeze the mixture to an 11.2:1 compression ratio, and after the explosion, twin 22.5mm exhaust valves let the spent gasses escape to the two-into-one exhaust with three-way catalytic converter before escaping into the atmosphere.

2015 Honda CBR300R First Ride Review

Like the R1 flagship, cylinders on the R3 are offset to reduce mechanical losses due to piston/cylinder friction. Unlike the R1, however, the R3 uses a more common, 180-degree crankshaft and not the 270-degree crossplane crank like its FZ-07 stablemate. Yamaha says the advantage of the crossplane crank is to allow the rider to better manage high horsepower. Since the R3 makes relatively little power in comparison (approximately 42 hp according to Yamaha Europe), the crossplane crank wasn’t necessary. Plus, the 180-degree crank allows for a much lighter primary balancer.

Lurking underneath the bodywork is a 320.6cc parallel-Twin, with closed-loop fuel injection, four valves per cylinder, aluminum pistons, and offset cylinders. You know what it doesn’t have? A crossplane crankshaft.

Lurking underneath the bodywork is a 320.6cc parallel-Twin, with closed-loop fuel injection, four valves per cylinder, aluminum pistons, and offset cylinders. You know what it doesn’t have? A crossplane crankshaft.

Things get slightly more traditional from here, with the engine being housed as a stressed member in a steel frame. Swingarm is steel, too, but not your standard box-section unit. Yamaha went the extra mile and stylized it a bit. KYB provides suspension at both ends; a 41mm fork and seven-way preload adjustable shock handling bump duties with 130mm and 125mm of travel, respectively. Some weight savings comes in the way of cast aluminum 10-spoke wheels, with 110/70-17 front, 140/70-17 rear Michelin Pilot Street rubber made specifically for the R3. A single 298mm disc is greeted with an Akebono twin-piston caliper. A single 220mm disc and single-piston caliper rest out back.

Not Your Average Beginner Bike

All told, the R3, with its 3.7-gallon tank fully fueled, comes in at 368 lbs., says Yamaha, 11.3 lbs. lighter than the Ninja 300 (4.5-gallon tank), but also 11 lbs. heavier than the CBR300R (3.4-gallon tank). It’s hard to tell any difference without the other bikes to compare side-by-side, but what I did notice was how narrow and nimble the R3 feels between my legs. To test its ride qualities, Yamaha invited journos to Thunderhill Raceway in Willows, California, where we’d sample the bike on both the street and T-Hill’s new West track.

Seating position is comfy on the R3. Bars are high and the pegs low.

Seating position is comfy on the R3. Bars are high and the pegs low.

On the road, the R3 is pleasantly surprising for a beginner bike. Clutch pull is light and easy, and a short first gear makes it easy to ditch the traffic behind you once the light turns green. Gears are nicely spaced, and compared to a Ninja 300, there’s a noticeable difference in power throughout the rev range.

Discuss this at our Yamaha R3 Forum.

The R3 can cruise easily at 80 mph in sixth gear, with plenty more revs available to overtake slower vehicles. Redline is a lofty 12,500 rpm. For kicks, I lurched down to 25 mph in sixth, opened the throttle, and the engine pulled cleanly up the revs. A progressive throttle pulley means ham-fisted new riders won’t get into as much trouble when they accidentally go WFO, though experienced riders would likely prefer a more direct pulley. That said, fuelling is spot-on. Riders young and old will appreciate the R3’s power – it’s still tame enough for a beginner, yet manages to be entertaining for an older rider who may be stepping down to something more manageable.

A single 298mm disc up front does the bulk of the stopping duties with its Akebono two-piston caliper. Note also the 10-spoke cast aluminum wheel and Michelin Pilot Street rubber.

A single 298mm disc up front does the bulk of the stopping duties with its Akebono two-piston caliper. Note also the 10-spoke cast aluminum wheel and Michelin Pilot Street rubber.

Clip-ons are placed above the triple clamp, giving the rider a sporty but still relatively upright position. There’s also a little room to scoot about in the seat and the pegs aren’t too high, either. However, this is coming from someone who’s 5-foot, 8 inches. That said, some 6-footers on our ride didn’t have any complaints about seating position.

Once into the twisty bits, the R3’s low 368-lb curb weight and the cast aluminum wheels help the bike turn with ease. The suspension is tuned for sporty-ish riding, and the KYB components did an admirable job dealing with the bumps. They started to lose their composure though when the quick pace was combined with rough patches of road. For the level of rider the R3 is aimed at, however, the components are just fine. Despite only having a single disc in front, braking duties didn’t leave much to be desired on the street. They’re surely not R1 units, but feel and power are on par with the Honda and Kawi.

Yamaha calls the R3’s styling concept “R-DNA” and includes a mass-forward silhouette, “up-cutting” tail section, twin headlights and R6-inspired aerodynamic design.

Yamaha calls the R3’s styling concept “R-DNA” and includes a mass-forward silhouette, “up-cutting” tail section, twin headlights and R6-inspired aerodynamic design.

Trackday Fun

Even though only a small percentage of R3 owners will take their bikes to the track, Yamaha treated us to some hot laps around Thunderhill’s new West track. The two-mile course is tight and twisty, with plenty of elevation changes and a few blind corners. Basically, it’s perfect for the R3.

2013 Kawasaki Ninja 300 Review

With the growing resurgence in small displacement motorcycles in the racing scene once again, that small percentage of R3 riders who do track their bikes will be delighted to know it’s a great tool for the up-and-coming racer.

From big to small, an R-series Yamaha has to be able to hold its own on a racetrack. The R3 succeeds in that mission.

From big to small, an R-series Yamaha has to be able to hold its own on a racetrack. The R3 succeeds in that mission.

The light and nimble handling characteristics seen on the street directly translate to the track, with quick and easy direction changes. The engine builds power as the revs continue to climb, tapering off approximately 1000 revs shy of its 12,500 rpm redline. More impressive is its pull coming out of slow corners, as T-Hill West has a few extremely slow, tight bends taken in second gear on the R3. On occasion, I’d botch a downshift and lug through in third. To my delight, the Twin would pull nicely without any fuss.

Were I to build a track R3, I’d address tires, suspension, brakes and slipper clutch. Michelin’s Pilot Street rubber reveals its intended environment right in its name. The silica-rich compound makes it a great street tire as it warms up quickly, but when pushed its edge grip is adequate at best. That said, suspension is adequately calibrated to the limits of the bike with those tires and the smooth surface of the track.

The R3’s standard components make it a fun track toy, but a few choice pieces could exploit its performance potential fully.

The R3’s standard components make it a fun track toy, but a few choice pieces could fully exploit its performance potential.

With stickier rubber, you could brake later, accelerate earlier, carry more corner speed and lean further. Then you’d need more compression and rebound damping to cope. With relatively little power in stock form, when pushed to its limits the rear chatters and slides when knee-dragging lean is met with throttle. Luckily, it communicates this early and often, giving the rider plenty of notice to dial it back a notch.

Sub-300cc Sporty Bike Shootout + Video

After repeated hot laps, the brake lever would start to edge closer to the bar but eventually settled into a consistent position. The bigger issue here, however, is the lack of a slipper clutch. Its omission (and that of ABS) was done to meet a price point, but downshifting from high speeds requires perfect rev-matching and careful clutch operation to keep the rear from dancing all over the pavement.

Despite what you see above, knee-dragging lean angles are entirely possible with the stock R3.

Despite what you see above, knee-dragging lean angles are entirely possible with the stock R3.

With the possible exception of the slipper clutch, these are minor issues to address. The R3 proves to have solid street chops, and its racetrack speed is likely to exceed that of its Japanese competitors. Clearly, a showdown is in order, including the single-cylinder KTM RC390

Stepping Up To The Plate

Yamaha might have taken its sweet time introducing a beginner sportbike to the U.S. market, but the R3 doesn’t disappoint. With strong, yet manageable power that blows away its (Japanese) rivals, riders of all levels will get a kick out of it. A low seat height and nimble chassis just sweetens the deal. With pricing set at $4,990, the R3 is positioned just below the Ninja 300 ($4,999) and below the $5,499 KTM is asking for the RC390, which includes ABS as standard, a safety feature not offered on the R3.

It might have taken Yamaha a while to bring a beginner bike to the U.S., but the wait was well worth it.

It might have taken Yamaha a while to bring a beginner bike to the U.S., but the wait was well worth it.

Available in Raven, Team Yamaha Blue/Matte Silver, or Rapid Red, Yamaha hopes to have bikes in dealers as soon as labor issues on America’s western ports are resolved. Until then, rest assured Yamaha has hit yet another home run in the R3.

+ Highs

  • Large spread of power throughout rev range
  • Light and nimble
  • $9 cheaper than the Ninja 300!
– Sighs

  • Tires are limiting factor if the track is your destination
  • Put on a slipper clutch ASAP
  • ABS unavailable
2015 Yamaha YZF-R3 Specifications
Engine Type 321cc, liquid-cooled 2-cylinder DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Bore x Stroke 68.0 x 44.1mm
Compression Ratio 11.2:1
Fuel Delivery Fuel Injected
Ignition TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission Constant mesh; 6-speed transmission
Final Drive Chain
Suspension / Front 41mm KYB telescopic fork; 5.1 in of travel
Suspension / Rear KYB single shock; 4.9 in of travel
Brakes Front Hydraulic, 298mm
Brakes / Rear Hydraulic, 220mm
Tires / Front 110/70-17M/C 54H
Tires Rear 140/70-17M/C 66H
L x W x H 82.3 x 28.3 x 44.7 in
Seat Height 30.7 in
Wheelbase 54.3 in
Rake (Caster Angle) 25°
Trail 3.7 in
Fuel Capacity 3.7 gal
Fuel Economy 56 (claimed)
Wet Weight 368 lb
Warranty 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
MSRP $4,990 – Raven – Available from January 2015
$4,990 – Team Yamaha Blue/Matte Silver – Available from January 2015
$4,990 – Rapid Red – Available from January 2015

Free Insurance Quote

Enter your ZIP code below to get a free insurance quote.

Yamaha Dealer Price Quote

Get price quotes for Yamaha from local motorcycle dealers.

Yamaha Communities

  • 12er

    Sweet little bike, I dug it at the IMS.

  • scoobs

    what u mean by port issues

    • Josh

      I’m assuming he means port issues (as in seaport) are delaying the bike’s arrival to dealership showrooms

      • TroySiahaan

        Correct. Labor disputes are having a big impact not just with bikes, but with all products brought in by boat to the western U.S.

  • Justin

    To get this out of the way, no abs as an option on a beginner bike in 2015 is ridiculous. There I said it.

    • Rocket Punch

      Some states still have a no helmet laws if you want to talk ridiculous.

      You can add all kinds of safety stuff to the bike, but you can’t fix stupidity; a positive riding attitude towards safety will save far more people on the road than ABS can ever could.

      • KHoward

        Attitude is important: So is ABS. Just one misjudgment, and the price you pay can be very dear. ABS can help you learn your limits, lower injury and fatality rates, and draw more new riders into the sport.

        • Josh

          Which is why Daimyo is saying it’s ridiculous to not have an ABS option on an entry-level bike such as this.

        • Daimyo

          Attitude is very important, I agree with you there.

          I was a new rider not long ago and very proud of the fact that I rode safely, generally attempted not to be a douchebag and to respect other drivers on the road.

          There is one instance I remember very specifically where my ABS engaged during a panic stop as a white SUV swerved across 3 lanes of traffic attempting to take an exit off the highway (things like this happen often here in MA, people drive with an absolute disregard for others safety). The ABS engaged hard and it likely saved me from a catastrophic crash and possibly my own death.

          As much as we as riders like to speak about mindfulness and attitude, in certain situation, either due to traffic flow, congestion or just the pure stupidity of certain other drivers you don’t always have the time or the ability to come to a safe, controlled stop, and it is in those situations where having ABS is an added layer of security that can literally save your a**.

      • Josh

        I’ve never been on a bike with ABS, but the more I ride (I don’t have a car so I ride often and in the midst of rush hour traffic) the more I understand what ABS is good for. With good braking skills you won’t need it, but it’s worth it for those times when you mess up. Or when the road is not ideal.

        • john burns

          what it’s good for is when somebody pulls into your path out of the blue and everything you learned goes out the window and you instinctively slam on the brakes as hard as you can I don’t care HOW skilled you are. Which only happens every ten years or so if you’re lucky.

          • Craig Hoffman

            Good point. When in difficult surroundings, I ride keep a couple fingers over the front brake. When presented with unexpected and sudden mortal danger, the body instinctively clenches, ass and hands. Funny how that is – anyone who has ridden for awhile knows this. The clenched ass is of no help of course, other than soiled underwear prevention, but the quick clenched hand connected to the front brake can make all the difference, ABS can only assist in this endeavor.

          • Martin Buck

            It happened to me once long ago. while riding a Honda XL350 in downtown traffic. With the pathetic drum front brake I had no chance of stopping in time, so I threw the bike sideways and held it in an upright skid until just before impact, when I released the brakes. This shot me behind the car and I was able to go around. The lady driver was shaking and crying, stuck in the middle of the road. I just smiled, nodded, and went on by.

          • therr850

            That was so right in my case. I practiced hard braking every few rides and felt confident I was good. I’ve taken three MSF rider courses and thought I had it figured out. Then, one day, a guy ran a stop sign at a blind intersection less than fifty feet in front of me and all that practice went away. I SLAMMED on that front brake, locked it solid and did a slow roll to the pavement. Thank God he was doing over 55 mph and I slid past behind him. I was doing lees than fifty mph on a rural road. How do you keep the uncontrolled panic at bay? ABS is good.

          • Mason4000

            Glad to see there are people like you out there. The anti-ABS arguments are not only ridiculous, but laughable.

            Some of my favorites:

            “Learn how to properly brake!”

            What does this mean? How does one prepare for a driver flying through a stop light? Furthermore, all ABS does is prevent the locking up of brakes. That’s like saying I know how to drive safely, so I don’t need a seat-belt or traction control.

            “I’ve been riding for years and never needed ABS”

            Okay…..And? Now you can buy a bike that may enhance your safety.

            “ABS is for sissies”

            Does this even need a rebuttal?

      • Jason

        Yes it is. Yamaha could have easily offered the non-ABS version at $5000 and an ABS version at $5,500. That would allow them to compete both with the higher priced KTM and the lower prices Kawasaki and Honda.

    • Daniel

      Not learning how to use the brakes properly in 2015 is ridiculous! And btw…the ABS on the Ninja 300 is absolutely trash and while it “maaay” save you in a straight line on a dry day, but its useless in the wet or in curves because the ABS cycles so slowly and so abruptly. Any even modestly experienced rider can easily outbrake the system. I haven’t tested the CBR’s ABS, but I’d assume its shit as well. I’ve read good things about the KTM’s though. Seriously though, learn how to brake!

      • SteveSweetz

        “Any even modestly experienced rider can easily outbrake the system.”

        Sure, in a parking lot, after a half-dozen tries.

        How about when a car, kid, or deer jumps into your path? You can tell yourself you’re a practiced and accomplished brakesman all you want. You can’t simulate actual surprise.

        • Daniel

          You can add an element of surprise or panic to your practice stops if you get creative. Do it enough times and you will instinctively know how hard you can brake. Once you learn that, locking up the brakes won’t be an option and you will be able to judge your braking distances effectively. I’ve saved myself from countless scenarios with my braking skills.

          I’m against ABS on these entry-level bikes because they are absolute trash and work horribly. They give riders a false sense of security and then they begin to rely on them. On the other hand, I’ve ridden the S1000RR and the ABS works phenomenally…that one could absolutely save you in a crash.

          Still though, I feel like these aids are just dumbing down the average rider and I am not a proponent of that. If you’re going to ride a sportbike then you better be able to control it properly. Have a cruiser or sport tourer or whatever else? Fine, get your ABS…most of those people ride sensibly anyways.

          • SteveSweetz

            “They give riders a false sense of security and then they begin to rely on them.”

            Says who, exactly? At best you have anecdotal knowledge of maybe a couple riders. More likely you’re making completely baseless assumptions about an entire market to support your POV.

          • Daniel

            Baseless you say? How many people can brake at the limit of traction? If you cannot, then you are relying on magic, faith, ABS, or something else.

          • Mason4000

            How does one learn how to prepare for a truck running a light? Go to an empty parking lot? And your argument against ABS is that it “may” save you (as it pertains to the Ninja) as opposed to not at all? I think I’ll take the “may”.

            Where does this “false sense of security” argument arise from? Does it work or does it not?

            I’m not sure I understand your “dumbing down argument”. All ABS does is prevent the wheel from locking up. One can still learn to brake properly and “control” the bike otherwise. You even said yourself it’s not a complete guarantee of anything.

            Also, can you post the tests detailing that ABS on entry level bikes is garbage.

  • Craig Hoffman

    Yamaha is getting with it. Another cool new model. Well done. Now bring us a WR450R dual sport. I know you can.

  • Diesel Driver

    Make a standard, sit up straight version and I’ll be interested. I can’t lean on my wrists and I’m not a road racer. I don’t even care to pretend to be one. I want a comfortable, reliable bike with a big gas tank and a comfortable seating position. Sounds like they’ve got 3/4 of what I want here. Put a rack on it instead of the passenger portion of the seat and I’d like it even better.

    • Gee S

      you’re describing the sr400, which, despite the writers protests to the contrary, is a beginner bike that yammie sold before this and still sells.

  • cbolling

    If Yamaha wants to sell me a new bike in 2015 they need to offer ABS.

  • abe

    no monocross at rear suspension

  • jon wong

    Oh, stop bitching and just enjoy this 5k work of art. When was this type of bike when I started in 2000?

  • http://trendsmartphone.com/ far nai

    Yamaha motorcycles 2015…
    R3 Like r25 From Indoneian

  • Daniel

    Can’t believe people are bitching about the ABS. Seriously learn how to fucking brake like we’ve all been doing for the last century. If you need to RELY on ABS on a motorcycle then maybe you shouldn’t be on one.

    • SteveSweetz

      Having ABS does not equal relying on ABS. Just like wearing a helmet doesn’t mean you slam your cranium into the pavement every time you go riding.

      Regardless of how you feel about it, it’s not some fancy, elusive technology now. Honda and Kawaski offer it on their cheap bikes for a few hundred dollars. Yamaha is behind their competition in this respect, period.

      • Daniel

        I agree that it doesn’t mean you MUST rely on ABS, but that doesn’t stop new and/or irresponsible riders from relying on it.

        You may not have ridden the Ninja 300 with ABS. I can assure you that the system is horrible. It could save you on a dry day when riding completely upright…but add in any lean angle or a wet rode or gravel and it will not work. The ABS cycles soooooooooo slowly and intrusively…it is really the cheapest ABS that Kawasaki could have thrown onto this bike. The ABS is not “functional” and merely a marketing gimmick so people can have a greater sense of security. Now, I’ve also ridden much more expensive bikes like the S1000RR and the ABS works phenomenally there…I have no problems with that system. I am glad that Yamaha did not add a cheap $500 piece of shit ABS option. It does not help anybody

        • SteveSweetz

          “It does not help anybody”

          Except a rider on straight road on a dry day, who panic brakes when a car pulls out in front of them.

          Suggesting that it’s use or inclusion is invalidated because it’s not a perfect system in every condition is bad logic. A helmet won’t save you from every crash, but you should still wear one.

          Also even if I trust you have the requisite expertise to judge Kawasaki’s ABS system, just because theirs is bad doesn’t mean everything else in the same price range is as well.

          • Daniel

            It seems like you are set in your ways. Don’t mean to be a downer or anything, but at this price point most bikes will have a basic ABS that will hardly offer any functionality. The KTM I’ve read adjusts for lean angle as well. My buddy had one pre-ordered a long time ago (should be coming in any day now) and said he’ll let me take a rip on it so that should be interesting.

            I guess to me its not worth the extra $500 especially since braking is probably my best skill on a motorcycle. I’m after maximum performance for the money and the marginal benefit this ABS provides is just so sad.

            I’m all for better rider training and I have complete faith that a rider with enough practice can very easily beat these “cheap” ABS systems even in panic situations. Unfortunately, that’s not the reality these days. People would rather spend their money on gadgetry than actual rider training. Just my 0.02

            Ride safe. Keep the rubber side down!

          • My name

            Please bring back the 2 strokes!

          • http://google.com Kaha

            Agree 100%

          • Daniel

            On another note. That $500 would best be spent on tires and suspension upgrades in my opinion.

            Pirelli Diablo Rosso II’s (~$300) will give you the best grip in this size range aside from Bridgestone BT003RS which don’t last very long (maybe 3k miles) and last nearly as long as the stock tires. You’ll be able to “grab” the front brake and endo (or stoppie) very easily. In fact, flipping over your bike…rather than lowsiding from the front wheel locking up will become a reality.

            A Racetech Gold Valve Cartridge Emulator Kit ($150) will prevent the forks from bottoming out under heavy braking (very common on these entry-level sportbikes) and give better traction all-around as well as a smoother ride. Bottoming out under braking is extremely dangerous and will cause you to lose traction very quickly if the rider does not adjust appropriately (something ABS does not account for).

            I hope you rethink this ABS thing and focus on some rider training!

  • Vaibhavsharmacantuserealname

    Ktm rc 390 is also going to be updated with slipper clutch at the end of the year like duke 390 was updated a shortwhile ago. 500$ extra for the ktm with abs and slipper clutch doesn’t sound bad.

  • http://google.com Kaha

    People have been learning on and driving motorcycles without this ABS’s and Slipper clutches for decades.

    In today’s entry level bikes I would rather have a quality built motorbike rather than a watered down fully featured bike. I think Yamaha knows what they are doing, and who they are targeting with this bike.

    People make worst mistakes on a bike mostly not in when a surprising situation comes in but when they try to do something with a bike in the wrong environment and also try to do something the bike is not meant for. If you are getting a motorbike to learn, do just that. LEARN! And when you feel you are ready to move up and you have accordingly and knowingly pushed your “learner bike (and yourself)” to its designed limits. Stop right there, stop pushing and get a bike designed to handle higher i/o.

    Most important thing about learning how to ride a motorcycle is not trying to just figure out what the bikes limits are but also your own. From there you have to workout your weak-points and further enhance your strengths; all at a best possible even level.

    Riding motorcycles is a pleasure and luxury experience!

    While all enhancements, both mechanically and technologically are welcome to provide a safer and more enjoyable machine. Like everything else, such issue of safety is mostly left up to the drivers, with understanding and ability to of their machine and one’s self to stay in control at all times. There lies the discipline! No kind of ABS, or Slipper Clutch, or what ever can ever replace that.

    All companies make great machines, each one with its own character, and no two machines are the same. Even R3 model build 55 is different in its own funny way from build 54, same goes for Ninja… etc.

    Know your machine, know your environment, and especially know yourself!

    Ride safe and ride smart!

  • terrence

    IS a slipper clutch available for the r3? From where?

    • TroySiahaan

      Stock? No. Don’t know about aftermarket.