2017 Suzuki SV650

Editor Score: 83.0%
Engine 18.5/20
Suspension/Handling 11.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 8.0/10
Brakes 7.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.0/10
Appearance/Quality 8.0/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 9.5/10
Overall Score83/100

Here at MO, we’ve made it perfectly clear Suzuki missed the boat with the Gladius, the awkwardly styled and poorly-named successor to the hugely popular SV650. A name change to SFV650 wasn’t enough to fool us, either. By virtue of its stellar engine, the SFV held its own in the various comparison tests we placed it in, but it fell a little short of being a true SV successor. Then factor in the exorbitant price tag the Gladius/SFV carried – up to $8,149 in 2014 – and Suzuki had a tall order trying to win back fans of the SV650.

2014 Middleweight Mash-Up Six-Way Shootout!

Turns out Suzuki heard our mockery and had enough. With the 2017 Suzuki SV650, coming to a dealership near you in June, Suzuki decided to return to the SV’s roots with this latest model, delivering a simple, honest and affordable motorcycle that’s both rewarding and fun to ride. The best part? It’ll only set you back $6,999 (or $7,499 with ABS), a mere $9 more than Yamaha’s appealing FZ-07.

It’s All In The Engine

The best part about the SV has always been its engine, and the 645cc V-Twin remains the star here. Suzuki says more than 140 components on the SV are new or heavily revised compared to the SFV, and more than 60 of those changes are said to be in the dual-spark engine alone. The result, say the folks in Suzuki shirts, is four more horses than the SFV (75.1 hp vs. 71.1 hp) strictly through improved mechanical efficiency.

Numerous little changes to the SV’s 645cc V-Twin have made a fun engine even, uh, funner.

Numerous little changes to the SV’s 645cc V-Twin have made a fun engine even, uh, funner.

Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis was used in the design of the new pistons for optimum rigidity and weight, while each skirt is resin-coated for less friction. Cylinders are SCEM (Suzuki Composite Electrochemical Material)-plated, also for reduced friction. Compression actually drops to 11.2:1 from 11.5:1 to enable the use of regular unleaded fuel, though the bike still makes more power than before. A redesigned airbox is now larger and features staggered-length intake funnels to help with mid-range torque. The two-into-one exhaust system is also new, with the lower chamber found on the Glad/SFV now gone. In the end, the changes to the new SV result in more peak power than before while also meeting new Euro 4 regulations that begin in 2017.

Suzuki SV650 Retrospective

The rest of the package is similar SV fare: 10-hole injectors feed fuel through 39mm throttle bodies with SDTV. No, not Standard Definition Television, but Suzuki Dual Throttle Valves. The primary butterflies open and close via the rider twisting the grip, while the secondary butterflies are controlled via servo motor. Two NGK spark plugs per cylinder then combust the air/fuel mixture.

Putting the SV on a diet and slimming it down, both visually and physically, were just some of Suzuki’s design goals. The new SV fuel tank is narrower than the SFV’s tank, and the narrow seat/tank junction makes the 30.9-inch seat height seem narrower than it is. All told, the 2017 SV650 is 15 lbs lighter than the Gladius/SFV.

Putting the SV on a diet and slimming it down, both visually and physically, were just some of Suzuki’s design goals. The new SV fuel tank is narrower than the SFV’s tank, and the narrow seat/tank junction makes the 30.9-inch seat height seem narrower than it is. All told, the 2017 SV650 is 15 lbs lighter than the Gladius/SFV.

Hello, Old Friend…

Taking advantage of Suzuki’s one-push easy start button first seen on the GSX-S1000 (no more pulling the clutch to start the bike!), the SV roars to life and settles into its 1300-rpm idle easily. A new feature on the SV, the Low-RPM Assist function utilizes Suzuki’s patented idle speed control integrated within the throttle body to slightly raise revs when the clutch is engaged – the point when revs tend to drop and the bike stalls. This is meant to help new riders overcome the anxiety of learning how to operate a manual transmission, and to help everyday riders in traffic by not needing to do the clutch-throttle dance. Now riders can simply pull and (slowly) release the clutch to get going. No throttle required. What it’s not, however, is anti-stall or hill-start assist technology. You can still stall the SV with a quick clutch release, as I did upon leaving the hotel.

Part of what made the SV so endearing was its available torque being so low in the rev range. Suzuki personnel quickly glossed over the fact peak torque is achieved higher up in the revs than before, but they didn’t need to worry: the SV’s 645cc V-Twin is as glorious as ever. Actually, I’d call it better than ever. Torque is abundant on the SV, and twisting the grip results in instant thrust. Fueling is crisp and clean and the available power makes the V-Twin a very flexible engine. You can be lazy with your shifts tooling around town, knowing there’s enough oomph to carry you along. Even cruising down the highway in sixth, passing power is immediate and there’s no need to downshift to get around that annoying Prius.

The SV, and its meager suspension, rewards a smooth rider rather than the aggressive one. Despite the lack of damping adjustments, the suspenders at both ends work remarkably well given their budget origins.

The SV, and its meager suspension, rewards a smooth rider rather than the aggressive one. Despite the lack of damping adjustments, the suspenders at both ends work remarkably well given their budget origins.

But the V-Twin really comes alive once you hit the hills. Low- and mid-range grunt is impressive for a 645cc Twin, but uncharacteristically for the SV lineage, the new bike roars to life between 5,000 – 9,000 rpm, tapering off before its 10,000 rpm redline. There’s really no need to short shift the new SV like you would before – doing so would rob you of experiencing a top-end surge that’s loads of fun. As a side benefit, the intake growl and exhaust howl once you get the SV on the boil is doubly pleasing to the ears.

What About the Rest?

Of course, as the engine has always been the star of the SV show, historically the SV’s meager suspension and brakes have let it down. On paper it might seem as though that trend has continued. A 41mm fork comes with no adjustments, and the link-type shock can only be tuned for one of seven preload settings. Brakes are twin 290mm discs with two-pot calipers.

The gauge cluster is all digital on the 2017 SV and contains a bar-graph tach, fuel gauge, and gear-position indicator. The SV also features an SDS II diagnostic system, the most advanced self-contained diagnostic unit on a Suzuki to date (expect it to trickle down to other Suzukis). Among its many features, a technician can plug in to the SDS II, start the bike, and data from various sensors can be displayed and graphed in realtime to help diagnose any problems.

The gauge cluster is all digital on the 2017 SV and contains a bar-graph tach, fuel gauge, and gear-position indicator. The SV also features an SDS II diagnostic system, the most advanced self-contained diagnostic unit on a Suzuki to date (expect it to trickle down to other Suzukis). Among its many features, a technician can plug in to the SDS II, start the bike, and data from various sensors can be displayed and graphed in realtime to help diagnose any problems.

Neither are stellar, but the suspension pieces are well calibrated from the factory to provide a comfortable yet controlled ride. Paired with the steel-trellis frame carried over from the SFV650, the SV can navigate a twisty road and destroy peg feelers all day, so long as the rider is smooth with their inputs; the SV has never been a bike that likes being manhandled, and this one is no different. As for stopping power, the Tokico calipers are at best decent to adequate. A change to more aggressive pads will likely go a long way to improving performance, as bite is lacking from the stock set. Knowing SV owners, it won’t be long before someone swaps an entire GSX-R front end onto one instead. All the bikes used for the press intro were non-ABS models, so judging ABS performance will have to wait for another time.

Beyond chassis performance, another of Suzuki’s design goals for the new SV was to make it slimmer. The fuel tank is skinnier than before, without losing any of its capacity, and the 30.9-inch seat height is already pretty low. Combine that with the narrower seat/tank junction compared to the SFV/Gladius, and touching the ground isn’t a problem. A 5-foot, 2-inch journalist on our ride was easily able to get the balls of her feet on the ground.

What you’re looking at here is a contender for Best Value of 2016.

What you’re looking at here is a contender for Best Value of 2016.

Best Value Motorcycle of 2015

The SV has always been about affordable, attractive, reliable fun on two wheels for both new and experienced riders alike. It was for those reasons the SV650 was the Suzuki I really wanted – not the GSX-R – when motorcycles first entered my radar in the early 2000s. Some might say Suzuki lost its way with the SV over the years, missing the target on one or more of those attributes, but with this latest edition, I’m happy to say the magic is back.

2017 Suzuki SV650
+ Highs

  • Great price
  • Great engine
  • Great fun!
– Sighs

  • Brakes could use more power
  • Bars are a tad narrow
  • More seat padding for longer rides would be nice
2017 Suzuki SV650 Specifications
MSRP $6,999 – $7,499 (ABS)
Engine Type 645cc Liquid-cooled, EFI, DOHC, four-stroke, 90-degree V-Twin, 4 valves per cylinder
Bore and Stroke 81.0mm x 62.6mm
Compression Ratio 11.2:1
Crankshaft Horsepower (claimed) 75.1 hp @ 8,500 rpm
Torque (claimed) 47.2 lb-ft @ 8100 rpm
Transmission 6-speed; multi-plate wet clutch
Final Drive Chain
Front Suspension 41mm conventional fork.
Rear Suspension Link-type single shock, preload adjustable.
Front Brake Dual 290mm floating discs, two-piston calipers. ABS
Rear Brake Single 240 disc, Single-piston caliper
Front Tire 120/70-17
Rear Tire 160/60-17
Rake/Trail 25.0º/4.1 in
Wheelbase 56.9 in
Seat Height 30.9 in
Curb Weight (Claimed) 429.9 lbs (434.3 lbs ABS)
Fuel Capacity 3.8 gal (3.6 gal CA)

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Suzuki Communities

  • Born to Ride

    Good to know that she isn’t soggy off the bottom with those new cams. If I had cash to buy a toy I’d love to grab one of these and do the necessary adjustments for it to have the suspension and brakes I want.

  • JMDonald

    Good for Suzuki. I know they had a price point to hit but I would have liked to see a version with better brakes and suspension. I read too much.

    • Born to Ride

      Sadly the SV is one of those bikes that the suspension and brakes ACTUALLY do bring it down. Thankfully, if you’re willing to spend a bit of cash you can have it fixed and experience a wonderful little roadster. I just wish they would put some cheap inverted forks on it like they do with the GSX750. Then they would be just a cartridge swap away from perfection rather than having to deal with the headache of sourcing all the bits and pieces from wrecked bikes.

      • Jaime Berrones

        Its a shame, i really like this bike i want a daily conmmuter and a ocasional track day bike, but i will need upgrade brakes and suspension because im somewhat heavy.
        the front suspension its not a big deal since parts and labor are relatively well priced because its rebuildable
        the brakes too change the pads and steelbraided lines, maybe a radial master cilinder and thats it
        but the rear shock its not cheap and you need to replace the original with an aftermarket one because its not rebuildable.
        i dont know if changing only the shock spring is enough to have a improvement,
        A good pipe could be a nice touch since i dont like the original one
        The problem its the cost of the upgrade, if it is too much perhaps its better looking for other ride wich need less investment.
        its the problem with budget bikes, they have to fulfill a lot of needs for very different people,

        • c w

          Several SFV owners over an svrider appear to have had success replacing the shock with late-model Gixxer 600/750 take-offs.

          50 bucks. (or whatever they go for on eBay these days)

          • Born to Ride

            I bought a late model 750 shock for mine for 50$ on fleabay. Had to buy new dogbones too. Additional 30$.

          • Jaime Berrones

            you got a point dude

          • TroySiahaan

            Yup, I bought a Kawi ZX-R shock for mine (can’t remember if it was the 10 or 6), then someone on the Ninja 250 forum bought my stock SV shock for the same price I paid for the ZX shock. Win! Then I went ahead and bought an Ohlins because the deal was too good to pass up.

      • TroySiahaan

        There are folks out there who can make the standard SV fork work surprisingly well. Even the damper rod first gen forks. I wouldn’t know, since I went nuts and slapped on a GSX-R front end on mine. Ha!

        • Born to Ride

          I bought aftermarket cartridges for mine, and swapped the calipers for 4-pot Nissins with the SV racing brackets. Cost me about 800$ for everything and installed it myself. HUGE improvement over the stock stuff. But then I rode my friends after he did the GSXR swap and resprung it. Brakes and fork action was better than mine. I was very sad.

          • TroySiahaan

            I’m ashamed how much I paid for my GSX-R front end, right when the first batch of radial-mount calipers came on the scene.

          • Born to Ride

            My friend bought the Showa BPF with brembos for a pretty penny the year that they came out on the gixxer. I commonly joked that he got them so fast that he must have bought the forks off of the very first K12 Gixxer to be wrecked. Of course those words were seething with jealousy.

    • Kenneth

      It seems to me that no matter what a manufacturer builds, some people will wish they had done it differently, so maybe starting at a low price, which allows those who wish for something to be changed to do so – or not – is a smart choice (for this segment of the market).

  • Kenneth

    Re: The photos – I would find the photos more useful if 4 of the 5 riding shots were not of the bike leaned over. MO’s recent review of Honda’s CB500F, if I remember correctly, was a great example of showing how a bike will look with a rider, on the street. In fact, after showing side- and front-shots of a rider on the bike, I’d prefer all other photos to be of the bike, itself. At least cover the basics first, before showcasing the rider (am I the only one who feels this way?).
    Oh, and Good Job, Suzuki for once-again making a desirable SV!

  • John B.

    I re-read the 2014 shootout for this category. With the SV650 and KTM 690 Duke getting significantly better for 2016, it would be interesting to have another shootout. The Duke likely tops the category, but at a higher price. With the Yamaha FZ-07, Duke 390, and SV650, there are plenty of attractive options in this category. It’s time for the Ninja 650 to get a stem to stern upgrade.

  • Craig Hoffman

    Awesome the price actually went down, and the resulting bike is better than it’s predecessor. That is a double win.

    Every SV I have ridden has been super fun. They are such compact bikes, and they beg to be flogged and sound great when flogging. Biggest problem I have encountered on my borrowed SV rides is not riding it like an idiot and doing wheelies all over the place. Something about the SV whispers to me, “Ya man, lets do this!” This is a great quality is a motorcycle :)

  • SXV 550

    Glad its back (and not another Gladius). My only motorcycling regret is not starting on one of these and keeping it for years instead of flipping so many others losing money in the process

    • Moto Ray

      Couldn’t have said it better myself…and I still haven’t owned an SV. Shame on me.

    • c w

      What did you start on?

  • hamza naeem

    svsvsvsv

    • http://www.abornewords.com/blog-pleasure.php Nicole Kim Phillips

      Thanks for recommending this post

  • Vrooom

    They were always super fun bikes, if poorly sprung. Great commuters and not a bad backroad scratcher. While you could tour on anything, these weren’t ideal for that due to the suspension. We the readers pine for, nay demand, a shootout with the FZ07 and a few others of the same ilk.

  • DickRuble

    Other than aesthetic reasons, what were the main gripes about the gladius? Buy a barely used one for $3500, upgrade suspension and brakes for $2500 and you have a toy that’s going to laugh at the current one.

    • c w

      The seat. Exhaust system girth and heft. Brakes. Suspension.

      • DickRuble

        Looks like none of these were addressed by the current iteration.

        • c w

          The exhaust has been changed to a lighter and smaller system and, by Troy’s impression, so has the suspension (better dampened).

          The seat is a completely new sculpt and has been quite comfortable on my opportunities to sit on the bike.

    • Ser Samsquamsh

      The name “Gladius”- that most efficient meat cleaver that killed a million Goths 2000 years ago but Troy thinks sounds like someone handing you a piece of peach cobbler. Actually – I like cobbler too…..

    • TroySiahaan

      Other than aesthetics? Well, at one point (2014) Suzuki wanted $8,149 for one. This when the FZ-07 was going for $6,990.

  • Michael Mccormick

    Too little too late. How come Yamaha takes aim at the current market players and produces the R3, FZ07,FZ09, R1 that are huge improvements while Suzuki brings out warmed over models

    • Kenneth

      Yes, Yamaha is more progressive than Suzuki. So what? This model built a huge following, and many were not hoping for something more “progressive” – they wanted a return of the SV650, as we knew it, and Suzuki delivered it.

      • Michael Mccormick

        So buy one

    • Martin Buck

      I have been in the Suzuki/Yamaha debate since the 1970s, and one consistent theme seems to come through. The Yamahas may be up to date style wise, and have the edge on power, but Suzukis just seem to handle better, and that makes all the difference. With my T250 Suzuki, I was always able to hang with my buddies riding their RD350s. When I “graduated” to an RD350 of my own, I hated it. It didn’t feel like an extension of my own body the way the Suzuki did. I imagine the same scenario between the FZ-07 and the SV650. And I have always made changes with suspension, and never begrudged the cost, especially if made a while after purchase.

      • Michael Mccormick

        Yeah and I owned a T350 Rebel in 1973. Glad I owned one but glad I own a R3 today. So what is your point?

      • Michael Mccormick

        I don’t see how one could go wrong buying the new SV or the FZ. To me the Suzuki is better looking. Not crazy about Yamahas transformerI/insect styling they use on their need models I like the Vtwin engine, just wish the displacement was closer to 700 which would also improve the V Strom

  • Bmwclay

    What’s wrong with my Prius?

  • http://www.motou.info Gabe Ets-Hokin

    Nice story, Troy! How did they get the weight down so much still using the same frame as the Lady-us?

    I’m impressed at how affordable this bike is–adjusting for inflation, this bike is $4873 in 1999 dollars. The first SV’s MSRP was $5799. So much for good motorcycles being too expensive!

    • c w

      “Lady-us”

      Rare is the dead horse that has ever been so beaten…

      The frame wasn’t the big weight offender on the SFV. Note the one-piece steel rider/passenger peg holders have been replaced with smaller ones and the passenger pegs migrated to separate removable hangers.

      The big culprit – the massive Euro 3 spec exhaust system has been replaced with a cat and can the are both much smaller/lighter.

      • http://www.motou.info Gabe Ets-Hokin

        I have yet to meet a dead horse that protested about being kicked.

        But you made good points about the weight savings.

        • c w

          The horse isn’t the one having to deal with the splattered, rotting flesh.

          😉

    • Ser Samsquamsh

      You guys have a problem with the Lady-us-es? SV was my first new bike and I was sad to have to sell it…

    • TroySiahaan

      I’m pretty sure the weight loss is attributed to a healthy sprinkling of unicorn tears and a blending of Jenny Craig microwave dinners in the fuel. E-85 or whatever…

  • SRMark

    Hell, my body is poorly sprung. Might just the new SV and ride around with my son. He has an SVF that I find perfectly acceptable for riding the vast majority of our deer and bear infested back roads. But then again that Scrambler Duc ain’t too expensive either.

  • Ben Dover

    Had a 2006 SV650N a couple years ago, really sweet bullet proof motor and a great little bike. I was a bit cramped on the bike (just under 6′), but if it fits you it’s a great option…

  • Rand

    Few questions: Where is the new SV650 made? Is there an S model coming out? What are the valve adjustment intervals?

    I like where Yamaha is going lately. Except for the lack of ABS. Looking forward to a FZ07 vs SV650 vs …?

    • Born to Ride

      I rode my SV to 20k, had the valves checked, they were in spec. So I rode it another 20k and sold it.

    • TroySiahaan

      New SV is made in Japan. Suzuki wouldn’t confirm an S model in the future, but it wasn’t denied, either…

      • Rand

        Thanks Troy! Love your reviews, keep it going!

        And encouraging you to be real with us, I acknowledge you have history with the SV, hope you guys do a long term review with it.

        Ideas:
        Maybe do a few mods and see where it goes!
        Also would like to see a dyno run with the new motor.
        Compare a 2nd gen to the 4th gen (maybe add 1st and 3rd gen)

  • halfkidding

    I don’t suppose there was any way for Suzuki to punch the displacement up to around 750cc’s. I know it’s crazy but I think there would be a sweet spot in the market for a 3/4 liter family of bikes.

    • TroySiahaan

      Look up: Suzuki GSX-S750. It’s basically a GSX-R750 with upright bars. People have bored the SV to 750cc, but then you’re dealing with a ticking time bomb in regards to reliability.

  • Chris

    Three things: 1) Good for Suzuki, stay in the game/segment; 2) How will this thing be for larger riders, cockpit room and suspension? I’m 6’1″, 195# and the FZ-07 (and -09) just felt small (among other dislikes); and 3) The Duke is the way to go for just a hooligan, around town, fun bike, I’m thinking. The quality components and ligher weight are worth it. If you need an all-round bike, the multi-cylinders make more sense. I have other bikes, so I’m still thinking Duke (Now the Husky 701 is just too much for me.). Much obliged for the article.

    • c w

      It depends on how your 73 inches are distributed and how much lubricity remains in your knees. I’m 5′ 8.25″ barefoot with a 30 inch inseam. It sits nice, but feels close enough to my GS500 that I’d probably spring for a sheepskin at least.

      Hopefully, Suzuki gets the optional taller saddle out soon. 6 foot is around where people will start wanting to take a look a that.

      • Chris

        Yep, there are a lot of variables in this riding game. That’s why there are so many different bikes. Folks like different stuff.

        If you go w/a taller saddle, it messes w/the ergonomics package: reach to the bars, wind protection, etc. Sometimes it works out great, sometimes it causes other problems. I have had enough bikes, and spent enough money on ’em, that a bike needs to be really close to “right” from the factory. I’ll do some basic performance mods, but that’s about it. They’re too expensive not to be pretty close to right, anyway (W/in reason of price-pint, etc.).

        To each his own. Ride and enjoy: whatever helps you do that.

  • kenneth_moore

    Troy, if you were in the dealership spending your money, and the choice was this or the FZ-07, which would you buy? I’ve seen both (rode the FZ but not the new 650), and I know which I’d buy. From my layman’s perspective the FZ is a significantly better bike in every way.

    • TroySiahaan

      I’d like to save my response to this question until I’m able to ride both bikes side-by-side. It’s been a while since I’ve ridden the FZ-07, so it’d be unfair to give an answer considering the new SV is fresh in my mind and I have a history with them. That said, after riding the Yamaha I seriously considered actually buying one for myself. Then again, I’m seriously considering buying the SV, too.

      • kenneth_moore

        This looks like a great pairing for an MO Comparo. One edge the SV should have over the FZ is a huge aftermarket selection. They’ve been making upgrade parts for SVs for a very long time.

      • Craig Hoffman

        The great thing about the SV is el cheapo suspension mods for it have been well figured out. No doubt the FZ07 can be modded too, but we have not had time to figure out what triple clamps, inverted forks and shocks from other bikes can bolt onto it. Dudes with milling machines milling brackets and steering stems, etc to make it all happen. We will figure it out though, we always do.

        I have an old FZ1 (another bike that has been around for awhile), and we know all about how to suspension mod that bike on the cheap 😉

  • sgray44444

    Great little bike, even if it is still a little behind the times. I prefer the looks over the Yamaha by a large margin. The motor is one of the all-time greats. I still think Suzuki is missing the mark by not offering a performance version with better suspension and brakes. A sport-touring version would be nice as well. And, for that matter, why hasn’t Suzuki released a Hayabusa-based sport tourer? It worked for Kawasaki.

    • TroySiahaan

      The SV is meant to be a starting point for all kinds of riding, whether it’s racing or touring, or even flat track (yep, they exist).

      You do have a good point about the ‘Busa-based sport-tourer…

    • c w

      Because the Busa is already a sport-tourer?

      I’d wager it would have been done were Suzuki in the black. The S needs to spend some time paring down/focusing before being ever to produce every bike it should.

      • sgray44444

        If they would take a Busa and lower the pegs slightly, put on riser style clip-ons, a large touring shield, and hard bags, I bet they could tap into a whole new market for minimal investment. Like you said, it’s pretty much known to be a sport-tourer anyway.

        • c w

          Yeah…and the same thing could be achieved via the accessories counter if somebody at the Big Office would hire a good salesperson to work really good deal with aftermarket suppliers.

          It also feels like that’s something that should have happened 10 years ago, though. The ‘Busa is probably at the point where it simply needs a replacement (which may already be in the offing). It may also be time to just let it rest for a while…sell out the remaining stock as specials (perhaps with those bags you were talking about) and let the new GSX-R carry the performance flag for a while.

          • sgray44444

            I agree; it should have been done years ago. I’m not sure about needing a replacement, but possibly a little freshening up would be good. The GSX-R is a great bike, but I’m not sure it’s really hitting the same sweet spot as the Busa. The Busa is a torque monster, with effortless acceleration. I think that is why so many older guys ride them… kind of like the ‘gentleman’s express’. The frame size and length also works to advantage when setting them up for touring. It also doesn’t hurt that they are stable and aerodynamic at speed. I guess what I’m envisioning would be a supersport touring bike with a little less weight and a little more of a sportbike attitude. The current sport tourers have all become a little too standard in their riding position, and definitely too heavy. I really could care less about a shaft drive. I’d gladly give it up for less weight. But I do want that turbine-smooth monster motor!

          • c w

            Well, the ‘Busa has been freshened…but 16 years old is 16 years old. In order to get the part of the ‘Busa market that’s isn’t older guys to buy one, might require something new (because, “hey, look, it’s new!!!”).

            I’m not saying they are the same thing, just they that they fulfill a similar function as halo bikes. The ’17 GSX-R gives Suz a flagship for a while until they figure out where to go with big bore four. Maybe it will even be the basis for it.

          • sgray44444

            one other important thing: if they could find a way to classify it as a touring bike (but not neuter it), many more people would buy one because the insurance wouldn’t be quite as ridiculous.

          • Born to Ride

            Insurance is ridiculous on sports tourers too. I pay the highest premium on my Sprint, which is by far my least valuable motorcycle. They classify it as a 1045cc superbike.

          • sgray44444

            Crazy… who knew? I didn’t think the insurance on my Speed Triple was all that bad, but on a Busa it would have probably doubled.

          • Born to Ride

            Your speedie is a “standard”. I pay half the premium on my “standard” Ducati monsters with full coverage than I do on my Sprint with Comp and liability only. Busa was the most expensive bike to insure for a while. IDK what is the current premium king. But just for reference, if I were to add an aprilia RSV4 to my policy, BOOM 1800$ increase. If I add a “standard” V4r Tuono of the same year, with the same chassis, electronics, and engine(minus 5 HP), to my premium, 220$ increase. Both full coverage. It is effing stupid and the primary reason I will likely never own an outright sport bike unless it is safety wired and sporting a fiberglass fairing.

          • sgray44444

            I might need to shop around a little then, because I think State Farm has it listed as a sportbike. I might be paying way too much.

  • Sabelotodo

    How about an all SV/SFV shoot-out – one representative from each generation?

  • http://www.abornewords.com/blog-pleasure.php Nicole Kim Phillips

    Wow, this new bike takes me way back to the days when my Brother bought his first Suzuki Motorcycle before he even knew how to ride it. He learned quick though.

  • Max Wellian

    I liked the styling of the Gladius. It looked like a carbon copy of a much more expensive MV Agusta Brutale. I’m sure all the magazines that wrote about the MV loved that styling…
    Anyway, this one is more Japanese looking. It’s mostly acceptable if bland. I’m afraid the giant radiator cap sticking out next to the tank takes tacky to the next level however.

    • c w

      Oh. So there’s one other person in the “I wish they’d stuck with radiator covers camp” besides me.

      Welcome.

      That bugs me and all the coolant lines going back and forth from the oil cooler bug me. I have to admit, though – I forgot all about that when I rode it. Fine, fine motorsickle.

  • c w

    Dear Mo,

    The neophytes have beaten you.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfPjSf5wDo0

    Your comparo must now be even more impressive than expected.

    Explosions are compulsory.