2018 Indian Scout Bobber

Editor Score: 81.0%
Engine 19.0/20
Suspension/Handling 10.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 7.0/10
Instruments/Controls3.5/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 6.5/10
Appearance/Quality 9.0/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 8.0/10
Overall Score81/100

After seeing the new 2018 Indian Scout Bobber on Friday, I called Editor Duke to brief him on the new model. After explaining that it was, mechanically, very similar to the original Scout with mostly cosmetic changes, he asked me a simple but important question: “Well, would you rather buy this one or the old one?” The answer was easy: I would definitely rather have this new Scout Bobber.

2018 Indian Scout Bobber Unveiled

Things can sometimes change after an actual road test, so I put my initial thoughts into the back of my mind and looked forward to the debut ride the following day.

Indian made a conscious decision to launch the bike concurrently with X Games due to the extreme-sport audience being a target demographic for this model. Also invited to the media launch was freestyle motocrosser Carey Hart, who spent the weekend riding with us, adding to the vibe. Stunt rider Aaron Colton unveiled the bike to the world in grand fashion by sliding the Bobber out onto the stage and shredding some rubber at the Indian Hometown Throwdown party Friday evening. Colton also joined us for the press ride on Saturday.

Indian Scout Bobber

Indian’s badassery starts at $11,499. ABS is available only on the Thunder Black Smoke version, retailing at $12,499.

Indian’s target customer for the Scout Bobber is the younger, hipper, wanna-be-edgy type that sometimes prefers style over practicality. And before you light up the comment thread below, that’s okay sometimes. Every bike doesn’t have to be practical; something more visceral can be desired.

Someone once told me, if you don’t turn around at least once to look at your bike after you park it, just to look at it, maybe it’s not the right bike. I agree with this sentiment 110%. A motorcycle should make you want to just admire it for the particular qualities that make it special to you. The great thing about this is that it is subjective. There are no wrong answers, there are no wrong bikes.

Indian Scout Bobber

The Scout Bobber receives a blacked-out headlight nacelle similar to its big brother the Chief Dark Horse.

The new Scout pulls its existence from these very ideas. It’s not a ridiculously raked-out chopper or a hard-tail bobber that will compact your spine just by running over a manhole cover. But it is, in some regard, form over function.

Shootout At The MO Corral: A Bout With The Scout + Video

I was reminded of this as soon as I sat on the bike and we began to make our way out of Minneapolis. The bar and footpeg locations force a rider to lean forward into a somewhat aggressive riding position. For me, it was just forward enough to start feeling some strain in my lower back, yet not so far forward as to require my core to hold myself up.

2015 Indian Scout First Ride Review

I enjoyed the new position of the footpegs, which is 1.5 inches back from the original Scout. The position is conducive to riding aound town, but after a bit of highway riding, I wasn’t the only one resting my heels on top of the footpegs to stretch my legs. Another caveat to the new peg location is it comes at the cost of two degrees of cornering clearance, which was evident during the peg scrapes while flipping back and forth through roundabouts.

Indian Scout Bobber

Taller riders may want to swap the mirrors into the optional position above the bars for additional clearance for knees. I had to be aware of them during tight parking-lot maneuvers and I’m 5-foot-8

Chopped fenders front and rear are key to the minimalist bobber styling. This may lead you to think that the massive front tire is bigger and fatter on the Scout Bobber when reality, it is the exact 130/90-16 from the original. The shorter fenders cost practical points; another rider I was following crossed through some water in a gutter, sending the street aqua straight up into the air reminiscent of a Jet Ski. To be fair, I think Indian chopped the rear fender at a reasonable cut so you won’t end up with your back covered in dirt and water should you get stuck in a downpour riding to your next stop.

Indian Scout Bobber

Some of the guys on the ride whined about the seat at our next stop after about 50 miles, but I didn’t have any issues. I wanted to stretch my back and enjoy my coffee, but I was still looking forward to jumping back on the bike for more time in its two-toned saddle. An extra inch or two of leg length from my 30-inch inseam would’ve better locked me into the seat. I did have times where I felt myself sliding back after having choked up in the seat for one reason or another. The seat height, at 25.6 inches, will put most riders flat-footed, which will help newbie feel more comfortable with the 554-pound curb weight. The Bobber’s thicker saddle raises ride height ever so slightly. Weight is down by five pounds from small changes, most obviously from the shorter fenders.

Indian Scout Bobber

Now let’s talk about the suspension. If people have an issue with the idea of the Scout Bobber after reading its spec chart, it has been mainly the loss of an inch of rear suspension travel. To best put it to the test, I aimed for each and every bump in the road and train track I could find to give you my rear end’s feedback.

First off, let’s be clear about the Bobber’s intention; this isn’t a touring or adventure bike, so it doesn’t need cushy, electronic, dynamically damped suspension. On the roads around Minneapolis with my geared-up weight of about 165 pounds. I was pleasantly surprised by the suspension’s performance. It was only over sharp bumps, like train tracks at speed, when objectionable harshness was felt. For the majority of riding, in the city or out on the highway, the 2 inches of travel in the rear was sufficient. The new cartridge-style fork up front also did a great job of keeping things compliant in the twistier stuff, and front-end dive while braking was nearly non-existent.

Toward the end of the day most of the guys were ready to call it and head for beers at Minneapolis’ Indeed brewery, which was where our ride would finish. A few of us decided we wanted to go out and grab a few more photos before handing back our keys.

Indian Scout Bobber

At this point we were back in town and I was feeling comfortable on the bike. As we blasted through some gravel in a construction zone, the overwhelming urge to break traction consumed me. After a quick glance behind me to make sure I wasn’t about to pelt another new Indian motorcycle with rocks, I spun up the engine, dropped the clutch and kicked the bike sideways in my best Brad Baker impression. ABS (which is only available on the Thunder Black Smoke colorway) is easily disabled for extra fun. The bike had done its job. I felt like a badass.

As our time grew to an end on the Scout Bobber, the last few of us seemed to want to test out its hooligan abilities. This ended up seeing another journalist jump the bike over a loading ramp. I’ll be honest, I think he may have been wishing for a few more inches of suspension travel due to the impact bringing his voice up an octave or two.

Indian Scout Bobber

While the Indian Scout Bobber might not be the FTR750-inspired street tracker many had hoped for, it is a blast to ride, begging you to ride it hard and put it away wet. The Bobber does exactly what Indian planned for it to do. It looks badass, it makes you feel badass and it makes you want to do badass shit.

Indian Scout Bobber

2018 Indian Scout Bobber
+ Highs

  • Makes you feel like a badass
  • 20 horses more motor than a Sportster
  • Cruise American without me-too status
– Sighs

  • Short-hop riding position
  • Bar-and-Shield envy
  • ABS unavailable on four colorways
Indian Scout Bobber

The Scout Bobber gets its own set of accessories available from Indian. Shown here we have the 1920s springer-style seat, mini ape-hangers, slip-on exhaust, and spoked wheels.

Indian Scout Bobber

A passenger seat that matches the original’s two-toned color is available if you plan to share the ride.

indian scout bobber

A small tail bag and single side saddlebag are some of the luggage options available from Indian. Only big enough for the smallest of Macs or a bomber of your favorite craft beer.

  • Jon Jones

    So punch-in-the-face!!!!!

  • Born to Ride

    Perfectly sufficient but objectionally harsh over sharp bumps around town(not even on the highway), is absolutely not a positive review of the rear suspension. There are plenty of bikes that are beautiful and have functional shock absorbers. This bike appears to be a peg relocation kit, a handlebar, and a set of 2-3″ longer progressives out back away from greatness.

    • Gruf Rude

      The foot forward, no rear suspension cruiser is just un-rideable for me. I was forced onto this style for a complete day twice in my career while going through the MSF Instructor course and it hurt my (admittedly bad) back so much I declined to take the position (heh, heh) as instructor. Cruisers apparently work well for many, but not for me.

      • Born to Ride

        The riding position is better with floorboards and a bigger saddle, and the position is far more comfortable when there is a nice cushy set of shocks under you. I can ride my dads T-Bird all day no problem. I like to hook my heels over the edge of the floorboards on my Guzzi. Admittedly, I am far more comfortable for the long haul on my multistrada though, that bike has the most neutral and natural ergos of anything I’ve ridden to date.

    • DickRuble

      You’re kidding. This bike is a full, frame, suspension redesign away from being decent. A 1985 Sabre V65 looks better, handles better, is more comfortable. weighs less and will easily outrun this POS. Oh.. and it will still be around another 30 years from now, when nobody will remember this Scout.

  • Old MOron

    This is not my type of bike, but I wanted to check out the FNG’s first review. Good effort, Ryan. Welcome aboard.

    • Ryan

      I appreciate you giving me the time of day!

      • Born to Ride

        You did a good job and added some genuine flair that didn’t seem contrived or trying too hard
        *cough* Ty… *cough*
        Keep it real and you’ll be a welcome addition to the MOrons.

      • Old MOron

        Of course as the FNG you have to take your rash of shit 🙂
        According to Weather Underground, the high in Minneapolis was 93 °F last Friday. Why are you covering your face as though it were cold? Are you too baby-faced to put on a proper outlaw scowl? Were you trying to boost your intimidation factor? Or maybe Indian invited a bunch of hip vloggers, and you wanted to fit in?

        • Ryan

          Haha, yes! Now I feel welcomed here! I grew up in the middle of Illinois and I know how the bugs can be on humid days in the Midwest. Generally, I wear full-face helmets most of the time. Not going to lie though, there was part of me that thought it would go with the tough-guy, outlaw look! And plus, with my Irish heritage, I burn easily.

          • Old MOron

            I’m sure you’ve had a look at this comment section. Some folks are concerned with the function of the ABS. Perhaps in future reviews you can comment on how intrusive or transparent the system is. MOrons care about this stuff.

          • Ryan

            Noted, Old MOron. My response to another comment regarding ABS- “ABS on the Scout Bobber wasn’t intrusive. You could really get a good squeeze and good stopping power before it kicked in. You can feel the pulsing in the levers however, it wasn’t anything that would cause me to ding the system as not performing well.”

  • Joe

    I look forward to the day when manufacturers don’t limit ABS availability to just one color option. It’s almost embarrassing that bikes in the U.S. don’t come with ABS as standard.

    • Dana Pellerin

      It really is sad. I just bought a Triumph Scrambler with ABS, traction control and throttle by wire for under $11k.

    • Born to Ride

      I’m torn on mandatory ABS. I have liked/never noticed the ABS on high performance models I’ve sampled(CBR1000 c-abs, various Ducatis, MV Agusta, and Street triple) and perhaps this is a product of their adjustable intervention threshold which I always set to the minimum. However I have found the budgetary single stage abs modules on low performance bikes like my Guzzi, my dads T-Bird, and the BMW R9T scrambler to be insufferably intrusive. I think that bad ABS absolutely impedes the riders ability to stop quickly in good conditions and is better off omitted. However I cannot deny the value of the safety net for inexperienced riders or in low traction conditions like the wet or dirty roads. If ABS is mandatory, I think that it should also be mandatory that it be switchable and remember the riders preference, so that it can be turned on when the need arises but otherwise disabled.

      • Joe

        I think of it as just another tool to have, that hopefully you’ll never need. I fully agree with your last statement, having the option to turn it off or lower intervention would be best.

      • JMDGT

        I was not a fan of ABS when it first came out. The systems all seemed to lack feel and the servo assisted pulsing on some of the ones I tried out were horrible. In my opinion. At the time it seemed to be a poor substitute for a good set of sport bike brakes. The new systems are seemless. The brakes on the Street Triple RS can be customized by adjusting the master cylinder to increase the amount of pressure to the individuals liking. I haven’t used that feature but the concept is a great idea for the track guys. I find the sport setting to be the right amount of abs intervention for me. I ride pretty conservative these days but I still like to brake a little deep into some of the corners on the good roads here. You can disable abs if you want to. Cornering abs sounds interesting. It is a standard feature on the new RTs. Ride safe.

        • Born to Ride

          Well that pretty much echos my sentiment. The really nice sport bike systems are no problem and only an improvement. It’s the ABS systems that get slapped on bikes like this that perform like garbage, then they often don’t let you disengage it. if they do, you have to do it every time you ride and deal with that stupid flashing ABS light.

          • JMDGT

            Yeah. It all defies reason. I would think making ABS standard and switchable would not add a whole lot to the cost of a bike.

      • Kenneth

        “…so that it can be turned on when the need arises, but otherwise disabled.”

        In my (painful and expensive) experience, “when the need arises” can easily be too late. In my opinion, the only time it would be beneficial to turn off a well-designed, non-intrusive ABS system is off-road, and I don’t think it’s a good idea to imply (as many do) to possibly newer street riders that ABS is something to graduate from wanting.

        • Born to Ride

          If I’m riding through the desert where I know the roads are dusty, ABS on. If I’m on the road and it starts to rain on me, ABS on. If I’m on the freeway on a warm day in May and I want to be able to stop as quickly as possible when the ass clown in his Bro-Dozer F350 decides to jump the double yellow, ABS off. That being said, ABS on a high end sport bike is perfectly fine just being set to its lowest setting and left there at all times. But on bikes like my California with single stage ABS systems that are conservative with their actuation threshold, I want to turn it off.

        • Born to Ride

          Also my condolences for the misfortune.

    • Bill Marshall

      Not all of us like to have, or use ABS on a bike. I personally don’t like ABS on any of my equipment, both bikes, and cars.
      But to each their own I guess.

    • Ryan

      ABS on the Scout Bobber wasn’t intrusive. You could really get a good squeeze and good stopping power before it kicked in. You can feel the pulsing in the levers however, it wasn’t anything that would cause me to ding the system as not performing well.

  • Douglas

    Seems like something you’d get tired of fairly quickly…..the millenials aren’t going for bikes like their ancestors. The youngest boomers are now in their late 50’s to 70 and have their rides, mostly G Wings, EGlides, etc. The GenX’ers are just reaching their early 50’s and may still go for eggbikes or cruisers. But sales of all genre (with the possible exception of scooters, since many downtown areas have regenerated and are now the hip places to live and cars and big bikes are not needed) are predicted to be flat or down for at least the next 5 years. Hafta wonder if the H-D type can hold their own….

    • Born to Ride

      Lots of young guys and gals riding where I live, but that’s more an effect of culture, climate, and topography than it is a representation of market trends. Just saying that when the conditions are ideal for riding, young people do indeed ride. The issue is more that “Millennials” tend to lack either the credit or the cash(or both) to buy brand new bikes and end up purchasing lightly used bikes at massive discounts.

  • Jason

    You wanted to stop and stretch after only 50 miles. That says it all.

    However, in a more serious note: What was gained by installing shocks with 2 inches of travel? The frame looks the same as the Scout and it looks like the rear fender is just cut back. Why not use same shocks as the Scout?

    • Ryan

      “One of the things we wanted to do was keep it slammed and low to the ground” -Indian’s Project Manager. Frame is the same, shock mounting points are the same.

      • lennon2017

        Poorish rear travel is not the end of the world, and pretty quickly remedied. If Harley owners are known to toss stock shocks and seats for more compliant and maybe more visually appealing fare too, Indian Scout…scouts might just be inclined to do the same. I know, “But why couldn’t they at least try that measly bit harder on a potentially 12,5k ride.” It’s cruisers. I’m encouraged by the fork technicals, which would be a bigger pain in the ass to alter. And then I come up against those unfathomably mismatched pipes. Dilemmas!

  • JMDGT

    One more on the “sigh” side…….. it’s not the FTR750.

    • Kevin Duke

      Ha! I actually thought of that but discarded it because Indian already has had plenty of crucifiers about that and I still firmly believe we’ll eventually see the FTR streetbike.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        “Eventually” is right.

      • Auphliam

        If by eventually you actually mean not a chance in hell, then I agree with you 🙂

    • TheMarvelous1310

      They came out with the FTR…

      • JMDGT

        Good. I think they will sell.

  • Luke

    I love the fork-to-tank-to-seat like on this bike. A great elegant bit of design that is also super muscular. Never thought I’d be an ape-hanger guy, but this bike looks right with them in the accessory image. My only visual gripe is the exhaust. Not sure what would fix that for me, but everything else on the bike has a taught aggressive feel to it and the pipes look kind of inflated and cartoony. I guess I would be sure to park is so my glance back after parking is of the other side.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      What do you think of the fake shiny 60-degree cylinders?

      • Jason

        1. How are the cylinders “fake”
        2. Why should anyone care about the angle between the cylinders?

        • Sayyed Bashir

          It doesn’t look like a form-follows-function design. There are circles and ribs but it isn’t clear whether they are there to support the overhead cams inside or are just for show. Also the function of the shelf below the circles isn’t clear. Of course there are no fins because it is not a air-cooled engine but some fins would make it look more like a engine and possibly keep it cooler.

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9a82df68a0530b3cbfd21d84577529393adff730a05930f6e14fa429f0600bd1.jpg

          The larger angle between the cylinders makes the engine longer and puts the rear cylinder right below the sensitive part of the riders anatomy.

          • Jason

            Looks are very subjective but to me the Scout engine looks like a modern engine that would look fine powering a wide variety of motorcycles. Harley engines (and the engine in the Indian Chief) look like antiques.

            A larger angle COULD make an engine longer but that can be compensated for by stacking the transmission vertically (which Indian has done). Looking at a Sportster and the Scout the rear cylinder looks to be about the same distance from the family jewels. The difference is the majority of that heat is being carried away by the water jacket in the Scout while it is radiating off the cylinder head on the Sportster. A 60 degree angle also cancels secondary vibration so that the engine only needs 1 balancing shaft instead of the two needed for a 45 degree twin.

            It is also interesting to note that the Harley Revolution X engine is also a 60 degree twin as was the V-Rod engine before it.

          • Born to Ride

            Don’t use logic, I already tried.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Logic is left brained. Bikes appeal to the right brain.

      • Luke

        I don’t mind them. If they were blacked out, a lot of the flow of the tank would be lost in a sea of flat black. There is a little chrome on all the sections of the bike – front fork/wheel, engine, and rear wheel.

        I could go either way. I can see why they did it, and those reasons seem sound to me. The other way makes sense too though. I personally don’t like 100% black (I’m one of the only non-fans of the Buick Grand National for instance).

  • Tanner

    nobody buys cruisers for their performance.

    Why not just get the real-deal? You’ll always have this nagging thing in the back of your mind that you should have gotten a harley. If you want this style bike, there is no substitute

    • Clutchman11

      Sorry, not sorry that I don’t agree with you. There are tons of “substitutes”. I know of enough people who like cruisers but aren’t blinded by the bar and shield. Just like people who buy a Cadillac, Mercedes, or what have you didn’t buy it with “this nagging thing in the back of [their] mind, that [they] should have gotten a ” Ford Model T, because there’s no “substitute”. People buy a bike that they want and or like. You like Harleys? Yay for you.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        Harley is the real deal. Others are mostly copycats.

        • Clutchman11

          Must be nice to be able to ignore the historical impact of Wagner, Indian, Dayton, Crawford, Flying Merkel, Crocker, Henderson-Excelsior, Cleveland and many others. Despite some of them being founded before H-D, they must all be copy cats as well right? Considering only H-D can be the real deal?
          Just to help you out: whereas H-D was founded in 1903, Wagner and Indian started earlier, 1901. You know how many brands were being sold before H-D? You might want to check out the following:
          Wagner, Indian, DeLong, Royal, Auto-Bi, Marsh, Holley, Orient, Mitchell, American. And then I’m probably forgetting a couple that were on the market in 1902.
          H-D wasn’t even the first with the V-Twin configuration, as Gottlieb Daimler built one in 1889, Princeps AutoCar did so in 1902, Glenn Curtiss and NSU built theirs in 1903, with H-D following in 1906. But nevermind all that, H-D is the real deal and everybody copied or copies them…
          So once again, you idolize the bar and shield? More power to you. Just try to accept that not everybody adheres to your ideals.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            And where are they now?

          • Clutchman11

            And in what way is that relevant to being original and or the “real deal”? The relevance in my previous reply is, that following Tanners and your logic, everyone who buys an H-D is actually buying a copy of one of the other marques, and thus not buying the “real deal” as H-D itself made use of configurations that others had already put on the market.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            You are right, but those marquees no longer exist. Even if Harley subsumed some of their characteristics, other manufacturers are now copying the trends Harley is setting, for example the Dark Custom line, the bobbers, even the blatant Japanese copies of Harley models. Compared to them, Harley is the real deal and they are the copycats.

          • Clutchman11

            Even though I do see what you’re saying, I still can’t agree with you. All manufacturers will copy from each other. That goes for H-D as well. Dark Custom? The “copy cat” japanese were building chromeless machines 20+ years ago. Bobbers? If you do want to attribute that to H-D, they copied that from independent builders, so hardly the ‘real deal’. In fact, H-D is starting to roll out liquid cooling in various guises. Guess who’s been doing that for a couple decades now, long before H-D did? Long, low slung cruisers? Others did that at the same time, and in some cases before H-D. So no, that’s not “original H-D” either.
            Harley did run with the cruiser idea, and stuck to it almost single mindedly I’ll give you that.

            Even so: “[] Harley subsumed some of their characteristics, other manufacturers are now copying…” You do know that that reads like: Harley copied others and took over/learned from their ideas. So Harley is original and the real deal. Others are doing the exact same thing, but they can’t be the “real deal”.

    • Born to Ride

      I was recently bit with the cruiser bug and decided that I wanted to try something new. Harleys are dime a dozen where I live, with fat bobs and road kings on every corner. If you conform to the idea that the hive mind is always right, you would be correct in assuming it’s the real deal. But let’s say that image and “fitting in” with the club isn’t even on the spectrum of priorities and you just want the best bike that is soulful and fun to ride. I’m that case there are far better options than the bar and shield, and I have no nagging thoughts that I should have bought an inferior bike that everyone else has.

  • Steve McLaughlin

    The stock Scout is an extraordinary bike. Well worth the effort to trade in my Sportster. If I put the old style seat on it and bob the fenders, I have a better bike than this one and for the same or less cost, with a much better rear suspension. Pegs are fine, but real Scouts have floorboards.

  • Zimmerframe Racing

    Not bad for this style of bike, but Triumph’s Bonneville bobber looks a lot closer to the real thing – leaner, cleaner, and with 3″ of rear travel from a hardtail-looking frame. Natural matchup for a shootout, methinks.

  • Bmwclay

    Put the motor into a standard frame and the pegs under you. Put 5 inches of suspension on either end and standard ABS and tach. Now you got something. Then I wouldn’t have to choose between T120 and CB1100ex to park between my Corvette and Porchce SUV!

  • elgar

    Nice review Ryan! I feel that this whole ‘bobber’ thing is getting a bit ‘cliche’. There’s nothing ‘unique’ about it when everyone makes one. It tells me that this ‘flavor du jour’ will go away soon, but hey, to each their own! If it’s got 2 wheels, it’s always cool and more performance (better ergos, suspension, brakes, ground clearance) is always ‘cooler’.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      There is less suspension and less ground clearance. Besides, everyone said scramblers were a fad and they are still selling like hot cakes. Bobbers have always been around, at least Harley bobbers.

  • michael folk

    I THINK I WILL KEEP MY V-ROD IT IS FAST, RELIABLE AND EASY TO MAINTAIN .PLUS IT FITS IN THE BARN WITH THE REST OF THE HARLEYS I OWN –5– 73–2003 OLD DOGS DONT CHANGE THEIR WAYS

    • Born to Ride

      GOOD TO KNOW FRIEND

      • michael folk

        I AM SORTA OL SCHOOL YA KNOW

        • Sayyed Bashir

          A V-Rod is not old school.

          • michael folk

            I KNOW THAT BUT I AM RIDING A 73 SHOVEL I BOUGHT NEW WHICH PUTS IT AT 44 YEARS OLD —SO I WOULD SAY OL SCHOOL–AND I JUST SOLD MY 1975 SPORTSTER 5 DAYS AGO– IT WAS OL SCHOOL –THEN THERE IS MY TWIN CAM –IT IS A 2006 WHICH I BUILT A HARD TAIL FRAME FOR IN THE OL SCHOOL STYLE SO I WOULD SAY I AM OL SCHOOL—WHAT DO YOU RIDE THAT YOU BEEN ON FOR OVER 5 YEARS OR MORE—I ALSO HAVE A 1973 AND A 1974 MOTO GUZZIE S — WHICH I RIDE THE 73 STILL TODAY–I HAVE HAD THAT 15 YEARS –AND LAST I HAVE A 1973 750 X 4 HONDA I HAVE OWNED THAT 12 YEARS NOW SO OLD SCHOOL IS ALIVE AND WELL AROUND HERE –EVEN THOUGH I RIDE A 03 V-ROD WHICH WAS WON ON A SLOT MACHINE IN VEGAS OUT MIKE

            Sent from Outlook

          • Sayyed Bashir

            I am sorry, that was meant as a compliment. I ride a 2007 Harley Softail Custom on which I have put 156,000 miles so far. I have two other bikes.

          • michael folk

            AINT NO REASON TO BE SORRY AND THANKS FOR THE COMPLIMENT I DONT GET EXCITED ANY MORE I AM TO YOUNG FOR THAT AT 69 I GOT BETTER THINGS TO DO AND PLACES TO GO — ENJOY YOUR DAY –SEE YA OUT THERE— MIKE

            Sent from Outlook

    • LS650

      THANKS FOR LETTING US KNOW.

      • michael folk

        YOUR WELCOME — IT NEVER HURTS TO BE WELL INFORMED — AND NOW YOU ARE — ENJOY YOUR DAY– I AM

        Sent from Outlook

  • Tim Sawatzky

    Indian always makes such nice bikes. I would much rather have an Indian than a Harley. But if I was looking for a “Bobber” I think Triumph did it a little better than this. Thier bobber looks different than the standard T120. This is still nice, but looks like a chopped Scout. I would never spend that kind of money on one, but I’m not the demographic they are going after. Now if I could only win the lottery and get a Cheiftain…

    • DickRuble

      Not even the demographic they’re after know they are a demographic. It’s a something that exists only in the atrophied peanut brain of some desk bound Polaris marketing executives: young cretins with money that are looking to be uncomfortable on an expensive, poorly handling caricature of a motorcycle.

  • Mike Hansuld

    Nice looking bike.Needs to be raised a little so it doesn’t drag pegs in hard cornering.But most people buying this kind of bike is going to make changes to make it their own. Harley has made a ton on aftermarket add ons. Yamaha is doing it now with the star.So why not Indian.

  • therr850

    A lot of knocks on ABS but it is those mufflers that have me muffed. They’re HUGE! Here come another set of really loud noise tubes.

    • Paragon Lost

      Maybe they put the catalytic converter in the pipes? As is being done with a lot of other bikes these days.

  • Tim Quinn

    “20 horses more motor than a Sportster.”
    I had a 2015 Sportster Forty-Eight that I really liked, but I just traded it for a 2017 Softail Slim.
    However, there’s no way in hell my Sportster 1200 was crankin’ out 80 horsepower.
    You need to fix that typo.

  • TheMarvelous1310

    Luckily I was planning on putting new shocks on anything I bought. This is a wonderful application for 4 1/2 inches of travel, I think.

  • Craig Hoffman

    The “Highs” column pretty much makes this a compelling bike. The Indian motor is a sweet one – hoping to see more of it in various settings.

  • Kevin Polito

    Now that Moto Guzzi, Triumph, and Indian each have a model called Bobber, it’s time for a What About Bob? comparo.

  • Kevin Polito

    The Indian Bobber is a bar-hopper. It’s geared toward someone who likes the biker image but doesn’t actually like to ride that much. It’s comfortable enough to ride from home to the nearest bar. It’s a good bike on which to make an entrance, and it will allow burnouts when departing.