In a year that sees Harley-Davidson list a total of 38 motorcycle models, the Motor Company has decided to add two more muscular choices to the list. The 2016 Low Rider S enters the fray as the the most powerful non-CVO Dyna cruiser ever offered by Harley-Davidson. Similarly, the exclusive CVO line gets a new stylishly aggressive (or is that aggressively stylish) member in the form of the 2016 CVO Pro Street Breakout, delivering drag-bike performance to discriminating Harley customers.

2016 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

Low Rider S

Mixing blacked-out styling with in-your-face V-Twin performance, the Low Rider S joins the Fat Boy S and Softail Slim S models. The heart and soul of these bikes is the Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam 110 engine which is the largest-displacement factory-installed engine Harley-Davidson produces. Feeding those air-cooled cylinders are a Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather performance intake and Fat Bob-style 2-into-2 exhaust. Sound beefy? How does 115 lb-ft. of peak torque at 3500 rpm strike you? To tame the 13% torque increase over the standard Low Rider, a heavy-duty clutch delivers the power to the Cruise Drive 6-speed transmission. Just because the engine has more grunt doesn’t mean it can’t be civilized, too. So, cruise control is a standard feature.

Harley Davidson 2016 Models Announced Via Worldwide Live-Stream Event

The Low Rider S delivers creature comforts and handling via Premium Ride nitrogen gas-charged emulsion shocks and a Premium Ride cartridge fork. Dual floating front discs and a solo rear get the ABS treatment for optimal speed attenuation. The flat drag bar features 5.5-in. risers positioning the rider’s paws in an aggressive forward stance while the mid-mount controls put the pegs in a comfortable position. The 26.6 in. solo seat features a shape to help the rider combat the accelerative forces.

2016 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

The 2016 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S has the most powerful factory installed engine available.

Stylistically, the Low Rider S looks to the performance machinery of the 1960s and 1970s. From the gold tank badge that harkens the 1977 XLCR Café Racer model to the Magnum Gold lightweight cast-aluminum wheels that are reminiscent of the gold-tone magnesium wheels on ’60s race machines, this S makes a strong statement. The multiple black color treatments (glossy on the bodywork, semi-gloss on the exhaust, crinkle on the engine) define a subtle color palette to increase the Low Rider S’ menace, while a bikini fairing gives a sporting profile.

2016 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S

The retro-styled wheels on the 2016 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S add to the sporting profile.

Still, according to Harley-Davidson Senior Stylist Dais Nagao, it’s not all for appearance: “When you ride fast in this upright position, you need a little wind protection. Then the way we inset the headlamp deeper into the speed screen gives the Low Rider S an aggressive face. It’s a powerful way to communicate the personality of the motorcycle.”

The Low Rider S MSRP is $16,699.

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout

CVO Pro Street Breakout

From the nothing-exceeds-like-excess department, the CVO Pro Street Breakout continues the CVO tradition of mounting a hotted-up engine and then outfitting the beast with top-of-the-line accessories highlighting an exclusive paint scheme. The CVO Pro Street Breakout features a Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam 110B for the most power available from a Harley-Davidson production air-cooled engine. Additionally, since Harley often debuts new custom features and manufacturing techniques on the CVO models prior to allowing them to trickle down to other machinery, the CVO Pro Street Breakout displays some new finish treatments.

“The Pro Street Breakout represents a new dimension of CVO motorcycles,” said Harley-Davidson Styling Director Brad Richards. “The Pro Street Breakout takes its cues from the streets and reflects our own changing tastes. It still delivers the depth of detail and value and the bragging rights the CVO customer expects, but gets there in a different way. Its colors may be subdued but also have incredible depth. We’re developing alternate finishes to bright chrome – brushed and anodized surfaces and tinted clear-coat, for example. The Breakout really lent itself to this new styling direction.”

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout

The 2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout features a variety of metal finishes.

The Pro Street Breakout uses Smoke Satin Chrome as a prime example:

“We worked intensely with our plating suppliers to develop the hue and depth of Smoke Satin Chrome, and we are the first to use it in the motorcycle industry,” said Nagao. “It’s a finish that looks really contemporary and exclusive but also kind of sinister. We’ve carefully placed Smoke Satin Chrome next to a black surface so it creates a layered effect. For example, the top rocker cover is gloss black, and the lower cover is Smoke Satin Chrome. It’s on the exhaust header shields next to the black engine and black mufflers. We used Smoke Satin Chrome on the oil lines and fittings to add an unexpected detail.”

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout

The Scorched Chrome wheel finish is exclusive to the 2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout.

The Aggressor custom wheels feature an additional new finish called Scorched Chrome. The drag-racer-inspired styling gives the impression that the chrome isn’t the only thing that the CVO Pro Street Breakout will scorch. The details are all there: 1.25-inch drag-style handlebar, the slippery speed screen, and the color-matched chin spoiler. The bucket seat with the sizable bolstered pillion assist the rider in staying in the cockpit once the trigger is pulled.

Despite the exclusive good looks, CVOs have always been about the ultimate in factory performance. The CVO Pro Street Breakout uses black blunt-cut mufflers and an open-element Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather Elite to flow the maximum atmosphere possible through the Screamin’ Eagle Twin Cam 110B. Add in the hydraulically actuated Assist & Slip clutch for controlling the power delivery, and you’ve got the prescription for an arm-straightening ride.

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout: a minimalist, yet exclusive cockpit.

The suspension, with its 43mm inverted fork rigidly mounted within a beefy three-bolt triple-clamp, mounts to a 19-in. front wheel for street cred and stability. The meaty 240mm rear tire handles pavement abuse duties. Since things that go fast must also stop, dual 300mm discs with floating rotors have their calipers’ four pistons squeeze controlled by a Reduced Reach front brake lever. ABS provides additional safety.

The 2016 Harley-Davidson Pro Street Breakout carries a $25,699 MSRP.

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout

2016 Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout.

Visit H-D.com for availability information.

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  • TalonMech

    Oh look! Another cruiser from HD. Same engine, frame, suspension, and accessories as several other HDs, but put together in a different sequence, and painted black this time. Should match all the black leather vests and HD branded tee shirts quite nicely. Be sure and wear a bandana on your head though. Safety first.

    • john phyyt

      But but; This one is totally different; It has a forward facing air filter ; Just like the mesh filter on a Ducati bevel so that when it rains?

      • Sayyed Bashir

        John Phyyt: smart people put a rain cover on the forward facing air filter if rain is expected.

    • Evans Brasfield

      NEWS FLASH: Internet user complains about a news post he doesn’t like rather than just ignoring the article.

      Stay tuned for more on this rapidly developing situation.

      • Craig Hoffman

        Indeed. Poor form to pee in the cornflakes here. Guess I have received one too many “get a real bike” comments from me too weekend warrior types on their Harleys and dressed like pirates. Those “rebels” are in the majority. As Bob Seeger said, “always seem outnumbered, don’t dare make a stand”. Well unless I am playing the Internet tough guy on a keyboard. I suck. At least I admit it – LOL

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Not all of them are weekend warriors. Some are real warriors and are willing to defend their position. The point is to love your own bike and not diss other people’s bikes. That is called being respectful and civilized. Hopefully this point is not lost on foreign bike riders.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      If you don’t like HDs, shouldn’t you be reading other articles? What are you doing wasting your own and our precious time here? Do you know of any other bike that generates 115 lb-ft of torque at only 3500 rpm (enough to break your neck off) like the Low Rider S for only $16,700? I will be talking to my HD dealer tomorrow about trading in my 2007 Harley Softail with 141,000 miles. See you on the road. I’ll be the one riding a 2016 Low Rider S and wearing a fully loaded black leather vest. John Phyyt: intelligent people put a rain cover on the forward facing air filter when rain is expected, if you didn’t already know.

      • TalonMech

        Of course you’ll be wearing your black vest. How else will everyone know you’re a rebel, who doesn’t play by the rules, unless you dress like, and ride the same bike as all the other rebels, who don’t play by the rules.
        You are correct about the torque though. It surely wouldn’t take nearly that much to rip my (or anyone’s) neck off. Not something I typically worry about when riding a motorcycle, but technically, you’re right. Two giant pistons bouncing up and down will generally produce a good deal of torque. They will also shake the shit out of everything they’re connected to. I’ll take a nice smooth engine with less torque any day. Enjoy your new Harley.

      • Dr Nigel Nicholson

        The Triumph Thunderbird Storm produces 115 lb/ft of torque, is black on black on black, has flat bars and midpoint foot pegs. Sells for $14,999 and has been available since 2011.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          At what rpm?

          • http://batman-news.com Nico du Plooy

            My Massey Fergusson 35 does 122 lb.ft at 1600
            rpm. Polaris will soon teach H-D to
            speak Horsepower. The Victory Octane is
            undoubtedly the reason for these knee-jerks.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Harley will never produce high rpm engines. That is not what their customer base wants. No one cares what Victory does.

          • http://batman-news.com Nico du Plooy

            Of course. I am talking horsepower, not rpm – of which H-Ds
            have precious little, as we all know. It is funny how every time one of the ‘customer base’ notices my Hammer (94 hp at
            5300 rpm) on the road, or at the traffic light, they will attempt to take it on. And every time, without fail, they get their @sses handed back to them. Probably part of the reason they got such a bad attitude, I suppose – constantly having to defend the sizzle, with the missing sausage.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Harley riders have a bad attitude because they know they can kick anyone’s @ss without having to prove it.

          • http://batman-news.com Nico du Plooy

            Now you’re talking! I will bring my 2014 KTM 1190 Adventure S. It does to R1200GS Beemers what my Victory does to Harleys.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Good! You have some good bikes. I still love my 2007 Harley Softail too. It is a badass bike. Can’t say that about beemers. Are you anywhere near California?

          • Dr Nigel Nicholson

            Kevin Ash in his 2011 Telegraph review of the Storm reports 115 lbs/ft torque at 2,950 rpm.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            OK, that sounds like a good bike. I wonder how many they have sold. The Triumph Rocket III was also a monstrous bike but I only saw one on the road many years ago. The Low Rider S is a successor to the legendary FXR bikes and will be hugely successful. It is the highest performance reasonably priced bike from Harley.

          • Dr Nigel Nicholson

            Thank you Sayyed. I enjoy riding my Storm and my Bonneville very much. Best way to retire I could imagine.

      • Robert James

        anytime you want to match that bike against my Kawasaki Connie,feel free

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Are you talking about a Concours? That is a touring bike. Why would I run a dragster against a tourer? Anyway the Low Rider S doesn’t arrive at dealers until March.

    • TheMarvelous1310 .

      Yeah, and your opinion is just as stale. Nobody made you click on an article about bikes you know you don’t like, stop punishing us for your decisions.

  • Mahatma

    I like that CVO cockpit though.Very stylish.

  • 12er

    so 4 frames and 38 models?

    • Sayyed Bashir

      40 models.

      • Emptybee

        What, no adventure bike? I was so close to buying a Ulysses just before H-D up and kicked Buell out of the tent.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          HD has no plans to get in the dirt. Their core buyer is street rider. KTM has the dirt and adventure and hooligan markets covered.

          • Emptybee

            So there’s not “something for everyone”?

          • Sayyed Bashir

            You are right. Something for every street rider. I was answering the original commenter who was saying 38 models based on 4 frames (or 4 engines) and wanted to show the diversity of the entire 40 model lineup.

    • Starmag

      Nailed it. I would have said 4 engines 38 models, but they might have the same frame too. I’ve never owned a Harley, but 260,000 high profit bikes a year, year after year with only 4 engines is marketing genius. They sure are polarizing though. I’ll give the pirates this, they actually put huge miles on their bikes compared to the self righteous Power Rangers faction.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        I have 141,000 miles on my 2007 Softail Custom. Had 56,000 miles on my 1986 Softail Custom. HD sold 300,000 bikes in 2015. KTM sold 180,000 bikes in 2015. I have 9,000 miles on my 2015 KTM 1190 Adventure R.

  • Craig Hoffman

    Funny money for the SOS in a slightly different wrapper.

  • DickRuble

    Yaaaaawnn…Lemme see… What other bike can I buy for $26K? A Kawasaki H2? Or a BMW K1300s, a gas station, and a lifetime subscription to motorcycle.com?

  • Shlomi

    So what? They all look the same.

  • michael jackson

    Well its official hd has embraced jappinse technology

  • ColoradoS14

    First, listen up you knuckleheads I know they are different bikes in different categories and don’t compete head to head, but I look at the CVO PS and the Triumph Thruxton R and just laugh and laugh. Both are somewhat “retro” bikes with modern touches and a custom flair. But the fact that the HD is TWICE the price just makes me giggle. I assume that Harley Davidson is run by some Mr. Burns type character just laughing at the jokers who have bought in to the image of the brand and are now slaves with hive mind syndrome.

    • John A. Stockman

      Low seat height is not the important part or the end-all-be-all, and I’m a short guy. It compromises suspension performance/travel and severely limits lean angles. 23.5 to 24 degrees now on the Breakout, Low bikes and others? Ridiculous. How many riders have come around a corner and something is in the road or a car is over the center line and you need to tighten up your line to avoid it/them? I have. Riding at a sedate pace, which was dictated by the Sportster I was on. No racing emulation. The back tire was levered off the tarmac trying to turn in tighter so I didn’t become a hood ornament on the car that was in my lane in the right hand curve. 25 degrees of lean angle. I can imagine what it’s like on one of those “Low” models with even less cornering clearance. I did see HD gave people a bit more rear suspension travel this model year on some bikes. From 2″ of usable travel to 3″. Their sales people are told to emphasize the low seat height during the showroom sitting-on-the-bike experience and how comfortable it is. Much different on the road with all your weight on the tail bone and your feet out in front where you can’t use them to mediate the short suspension travel. Still the best paint and chrome in the biz…and the best marketing. Buy what you want, ride what you love, just be genuine. Not told that you’re “different”. Not different or innovative, nor a rebel or individual, if someone is doing what a large group of other people are doing. There is a definition of that…

      • schizuki

        I’ve got an Iron. Two weeks after I got it I took a corner and the frame tried to lever off the road, I went home and ordered a 2″-over-stock set of Progressives. Handles nice now, although it’s still choppy as f*** over bumps.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      ColoradoS14, buy and ride the bikes you like, and leave other people’s bikes alone. As you said, you don’t know why people buy them and you never will, so why bother blessing us with your uninformed opinion? If money is the only thing that worries you, why don’t you buy the CSC RX-3? It is a different bike in a different category, but it is a third of the price of your Triumph.

      • ColoradoS14

        Of course. I agree wholeheartedly to ride the bike you like and forget what others say. But, I do notice what, to me, seems to be a dramatic lack of bang for the buck in the HD lineup. They bring to the table less technology, less mechanical advancement, less reliability, etc. than many other brands and charge a premium for it based on the name and nostalgia. I understand that this matters little to most folks who are buying them. You have to admit that the price point is silly, what exotic materials are they using, what top shelf suspension or brake components are they sourcing? They are charging a $10k premium over lesser models and I just am not sure that the juice can match the squeeze. Then again, if I had the money I would happily buy a Ducati Superleggera so maybe I am just full of shit. lol

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Like they say “If I have to explain, you wouldn’t understand”. What is the appeal of the Harley over other brands? Why can they command a premium over other similar or better bikes and people eagerly pay the price? Why are they selling 265,000 bikes a year while other brands are languishing? There are a lot of reasons, but if you understood them, you would be buying a Harley too. Since you don’t, it does not matter what you buy. The people who buy Harleys are not stupid. Like I said before, buy and ride what you like, and leave the other bikes alone.

  • michael franklin

    ZZZZ…wake me when it’s over

    • Sayyed Bashir

      If the article was that boring, you wouldn’t have bothered reading it, and there wouldn’t be 58 comments in 4 days.

  • Mark Vizcarra

    Ha. The breakout looks like a yamaha raider

    • Sayyed Bashir

      For your information SOA is just a fake poser TV show. It will attract the real one percenters who revere the original FXR, of which the new Low Rider S is a direct descendant.

  • spiff

    Yeah, Harleys evolve slow. If you are looking for real differences you need to compare decades. That’s not going to change. I do like the first pic, kind of an eighties look. It could be the black with gold rims, but also the stance. Almost like they uses my brother in laws Virago as inspiration. I love eighties bikes, and would love to see the style come back. Fazers, V65 Magnas, square headlights and all.

    • schizuki

      Yeah, that’s when I discovered bikes, so they’re my sweet spot, too. Don’t forget GPz’s, Interceptors and Ducati F1’s.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Virago copied the Harley style, not the other way around.

      • spiff

        Inspired by a Harley, but unmistakably an 80s Yamaha. That First pic made me think of a Virago.

  • ADB

    “with in-your-face V-Twin performance……..”

  • schizuki

    Hmmm… Jack up the rear suspension on that Low Rider S to level out the stance, give it a swoopy tail, and it puts one in mind of the XLCR. Which, by the way, it kills me that Harley will not re-make. C’mon, H-D, throw the XR1200 engine in an XLCR body!

  • Born to Ride

    Low Rider S is a nice looking bike, and 16.7 is a relative friggin bargain as far as Harley is concerned. Almost makes me wish I didn’t hate the feet forward riding position with no rear wheel travel. Almost.

    • schizuki

      “The flat drag bar features 5.5-in. risers positioning the rider’s paws
      in an aggressive forward stance while the >>>MID-MOUNT CONTROLS<<< put the
      pegs in a comfortable position."

      And the rear wheel travel can be cured with longer shocks (C'mon, it's a Harley. It's a 90% complete kit bike)

      • Born to Ride

        Ha, goes to show you what side of the spectrum I’m on. Last time I checked, ()&^><MID-MOUNT CONTROLS****+++—// still put your feet in front of you.

        Though I will agree with you that Harleys are 90% complete, and just about nobody rides them bone stock.

        • schizuki

          Ah, I gotcha. You’re correct, “mid-mount” for Harley probably is “feet forward” everywhere else. My Sporty has what I feel is a really nice, neutral riding position, but I can see how others might find the pegs out too far.

          • Born to Ride

            Yeah I like my pegs right under me. Grew up riding dirt bikes and that is what feels right. I almost wrecked a Honda Rebel during my MSF course after spending 3 hours prior riding a Hawk 250. My dad owns a Diavel and those pegs are about as far forward as I would ever be completely comfortable with.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      No feet forward position on the Low Rider S. Mid mount controls.

      • Born to Ride

        I am aware of this inherent compromise in the design of the bike. I was simply pointing out that the bike looks great, but the ergonomics would simply be a no-go for me. If I was the kind of guy that just decorated my garage with bikes instead of riding them, I’d have one in a heartbeat.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          I have been riding Harleys for over 30 years and find them to be the most comfortable bikes for long distance riding. I started with a 1985 883 Sportster, then a 1986 Softail Custom on which I did 56,000 miles and kept for 16 years, and now a 2007 Softail Custom which has 141,000 miles. I don’t see what the problem is with a feet forward relaxed riding position. I don’t believe in buying bikes just to decorate a garage. I use them everyday.

          • Born to Ride

            Agree to disagree, I’d estimate that I’m up to 80,000 miles between the 4 bikes I’ve owned since 2009. As far as cruisers go, I have ridden a Sportster, a Star Bolt, a Victory Judge, a Victory Vegas, a Honda Rebel, and a Ducati Diavel. I consider none of those bikes even remotely as comfortable or confident as my Triumph Sprint, and for me they didn’t come close to the “rightness” of my S2R1000. I’m just not a cruiser guy it would seem, but not for a lack of willingness to ride.

  • Buzz

    I really like the Dyna but I’d have to put longer rear shocks on it immediately. I wish H-D would dump the lowered stance on every single model.

    I still like my Moto-Guzzi 1400 better.

  • Mark Fossatl

    Wow if they can pull off this marketing for 2016, Wow what a bunch of followers, Every Harley looks and sounds the same with the same poor maintenance forth coming lol, Gonna get my ass chewed here but just have to throw in my 1st ride was a 1958 BSA, 2nd ride a 71 Sporster but really love my 2014 Yamaha Strat S. See ya at the track

    • Sayyed Bashir

      So you are comparing a 1971 Sportster to a 2016 Harley (you are really showing your age with that 1958 BSA). So in 45 years nothing could have changed? The quality couldn’t have gotten better, Harley couldn’t have exceeded European manufacturers (such as BMW) in quality, and gotten close to Japanese quality? Get real! As I have mentioned elsewhere, I have 141,000 miles on my 2007 Softail Custom and it is still going strong. Just look at the new Harleys and you will see. Nothing against your Yamaha but it doesn’t hold a candle to a Harley, especially this new Low Rider S.

  • TheMarvelous1310 .

    Low Rider S, you have my attention! That motor, better shocks and mid controls are exactly what I want in a Dyna, and the rear fender’s already been bobbed how I want it, AND it comes with a subtle little fairing! It’s the perfect midsize Harley, just enough Super Glide to make it interesting without cranking the price unduly. I just hope that A) the suspension is taller than usual, and B) I can switch one of those pipes to the left. I don’t know why they’re so determined not to put a pipe on both sides…

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Pipes are on the right side so you (or your significant other) don’t burn your legs while getting off or standing next to the bike on the left side (if you are wearing shorts or your significant other is wearing a skirt). They get hot enough to melt off the skin. Don’t ask me how I know.

      • TheMarvelous1310 .

        Oh, I know how you know. *rubs inner calf*

  • Mark Fossatl

    Well someone bought my trick comments, Lol
    If harley hadn’t borrowed brains from the metric trade they would have been out of business.
    Future exhaust federal requirements will mandate they all smell and sound the same.
    They all look the same sad for sure

    • Sayyed Bashir

      What did Harley borrow from your foreign bikes? Harleys do not look like, feel like or sound like metric bikes. That is why Harleys sell, and metric bikes stagnate in warehouses for many years.

      • KLRJUNE .

        Bragging about Harley is like bragging about a fat ass.

  • Old MOron

    Oh gee, I ignore this article for a couple of days, and look what happens.
    All you kool-aid swigging Harley faithful, enjoy yourselves. That is your privilege.

    But when you start getting uppity, when you start saying Harley’s are the best and Harley riders can kick everyone’s ass without even trying, well, don’t complain when the rest of us laugh at “The Emperor’s New Clothes”.

  • Luca Manni

    CVO Pro Street Breakout: they copied me? :-)

    https://it.pinterest.com/deuce2000/hi-tech-deuce/

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Nice bike, but no. No bobbed rear fender, no staggered exhaust pipes, no inverted forks, no blacked out everything, no two piece seat, no fat bob tank, no sculptured oil tank, no exotic finishes. The air filter doesn’t look like a heavy breather. What are all those hoses and things behind and below the air filter?

      • Luca Manni

        also the tires are not equal, air caps in wheels, knobs, platforms, … OBVIOUSLY I was not referring to the details (which frankly I like more than my bike) but the PRO-STREET look in general!

        my bike is so for 16 years, the BrakeOut is just out.

        As? you do not know what those tubes in the picture? maybe you’re not so experienced then

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Your bike is nice, I don’t know what those tubes are. It is not precision cooling, and it is not nitrous oxide. Returning oil to the crankcase? I have never seen them before. Also the air filter and the things behind it.

  • 281Marauder .

    Am I the only one who can’t tell these two bikes apart?

  • Mark Fossatl

    I can’t afford the air to put in the HD tires let alone the costly service repairs and maintenance.
    Vote for Hillary and all the HD will sound like the kamakazi metrics anyway, Kidding aside regardless of how much stuff you accessorize they all look and sound the same, You have just been cloned by marketing Harley Davidson. lol

  • Mark Fossatl

    If someone wants to buy me a fully dressed new Harley i would be happy to reserve judgment until the first 12,000 miles, Just send the check to Marysville Wa. HD store.