2016 Ducati XDiavel S

Editor Score: 90.5%
Engine 19.0/20
Suspension/Handling 13.5/15
Transmission/Clutch 8.5/10
Brakes 9.0/10
Instruments/Controls5.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 9.25/10
Desirability 9.25/10
Value 8.5/10
Overall Score90.5/100

What do the Diavel and the XDiavel have in common? According to Ducati, aside from six letters in their names, only brake calipers and tires. So, despite the similarities of the names – and even in profile – Ducati calls the 2016 XDiavel the company’s first true cruiser. Don’t think of this as a boardroom construction meant to fill in a particular check mark on a manufacturer’s list of necessary products. As Claudio Domenicali, the Ducati Motor Holding SpA Chief Executive Officer, said just this morning over breakfast, Ducati doesn’t focus-group its bikes to death. Instead, the company builds the bikes it wants, the bikes that scratch a creative itch, and lets the chips fall where they may.

2011 Ducati Diavel Review

The XDiavel is a perfect example of the Ducati design approach. First, the designers decided what constitutes a cruiser as seen through its research of the American market. Next, the designers processed the information through the filter of Ducati styling, technology and performance to settle on what the key features would be. In the case of the XDiavel, the cruiser traits are relaxed, low-speed riding, the call of travel, and a feet-forward riding position. On the Ducati half of the DNA, signature Italian style crafted with the latest engineering and delivering a hefty dose of performance. This folding together of the somewhat contradictory design goals is what puts the X in XDiavel.

2016 Ducati XDiavel action

The Heart of a Champion

While the engine is always important in a motorcycle, in cruisers it is the crown jewel, the centerpiece of the bike’s design while simultaneously being the heart of its functionality. The Ducati Testastretta DVT 1262 takes this to the extreme – in a most positive way. With the Multistrada 1200 engine as its starting point, Ducati’s engineers massaged and reshaped the L-Twin to a form more appropriate for Ducati-style cruiser duty. The 1262cc displacement comes courtesy of a longer stroke, yielding bore and stroke dimensions of 106.0mm x 71.5mm.

The DVT moniker in the name stands for Desmodromic Variable Timing, which first appeared in the Multistrada 1200 last year, where it varies the timing of both the intake and exhaust camshafts independently, allowing the engine to deliver the seemingly impossible bottom-end grunt and top-end oomph. (To learn about DVT, our 2015 Ducati Multistrada 1200 And 1200S First Ride Review has all the details – including video.)

2016 Ducati XDiavel engine right side

The machined belt covers of the XDiavel S highlight the L-shape of the cylinders. The trellis frame and the swingarm pivot assembly use the engine as a stressed member.

Cruiser riders don’t normally spin their bike’s engine up to the rpm limit. Instead, they usually rely on the bottom-end torque as the primary motivating factor. Ducati have clearly studied this phenomena and have moved to address this with the XDiavel. The result is a claimed torque peak of 95 lb-ft at 5,000 rpm. While that rpm level may be a bit high for traditional cruisers – in fact, on many cruisers, that would be approaching the rev ceiling – the peak is significantly lower than on the previous Diavel and then remains relatively flat until 7,500 rpm.

However, what cruiser riders typically have not experienced is the soul-stirring, deep intake howl emitted as the Testastretta’s superbike roots come online, thrusting the XDiavel forward with such force that they’ll be thankful for the bolster at the back of the seat, since the feet-and-hands-forward riding position gives the rider very little with which to combat the acceleration other than upper body strength. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Spy Shots: Ducati Diavel Gets A Makeover!

Compression was bumped from 12.5:1 on the MTS to a healthy 13:1 on the XDiavel. While the Bosch electronic injection system utilizes the same 56mm elliptical throttle bodies, the ride-by-wire (RbW) has, not surprisingly, been completely reworked. Ducati being Ducati, the engine also has a host of electronic goodies to provide the rider with a variety of power delivery options. The three riding modes are: Sport, Touring, and Urban – each of which also features distinct Ducati Traction Control (DTC) and ABS settings.

2016 Ducati XDiavel tank and instruments

The TFT display is easy to read in all lighting conditions, relaying all the information needed at a glance.

From a power delivery perspective, the Sport mode naturally brings all 156 horses into play with the relationship between the right grip and the throttle’s butterflies a 1:1 ratio, giving the most direct relationship with the rider. The DTC is also set to its least intrusive preset level. In Touring mode, the whole stable is still available, but at lower rpm the throttle response is softened by lessening the ratio of wrist input to throttle opening. However, as the rider opens the throttle further, the ratio changes to the point that, in the widest portions of throttle opening, it ultimately returns to the 1:1 ratio of Sport mode. Urban mode drops power output to 100 hp and further softens the throttle inputs to civilize the savage in the confines of the city – and presumably slippery conditions. DTC gets progressively more assertive with Touring and Urban modes.

Here’s where regular readers, who are familiar with my penchant for smooth throttle response, may be in for a surprise. In my quest for bobble-free on-off-on throttle transitions on the street, I am often willing to sacrifice a bit of power on the altar of smoothness. Frequently, I feel that RbW Sport mode is shorthand for abrupt mode, and Normal is actually the most streetable setting. Well, the XDiavel lays that belief to rest.

2016 Ducati XDiavel muffler

The old Diavel used scrambler-styled mufflers, but the XDiavel tucks its exhaust system under the engine and in front of the rear wheel to allow the engine and single-sided rear wheel to be displayed.

I began my day in San Diego’s morning traffic in Urban mode and found it to be friendly. Once the ride breached the city limits, Touring offered plenty of power with no feeling of disconnection between the grip and the rear wheel. I was content to ride like this for quite a while. However, when I switched to Sport, I was amazed at how smooth throttle transitions were. Deliberately shifting from acceleration to neutral throttle to acceleration to deceleration and back on the gas – mid-corner – were greeted with buttery-smooth power modulation with nary a hint of abruptness. The XDiavel stayed in Sport for the remainder of the day with the only exception being quick trips into the other modes to check their performance when we encountered different riding situations.

While we’re on the topic of power, let’s take a moment to consider the XDiavel’s output. While Ducati’s reps made much of the increase in torque in the bottom end of the rpm range when compared to the old Diavel – and it was there – the XD still doesn’t clear its throat until the tach clears 3,500 rpm. Below that, the engine will accelerate, but it also shudders as the cylinders try to deliver thrust from each power stroke. Above 4,000 rpm, it’s ready to rock. The Testastretta’s superbike powerplant gives riders the luxury of choosing two riding techniques. One can loaf along in a single gear rolling between 4,000 and 6,500 rpm content to use the engine as a giant rheostat, or if you’re in the mood for some shenanigans, drop down a gear or two and let the L-Twin pleasure you aurally. However, the real joy of the XD comes from turning the loud tap to 11 and holding on for dear life.

2016 Ducati XDiavel action

The forward thrust provided by the linear powerband up to those 156 horses is exciting. Add in the clamshell riding position in which your grip and upper body strength (plus an appreciated assist from the seat’s bolster) are the only things holding you on the bike, and you’re in for the ride of a lifetime. I’ve ridden a ton of hopped up cruisers, including a dual-supercharged Valkyrie, and no factory cruiser has ever widened my eyes to such an extreme. One of my compatriots topped the ton in third gear. In one instance, I saw a speed (with way more on tap) that would cause my father to call me with the reminder that I have young children that need me if I included it in this article.

Taming the Beast

The new electronic feature that has been the topic of much discussion amongst the MO staff is the DucatiPowerLaunch (DPL). This special launch mode is so cool that it gets its own button safely tucked away behind the front brake reservoir. Pressing the DPL button directs the rider to a screen with three choices. The first gives the least intervention in the form of DTC and Wheelie Control, while the third gives the most. Once the level of protection is selected, a screen tells the rider to place the transmission in first and crank the throttle WFO. Once you’re underway, the electronics take over to save your butt until you either reach 74.6 mph (120 km/h) or you shift to third gear. Also, it disengages if your speed drops to 3.1 mph (5 km/h). Other than stating that the DPL would only allow three launches before a prescribed cool-down period was enforced, the press briefing covered nothing else about this mode.

2016 Ducati XDiavel grip and mirror

The switch gear includes red LED lighting for easy night access.

During one of the photo stops, I asked a ride leader if there was a place scheduled for us to try DPL for ourselves and was shocked to discover that we were not going to test it. The thought that I wouldn’t get to test DPL began to eat away at the back of my brain, like a rat gnawing on wiring inside a wall. Who were they to say that I shouldn’t fully test their new motorcycle’s capabilities? I’m a professional. Our readers deserve to know.

A few minutes later, after a photo pass, I found myself at a stop facing an eighth-mile of empty pavement and no Ducati officials in a position to stop me. Now, what would a MOron do in this situation? Yeah…

2016 Ducati XDiavel headlight

The XDiavel S features a stylish LED daytime running light.

If you’ve spent any time at dragraces, you’ve seen racers crank the throttle to the stop, and, when the starting tree shows amber, dump the clutch. As my buddy, former coworker, and erstwhile editor for a dragracing magazine, Peter Jones puts it, in the classes that let you run multistage lock-up clutches or launch control, if you’re modulating your clutch at all, you’ve already lost. The parameters for the launch are programmed into the system in the pits. It was in this spirit that I selected DPL Level 3 for the most intervention (Hey, I’m not totally stupid!), pinned the throttle, and dumped the clutch.

DPL is not that kind of launch control.

Witnesses said, when they heard the engine roar, they turned their heads to see a cloud of tire smoke as the XDiavel’s rear tire instantaneously snapped to the right. Although DPL is not true launch control, I can firmly say that the DTC interceded on my behalf. Upon realizing my mistake, I immediately pulled in the clutch, but without the electronic assist, I would have started the 2016 testing season with a bang. An oops. And, I’m sure, a bunch of explaining. Instead, it was just a stratospheric adrenaline hit and a vigorous finger shaking by the Italian ride captain telling me that a second attempt would not be tolerated. Suitably chastened, I got back in line for another photo pass.

In summary, DPL requires human intervention on launch. Once it detects that the bike is moving, the DTC and wheelie control take over. The real perk that DPL brings to the party is holding the engine rpm at a preset level prior to launch. (For those who care: 8,500 rpm for Level 1 and 8,000 rpm at level 3.) Otherwise, the XDiavel owner is launching their bike the same way we did on our Sixway Street Suberbike Shootout: try not to bog the engine off the line then hold it wide open.

2016 Ducati XDiavel engine left side

With the water pump moved from the alternator cover to the space between the cylinders, the cooling hoses are practically invisible tucked up against the radiator instead of covering the side of the engine.

So, the Testastretta DVT 1262 is claimed to pump out 95 lb-ft and 156 hp (rated at its crankshaft) with transcendent throttle control, but cruiser engines are about more than the production of power. They are also highly-styled objects of worship, and Ducati expended tremendous effort to polish the mill to its jewel-like finish. First, the ugly cooling hardware covering a large part of the engine’s left side was relocated. The water pump moved from its former location on the alternator cover, a location that placed the multiple hoses required for routing the coolant in plain sight. Now, tucked in the center of the L, the water pump is driven by an additional belt and even had its output increased. The various pipes and hoses distributing the coolant have been repositioned, largely out of sight.

The finish of the engine varies based on whether it is a standard or S model XDiavel. The standard receives an all-black engine, while the S has machined highlights breaking up the engine’s glossy black belt covers. Additionally, other select S model pieces, like the peg mounting brackets and the outside edge of the 11 spokes on the alloy wheels, are machined to contrast the black paint. The S also receives a glossy black paint, as opposed to matte black, and a snazzy but understated textured grey and accenting red racing stripes down the center of the tank and front fender. Two other visual details round out the cosmetic features of the S: the LED daytime running light wrapped around the top of the headlight and the gold of the Brembo M50 brake calipers.

2016 Ducati XDiavel swingarm and belt

The XDiavel is the first Ducati to use a belt final drive. Note the removable forged piece connecting the trellis and the cast lower portion of the swingarm. This is required to replace the belt.

Functionally, the standard and the S are the same with the sole exception of the front calipers. The standard sports Brembo M4 32 radial monoblock calipers. Both bikes utilize 320mm semi-floating front discs. When used in anger, both sets of calipers provide plenty of usable performance, but if you want to see E-i-C Duke swoon, get him talking about his love of the M50s. The same holds true of the XDiavel S. But wait, there’s more: All XDiavels benefit from the Cornering ABS provided by the Bosch Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which “dynamically measures pitch and roll angles plus the speed of relative variations in attitude,” allowing the ABS unit to tune its response to the chassis’ current orientation and state of change.

A Ducati by any other name

Although we’ve hinted at the XDiavel’s styling, we haven’t yet turned our full focus on it. The primary design criteria were to embody the cruiser elements of a long, low stance and the almost omnipresent teardrop shaped tank then couple those with a feet-forward riding position. While the original Diavel had a sportbike-like bulbous-topped tank, the XDiavel displays a vestigial hump on its cruiser-styled teardrop. However, the abbreviated seat and pillion share more resemblance to a Monster seat than that of any cruiser. The best way to approach the XD’s relationship to cruiser aesthetics is to look at the broad strokes. The bike’s lines largely taper down towards the back. The engine is displayed in a frame designed to show its beauty and muscularity. The LED headlight is a minimalist unit that flows into the fork.

2016 Ducati XDiavel seat

The seat is quite firm but surprisingly comfortable, though it does lock the rider in one position. If I asked my wife to ride on this pillion, she’d laugh – with murder in her eyes.

If the overarching lines are cruiser-ish, the execution is modern muscle. While this broadening of the cruiser palette to include reinterpretations of classic cruiser lines isn’t unheard of (look at many of the Victorys or the Vulcan S or even the Indian Scout, to a lesser extent), the XDiavel is Ducati performance focus laid over a cruiser profile. And then there are the forward controls that are so often the bane of cruiser cornering.

Ducati’s claim of a 40° lean angle and a relatively low 29.7-in. seat height with forward controls raised some eyebrows, but Ducati seems to have pulled it off. Additionally, the pegs can be moved approximately one inch forward and aft of the standard position to accommodate different leg lengths. Also, the extenders required to lengthen the shifter linkage to suit the varying peg positions are included with the bike. Accessory mid-mount pegs are available for those who want the XD to have the same foot placement as the Diavel. In true cruiser fashion, upper body strength is required for the rider to lift the glutes skyward when large bumps are encountered.

2016 Ducati XDiavel action

At lean angles that would have many cruisers dragging pegs, floorboards, or more, the XDiavel still has cornering clearance in reserve.

Speaking of bumps, the XDiavel’s suspension does a remarkable job of impersonating a sportbike in cruiser’s clothing. The ride is sporty firm which helps with the lean angles the XD can attain. The fully-adjustable inverted fork feels just about perfect for this bike, but the preload and rebound adjustable shock can get harsh over larger bumps (an issue typical of fat and therefore heavy rear wheels and tires –Ed.) – which wouldn’t be a problem if peg location allowed the rider’s legs to be used as auxiliary shock absorbers.

The idea of Ducati making a feet-forward cruiser, on its surface, defies logic. How could a company known for producing technologically advanced, narrowly focused sporting machinery even consider the function-defying riding position? However, what we get in the XDiavel is a modern interpretation of a performance cruiser that corners like a sporty bike and is capable of heart-thumping acceleration followed by hair-on-fire braking.

2016 Ducati XDiavel
+ Highs

  • Torque!
  • Followed by horsepower!
  • 40° of available lean angle
– Sighs

  • Harsh-ish rear suspension
  • Riding position not optimal for handling the Testastretta’s acceleration
  • You call that a pillion?

Cross-breeding Ducati’s vision of the American cruiser with the essential elements of Ducati has produced a bike that, in many ways, thwarts description. The XDiavel has a stunningly beautiful engine that looks much cleaner with the cooling plumbing tucked away from sight. Any other manufacturer would most likely have study-grouped the personality out of the XD. However, Ducati, by pursuing the company goal of building the kind of bikes that it as an entity wants to create, has produced an exciting bike that is one part cruiser to two parts performance machine.

2016 Ducati XDiavel beauty

Will the cruiser market accept the XDiavel? Only time will tell. The XDiavel and the XDiavel S will be available early March 2016 for a MSRP of $19,995 and $22,995, respectively.

2016 Ducati XDiavel and XDiavel S Specifications
XDiavel XDiavel S
XDiavel XDiavel S
MSRP $19,995.00 $22,995.00
Engine Type Ducati Testastretta DVT (Desmodromic Variable Timing), L-Twin, Dual spark, Liquid cooled Ducati Testastretta DVT (Desmodromic Variable Timing), L-Twin, Dual spark, Liquid cooled
Displacement 1262cc 1262cc
Fuel System Bosch fuel injection system, Full ride-by-wire system, 56mm oval throttle bodies Bosch fuel injection system, Full ride-by-wire system, 56mm oval throttle bodies
Valve Train 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder
Horsepower 156 hp @ 9500 rpm (claimed) 156 hp @ 9500 rpm (claimed)
Torque 95.0 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm (claimed) 95.0 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm (claimed)
Transmission 6-Speed 6-Speed
Final Drive Belt Belt
Front Suspension 50mm inverted fork, adjustable for preload, compression, and rebound 50mm inverted fork with DLC treatment, adjustable for preload, compression, and rebound
Rear Suspension Single shock absorber, Adjustable preload and rebound, Remote reservoir, Single sided swingarm, 4.7 in. travel Single shock absorber, Adjustable preload and rebound, Remote reservoir, Single sided swingarm, 4.7 in. travel
Front Brake Dual 320mm semifloating discs, Radial Brembo monobloc 4-piston M4-32 callipers and radial master cylinder, Bosch cornering ABS Dual 320mm semifloating discs, Radial Brembo monobloc 4-piston M-50 callipers and radial master cylinder, Bosch cornering ABS
Rear Brake 265mm disc, 2-piston floating calliper, Bosch cornering ABS 265mm disc, 2-piston floating calliper, Bosch cornering ABS
Front Tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II, 120/70 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso II, 120/70 ZR17
Rear Tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 240/45 ZR17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 240/45 ZR17
Wheelbase 63.6 in. 63.6 in.
Seat Height 29.7 in. 29.7 in.
Weight 545 lb. (claimed) 545 lb. (claimed)
Fuel Capacity 4.75 gal. 4.75 gal.
Available Colors Matte Black Glossy Black
Warranty Two years, unlimited mileage Two years, unlimited mileage

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Ducati Communities

  • George

    Please, where can i find german press release? Thanks, George

  • selarsson

    Right up there with other proud contraptions: V twin built out of a WWII bomber, star 16 cylinder, V12, etc… nothing really practical or meaningful… just a waste of time and resources to build the equivalent of a carnival ride.

    • LS650

      I’m sure the guys who built it for grins and griggles don’t think it was a waste – they probably loved doing it.

  • Born to Ride

    Ducati set out to build the best V-Rod of all time. Mission accomplished, it’s a V-Rod on steroids.

    • Ducati Kid

      BtoR,

      NOT Milwaukee’s best H-D V-Rod, working on it …

      Seriously, one fine Cruiser motorcycle lacking only Floorboards, ‘proper’ Belt Drive Service Access, a worthy Passenger Seat and SUSPENSION!

      Thankfully Cruiser marketplace leading Suspension is nearby as fitted to Bologna’s Multistrada ‘S’, it’s SACHS ‘Sky Hook’ Electronic ware – FIN!

      • Ducati Kid

        BtoR,

        A Harley-Davidson ‘Cruiser’ motorcycle concept featuring Electronic Terrain Following Suspension (E.T.F.S.).

        ‘Cruise today, Tour tomorrow!’

      • Ducati Kid

        BtoR,

        A Harley-Davidson ‘Dark Rod’ motorcycle concept featuring Electronic Terrain Following Suspension (E.T.F.S.).

        ‘Cruise today, Tour tomorrow!’

      • Ducati Kid

        BtoR,

        A Harley-Davidson concept motorcycle featuring Electronic Terrain Following Suspension (E.T.F.S.).

        ‘Cruise today, Tour tomorrow!’

      • Ducati Kid

        BtoR,

        A Kansas City birthed motorcycle (concept) featuring Electronic Terrain Following Suspension (E.T.F.S.), L.E.D. (Day) + H.I.D. (Night) Lighting, ‘Aviation’ style Floorboards, integrated Saddlebags, Passenger Seat and Saddle.

        Permits ‘Cruising today, Touring tomorrow!’ for cost conscious cyclists.

  • Ser Samsquamsh

    Those machines belt covers look exactly like medical scissors or clamps. Pretty neat bike though.

  • Old MOron

    Gee Evans, you covered everything. Fantastic review. And your DPL bravery perpetuates your status as our MOronic hero. Gee, I like the review so much that I’m even swayed to think it’s a pretty cool looking bike! – until you put a rider on it.

    Nothing against you, of course. It’s those feet-forward ergos. I don’t care if pesticides are making men more like women. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/pesticides-may-block-male-hormones/ When a motorcycle rider looks like he (or she!) is sitting on an OB/GYN table, it’s not cool.

  • john phyyt

    A Cruiser with 4.7 in of rear wheel travel ; rising rate and quality damping.! Not a Harley then

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Not a Harley by any means! My Softail puts out 92 ft-lbs at 2500 rpm, not at 5000 rpm. That’s why they have launch control, because the bike will stall if you try to launch at low rpm. That’s what happens on my KTM 1190 R (92 ft-lbs but at 7500 rpm). Harleys are torque monsters. The new Low Rider S produces 115 lb-ft of torque at just 3500 rpm. It would leave the XDiavel in the dust, and for $6295 less.

      • Ratchet

        Bro, your professed love for H-Ds has launched you into a fantasy world. I have personally owned two FLHX SGs (103 and 110 CVO); both are fantastic machines. I have not ridden anything else that propels hardily with the “just-off-idle” throttle dump. However, I have also owned a ZX-10, R1, Triumph Explorer, and an FJ-09. The H-Ds will not touch those bikes in any metric of performance. There is simply no way a new Low Rider will leave this Diavel in the dust. I think you are putting way too much emphasis on the lower revs. Even the FJ screams past 4k rpms in a fraction of a second…plenty of time to overtake a micro burst of 115 ft-lbs.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Two different kinds of bikes. I meant the XDiavel is not a Harley because it has a sport bike engine which produces torque at a much higher rpm. That is the main difference between a cruiser and a sport bike, other than the ergonomics. The Harley is a real cruiser whereas the XDiavel is a cruiser style sport bike. The Harley will launch at low rpms, whereas the XDiavel will be screaming as you said. I know in the end the XDiavel will go faster but that’s not what cruisers are made for. Where are you going to ride at 100mph except at the track?

          • Ratchet

            Yes, I agree the XDiavel and Low Rider S are completely different bikes. Yes, cruisers are also made for a different type of riding than sport bikes. The interesting aspect of the XDiavel is that it merges the sporting character with cruiser ergonomics. Instead of putting a crazy-fast, ill-purposed sport bike engine into an incompetent chassis, Ducati has addressed the suspension, braking, and cornering clearance issues commonly plaguing low slung cruisers. Being ~100lbs. lighter than the Low Rider S, with a competent chassis and a higher revving engine, will make for an interesting alternative for those seeking a high-performance cruiser. I hope Ducati satisfies the niche it’s going after.

          • Craig Hoffman

            Good points.

            The sound of a high performance 90 degree Duc twin is probably the coolest in all of motorcycling too, at least to my ears. It is a great time to be a rider, with many choices.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            That is exactly the problem: it is hard to ride a cruiser like a sport bike. Sport bike enthusiasts hate the feet forward position. Cruiser lovers want a low revving high torque engine. The XDiavel is neither here nor there. Who is going to spend $23,000 on a novelty bike except a few people who want to show off?

      • Born to Ride

        Leave it in the dust? Seriously? I understand you love your Harley, but cmon, lets not be delusional here.

      • DAVID

        HD leave this bike in the dust what are you smoking there KID?? I would put my money on this bike from 0-60 or real world 0-100 O your big girl panties got tight………………

  • Alexander Pityuk

    Have a lot to say here.
    First of all, thx for an amazing article. Or should I call it a thriller? I literally lost my breath when I had read the phase “DPL is not that kind of launch control”. Had to remind myself, that this is just a movie, main hero can’t possibly die, can he?
    Then there is “the the” mistake in the text.
    And lastly, I don’t know what you readers think about XDiavel as a whole, but THIS is just f%&#ng awesome (though it looks that good only from one side):
    http://motorcycle.com.vsassets.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/2016-Ducati-XDiavel-detail-3.jpg

    • Evans Brasfield

      Thanks for pointing out the the mistake. It’s gone now.

  • Daniel Benjamin

    Ridiculous. Absolutely. Looks. Styling. Forward. Feet. Back. It. Change.

  • DickRuble

    I still haven’t seen one Diavel on the street. Granted, I don’t live in a motorcycle Mecca, but from where I sit it sure looks like both Ducati and Triumph are trying too hard to pander to HD’s customer base, It’s not unlike that group of American women singing traditional Bulgarian songs, with no idea of Bulgarian. Native listeners kept asking them in what language they were singing. Their album ain’t gonna be a big seller in Eastern Europe, nor will the XDiavel sell too well in TX. The Southern drawl is too darn hard for Italians.

    • Alexander Pityuk

      Well maybe that is what they are intending to do. Create a niche of its own, where XDiavel doesn’t have competitors. And of course a Ducati’s model won’t be sold by hundreds of thousands anyway, so why not get that small, but guaranteed share of the market?

    • Dimitry Kaplun

      I have been riding my Diavel since 2012 and know another fella who rides one as well. A really good piece of machinery–went to it after my Superbike scared the crap out of me. As surprised as I was with this bike (found it weird and ugly when I first saw it, then when I rode it I was hooked). I am as excited to see how this bike rides.

    • Born to Ride

      I have seen plenty on the road here in southern Cal, my dad owns one and it pulls harder than any other motor vehicle I have had the pleasure to operate. He had a custom saddle made for it at a local upholstery shop and it is truly all day comfortable to ride. The only thing I hate about the bike is that rear tire. Saps all kinds of cornering confidence by feeling like it is going to slide out from under you. Other than that, great motorcycle and a real head turner with all the custom work that has been done. He won a “Ducatisti” award a couple years back when we were at Laguna Seca for the races.

      This new bike I feel will be an orphan as well, too cruiserish for non-cruiser types, and it doesn’t say H-D on the tank so Sayyed and his 1% buddies are more likely to spit on it than swing a leg. Gotta love that trellis swingarm though, that is good ol fashioned S2/4r cool.

  • Craig Hoffman

    Always complaining that cruisers are 65 horsepower dogs with not enough power, and then Ducati builds this thing and I still don’t crave it. I am hopeless.

    Put this bike’s technology into a GT sport tourer, and if I have the money, I am in. Copy another American bike – the Motus – as your sport touring with attitude guide. Such a bike would be completely badass, but then again, I am fickle :)

    • 12er

      Dont ride one. Im not a cruiser fan but loved the Diaval even with my lower back hurting. Granted I cant see owning one, but still want one..

      • Craig Hoffman

        Don’t get me wrong, I would love to take a spin on a Diavel, but like the vacuous hot looking woman with enhanced boobies, such a ride would be a one time thing and not marriage material.

  • Buzz

    I thought “Crash” Bradfield was gonna wad another tester but alas he kept her upright. This is SO much better looking than the original Diavel, I’ll be surprised if they ever sell another one.

    I wish Ducati would do the water hose trick on the Monster which is marred by the giant hose exposure (sounds like the name of my new rock band!)

  • SRMark

    Lotsa torque & HP for a belt drive. And having to split the frame to accommodate it is going a bit far. I have nothing against belt drive but in this case it seems a bit much. My spine also tenses when I look at your images of cornering this bike. It is a purty bike but that cruiser stance is not great for an older back on a bumpy road. But hell, why not? Nice improvement Ducati.

  • Michael McBlane

    Cool bike but the front end looks like an Irish pugilist with a pushed in nose and the rear looks like part of the seat fell off, with the wheel hanging out there. Sometimes too cool for school lacks practicality and/or styling.

    Both fixable with a more extended headlight and a more extended seat. Just my 2 cents.

  • gjw1992

    A direct Diavel vs xDiavel comparison would be useful – how they ride and feel. What separates them beyond the styling, belt and torquier engine of the xDiavel.

  • TheMarvelous1310 .

    See, I was right! All cruisers ever really need to be good bikes is 2 more inches of suspension. I hope Harley gets with the program, between this and the new Victory they could lose… Fourteen riders! FOURTEEN!

  • Randy Pancetalk

    “the XD still doesn’t clear its throat until the tach clears 3,500 rpm. Below that, the engine will accelerate, but it also shudders as the cylinders try to deliver thrust from each power stroke.”

    This is pretty disappointing. My biggest gripe with my ducati monster is it really struggles below 3000 rpm – piston slapping, shaking, ready to stall. It makes driving the thing in the city a real chore.

    I agree with the other guy here who is getting flamed for saying that harley engines are probably way more tractable. They are! They’ll loaf along at 1200 rpm a lot smoother than any ducati engine will run at 3000rpm. I probably won’t own one ever due to the lack of ground clearance and riding position, but I think people really underestimate the mills on harleys.

  • Dale

    Evan, which bikes have you found to have smooth throttle response? Please advise..thanks.

  • zhoubuyou

    Cool, but not the type I like

  • John B.

    The 2016 MOBO awards have lacked controversy. Perhaps, that speaks to the large number of outstanding motorcycles on the market. I’m hoping the XDiavel S wins cruiser of the year and/or motorcycle of the year. It’s my favorite motorcycle to look at, and it doesn’t really have a peer in the cruiser category.