Riding jeans

If the Google machine dropped you directly on this page without seeing the introduction to MO’s Massive Riding Jeans Buyer’s Guide, and you are confused as to what’s going on, you should click here to read the introduction and the full listing of jeans. If you’re the adventurous type who just wants to jump to our individual reviews of 34 pairs of jeans, the Table of Contents below will only give you a direct link to jeans on this page. So, we still recommend that you go to the introduction. There’s a lot of good info to cover.

MO Tested: Massive Riding Jeans Buyer’s Guide – Introduction

REV'IT! Lombard 3

The Lombard 3 is, you guessed it, the third iteration of one of REV’IT!’s staple models of riding denim. The Lombard offers a regular fit that’s not too snug and has a classic five pocket jean style. The blue version has a deep dark hue to it. I’m not a fan of mid-to-high rise riding jeans because you’re usually bent over a bit on a motorcycle, but I do understand the fact that you get more coverage with this fit. That said, this third version comes in with enough stretch that the rise doesn’t bother me much. If you haven’t picked up on the trend right now, stretchy Cordura denim (15 oz in this case) has made its way to lots of motorcycle jeans, and they’re all more comfortable because of it. The Seesmart knee and hip protection is comfortable and flexible. At the knee, the armor is slightly cupped which helps it stay in place better compared to a flat, flexible armor design.

Overall, the Lombard 3 feels a bit more substantial than some of the other jeans here (which helps it gain the AA CE rating) and because of this the Lombard will probably do well into lower temperatures, while they can be somewhat warm when the mercury rises. The denim feels thicker and the armor does as well. If you’re looking for classic/dressy blue jean styling with a mid-to-high rise that offers plenty of protection, the Lombard 3 is a solid choice.

REV'IT! Moto 2

The Moto 2 jeans bring riding denim full circle. While once upon a time riding denim was meant to stealthily mimic your classic Levis, the Moto 2 bucks that adage with moto-inspired styling in a 15 oz stretch Cordura denim chassis. The Moto 2 has a tapered fit with a medium-to-high rise. This jean fits snug, but comfortably so thanks to the stretch, accordion panels above the knees, and pre-curved legs.

In addition, details like the double layered denim at the inner calf hint toward the moto styling. The dark gray of these jeans goes with just about anything and, in my opinion, the moto-styling is always cool, but maybe I’m biased. Like the Lombard, the Moto 2 feels like a thicc, substantial pair of jeans.

REV'IT! Victoria 2 Slim Fit Ladies

The high-waisted fit ensures full coverage, though the double layer may not be the first choice for hotter weather. Reflector patched on the cuffs as well as the pocket are a bonus for those visibility-conscious, and the Cordura denim has no lack of stretch.

The included knee armor is lightweight, breathable and my personal preference for most of my riding gear, pants and jackets alike. Opt for the shorter hem length if you wear taller boots or like to cuff your jeans.

Rokkertech Straight

It’s nice if you’re going to spend this kind of money to get a pair of jeans that looks and feels designer expensive, in addition to being protective. These are designed in Switzerland and sewn in Portugal from what looks like heavyweight, slightly acid-washed denim, but is in fact 50% cotton and 43% ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), which is the military/astronaut stuff that’s claimed to be way stronger than steel; the other 7% is elastic fabric, though these jeans have very little stretch.

For the money, the knee and hip armor really should be included, but at least the heavy-duty stitching and workmanship throughout is top-notch: These jeans feel worthy of the premium price.

Rokkertech Tapered Slim

My medium-sized leg won’t go into some Slim jeans, but Rokker’s Tapered Slims fit perfectly, just snug enough to keep the knee armor in place, hopefully, and for flap-free riding. Unlike some Slim jeans, these don’t make, ahem, mature persons look ridiculous.

The “Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)” miracle fabric in these is a stretchier weave than what’s in the Straight rockers, and gives these jeans a truly custom, comfortable fit you can also walk around or nap on the couch in; the Ghost armor is so thin you barely know it’s there, but it can’t hurt in case of a fall. If you can swing the price tag, these Rokker Tapered Slims are a top pick.

SA1NT Unbreakable Straight

We complained in our review about the lack of available armor in these, which Saint has since addressed with a newer version with pockets for D30 Ghost knee and hip armor. The other thing we complained about was the $400 price tag, which has come down a lot for our non-armored jeans. For hot weather riding, we like the slightly thinner-feeling 69% cotton/23% Dyneema in the Saints, which air flows through nicely; these are the coolest riding jeans I’ve sampled.

Another complaint that’s come through recently is that, although Saint says these are mid-rise waisted jeans, they’re actually low-rise: Not only have I recently been informed they make my butt look strange due to the low pockets, that lower waist might not be optimal should you find yourself sliding along backwards. The rest of the time, though, the 2% Elastene weave makes these super-stretchy and comfy, suitable for lounging as well as riding (stretchy enough that I fit into a 34 waist in these, though I’m closer to 36 inches in circumference).

Scorpion EXO Covert

The fit of the Scorpion EXO Covert jeans is that of traditional, slightly relaxed fit (in the legs) jeans. The knee armor allows the optional armor to be adjusted to fit those with longer or shorter thighs. Two kinds of hip armor are available (SAS-TEC SC-1/07 and SAS-TEC SC-1/KA), and I preferred the thinner, more flexible SC-1/KA. The 32-in. inseam is just about right for my 5’11” frame, hanging just low enough on my boots that they don’t pull up when in any riding position from relaxed to sporty. These jeans are an excellent price point entry, although adding the armor moves the price closer to some of the other jeans. Of the Scorpion jeans tested, these fit me the second best.

Scorpion EXO Covert Pro

The fit of the Scorpion EXO Covert Pro jeans is that of traditional, slightly relaxed fit (in the legs) jeans, though slightly less relaxed that the lower-priced version. The Cordura outer fabric has a smoother feel than typical denin and oozes quality. Strangely, the knee armor pockets are a different shape from the lower-priced version and offer less vertical adjustment. Finally, I have fairly long thighs, and even at their highest position, the knee armor hangs too low and does not cover my knees in a riding position.

Two kinds of hip armor are available (SAS-TEC SC-1/07 and SAS-TEC SC-1/KA), and I preferred the thinner, more flexible SC-1/KA. The 32-in. inseam is just about right for my 5’11” frame, hanging just low enough on my boots that they don’t pull up when in any riding position from relaxed to sporty.

Scorpion EXO Covert Ultra

The fit of the Scorpion EXO Covert Ultra jeans is that of traditional, slightly relaxed fit (in the legs) jeans, while offering the most taper down to the cuff of the Scorpion models tested. The denim/Cordura/Kevlar weave produces an extremely tight twill that looks more like business/dress jeans than technical motorcycle gear. This polish belies the feeling of strength embued by the fabric when pulled on to test its stretch. The single-layered construction allows noticeably more air flow at speed.

Two kinds of hip armor are available (SAS-TEC SC-1/07 and SAS-TEC SC-1/KA), and I preferred the thinner, more flexible SC-1/KA. The inseam measures 32 in. and is just about right for my 5’11” frame, hanging just low enough on my boots that they don’t pull up when in any riding position from relaxed to sporty. Of the Scorpion jeans tested, these fit me the best.



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