Top 10 Hidden-Gem Motorcycles To See At The Barber Museum

Goin' to Barber? You gotta see these

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10. 1938 Crocker

Barber Museum 1938 Crocker

The story of Albert Crocker is an interesting one. In the first half of the 1900s, hundreds of motorcycle companies fought for attention. By the 1920s, many fell by the wayside, but Harley-Davidson, Excelsior-Henderson, and Indian were among the giants also known as the Big Three. Albert Crocker first worked for Thor motorcycles, honing his craft before moving to Indian and becoming a distributor in the Los Angeles area.

From there he decided to take his skills and make his own motorcycles. Speedway bikes were first, but focus shifted to a premium, hand-built luxury motorcycle to challenge the Big Three. This was the result. Powered by a 986cc, 45-degree air-cooled V-Twin, Crockers were able to cruise at high speeds with ease and comfort. Approximately 75 examples were built between 1936 and 1940, of which half are accounted for.

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  • Michael Howard

    It’s a shame the photos are such low-resolution. On my 1024×768 monitor they’re only 1/4 the size of the screen — on my 1920×1080 they’d look like postage stamps. Beautiful and rare bikes deserve high res details.

  • fastfreddie

    Loved the Kawazaki V12!Proper awesomeness:)

  • artist_formally_known_as_cWj

    I’m sure these arenmphotos of lovely bikes, but darn you, motorcycle.com for click baiting. Give us then option to read the entire store on one page, por favor.

    • Kevin Duke

      C’mon, give us the clicks! It’s cheaper than paying a subscription!

  • Dwight Nevins

    Saw this one on the way to Barbers at Motorcyclepedia in Newburgh, along with several others