You’ll remember we, okay I, first rode Indian’s new Scout Sixty last November, where we laid out the differences between it and the regular Scout. Besides a substantial reduction in price to $8,999 and the doing-away with of fifth gear, the Sixty gets, “a simple sleeving down of the bike’s excellent liquid-cooled 60-degree V-Twin, from 1133cc to 999cc (69 to 61 cubic inches)… accomplished with 6mm slimmer bores, down from 99 to 93mm diameter. Stroke remains 73.6mm, meaning this is still an oversquare Twin that doesn’t mind using its 4-valve DOHC heads to rev smack into the 8200-rpm limiter now and then if you so desire. Compression ratio for the smaller engine is a bit higher; up to 11:1 from the 10.7:1 of the 1133cc version.”

Indian-Scout-Sixty-vs-Scout-hp-torque-dyno

Indian claimed 100 crankshaft horsepower for the big Scout; the dyno said 83 at the rear wheel. For the Sixty, Indian said 78 and the dyno reads 69. With cruisers, though, it’s all about the torque. In November I wrote, “the Sixty feels pretty spunky when you give it a big handful. In fact, it doesn’t seem that much slower than the big Scout…” That’s because it only makes a scant 3.1 lb-ft of torque less than the 1133cc engine at low rpm, and runs that close to the bigger engine all the way to almost 6000 rpm. After 6000, the big motor takes off and makes 14 hp more before its 7800-rpm redline.

Hmmm, you’d really expect the bigger engine to make quite a bit more torque via its extra 134cc, but it barely does. Past 6000 rpm, the small engine really tails off, which is another thing you wouldn’t expect given its higher compression and higher redline, and given that both engines inhale through the same 60mm throttle body and the same heads. The Sixty also appears to use the same diameter exhaust headers as the 69-incher.

Can you tell which Scout is which?

Given the nearly identical curves below 6000 rpm, it looks like they even use the same camshafts, which leads us to believe the only difference must be in the ECU tuning: It looks like Indian just dialled back the Sixty’s power output from 6000 revs to its 8200-rpm redline, via giving it less fuel, less ignition advance or a combination of those. Which means it should be pretty easy to modify via a simple reflash. Which, if true, means $8,999 is a better bargain than we thought.

Stay tuned for a comparison of the Scout Sixty vs. Harley-Davidson’s Iron 883 soon.

112415-2016-indian-scout-sixty-engine-cutaway

  • DickRuble

    Had you shown the Sixty had more HP and more torque; that would’ve been news. Not sure what the point of this article was.. you proved that a castrated dog is two balls short.

    • Larry Kahn

      Point was to show the difference. For intellectual curiosity.

      • DickRuble

        I forgot this was a place of intellectual exploration. :)

    • Kenneth

      I’d say it’s news that, while not having more power than the Scout, the Sixty is, evidently, able to produce virtually as much power, given an ECU reflash. So, lacking only an (unneeded) extra overdrive gear, it’s virtually equal to the Scout, for a substantial $2,000 less.

    • Kenneth

      The news is that the Sixty “…is a better bargain than we thought.”

    • spiff

      But the torque is close. Is the juice worth the squeeze to go large?

    • Auphliam

      This is going to sound a bit off the wall, but it proves to me that Polaris, in their wont to cash in on the Indian fervor they created, rushed the pre-production Octane out as the Scout. With a little more refinement, the Sixty would’ve/could’ve/should’ve been THE Scout launch.

      Personally, looking at that graph, I see no value in buying the original Scout. Buy the Sixty, spend a couple bucks on a good 2 into 1 pipe and a Power Commander, and voila. Done and Done.

      • DickRuble

        Looks indeed like a bungled market launch.

      • SJ

        there are quite a few other differences beside the engine such as better wheels, better transmission, more chrome, extra plates, leather versus vinyl.
        To be honest after owning the scout and how much time I spend in fifth gear (which the scout sixty doesn’t have) I’d pay the extra for that alone.

        • MikeinDenver

          From what I read the ratio in 6th in the Scout and 5th on the Sixty are the same so there is no difference. Chrome is for posers. The leather is nicer than vinyl I will give you that.

    • Roger Harper

      U just proved that it is not possible to fix stupid

  • SRMark

    Love both engines. Bodywork not so much.

    • spiff

      And the rider looks goofy if they are to big.

      • Edward Walsh

        just like on any bike if the rider is too big, also pics do not do the Scouts justice, I get tons of compliments wherever I go on my Scout 69.

  • spiff

    I think the 883 is in for more than it can handle.

  • Old MOron

    .
    “How much difference is there really…?”

    https://youtu.be/1RGohIKxc9M?t=9m14s

    Okay, I’m sorry. I just wanted to link that sound byte. So the Sixty is a better bargain than everyone thought. For cruising around, it will serve pretty much just as well as the bigger, more expensive bike. If I recall correctly, that’s about how you called it after your test ride.

  • Ser Samsquamsh

    That’s a strange dip right around 6500 rpm – a power commander seems required.

  • Kevin Dempsey

    Meh… I’ll take the bigger engine, extra gear, and all the chrome that the bigger Scout offers. That’s just how I roll.

  • Craig Hoffman

    JB, you evil subversive man. Pointing out that the factory tuning power limitation on the less expensive bike can likely can be removed with an ECU reflash. I bet you are correct, and I love it. 😉

  • Ian Parkes

    If you want an old-fashioned bike I think this does it well and the frame is pretty trick and thoughtful – so that answers the question why not just buy an old bike? It’s got American heritage credentials and some scarcity value. Better to be an Indian rider than one of the herd.

  • johnbutnotforgotten

    I’ll always prefer a 69 (and it cums with ABS).
    Seriously though, like many, i don’t see the point of two engines that close in size. They have to cost almost the same to produce in non abs form and weigh almost the same so it’s an answer to a question i dont think anyone asked (now a real Scout 45 i can see)