Malcolm Smith sells 3 banned vehicles

Motorsport dealer defies CPSIA

By Motorcycle.Com Staff, Mar. 20, 2009, Photography by Steve Giberson of VitalMX.com
Malcolm Smith Motorsports sold three outlawed youth vehicles to protest the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act which prohibits the sale of youth motorcycles and ATVs because of their lead content levels.

The Riverside, Calif. multi-line dealership sold two KTM 65SX Motocross bikes and a Can-Am quad in defiance of the CPSIA in the Kids Love 2 Ride protest, March 19.

“Motorcycling has always been a family sport and the new act prohibits this from continuing – we need to work together now to put an end to the ban on minicycles,” says Todd Baldwin, general sales manager for Malcolm Smith Motorsports.

Owner Malcolm Smith, a member of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, off-road racing champion and star of the film “On Any Sunday” organized the protest, inviting industry celebrities such as Supercross icon Jeremy McGrath, Hall of Fame off-road racer Scot Harden.

Malcolm Smith poses with a child. The shirt reads: "I promise not eat it, I just want to ride it!"
Designer Troy Lee with his son and his brand new KTM 65SX.

Multiple-time AMA National Motocross, Supercross and Supermoto champion Jeff Ward purchased one of the two KTM 65SX bikes for his son Aryton. Motorsport helmet designer Troy Lee purchased the other bike for his nine-year-old son. Glen Helen Raceway owner Bud Feldkamp purchased the Can-Am quad for his grandson.

“On behalf of KTM North America I am extending our deepest gratitude to Malcolm and his staff for their proactive approach to the CPSIA issue,” says Jon-Erik Burleson, KTM president. “The more people involved and attention generated on this issue will ensure a timely resolution to the matter at hand.”

The Kids Love 2 Ride protest drew many supporters and industry notables, and attracted the attention of the mainstream media.

“I’ve been paying attention to all the rules and regulations, giving them some time to do something about it,” Smith told USA Today. “They have no idea what this is doing to small businesses.”

Should Smith be charged for violating the CPSIA, he faces a maximum civil penalty of $100,000 for each sale and criminal penalties of up to five years imprisonment.