Brave New World is the title of a 1932 novel by Aldous Huxley with a dystopian view of a hypothetical future society that is disoriented by new ways of being. This has some parallels to the motorcycle publishing industry, especially in the medium of printed magazines.

The Bonnier Motorcycle Group is the current juggernaut among motorcycle-related publications, as it manages a large majority of popular national moto magazines in America. Titles like Motorcyclist, Cycle World, Hot Bike, Sport Rider and Dirt Rider, among others, fall under the extensive Bonnier umbrella since 2011.

And yet, not all is well at the BMG. In 2017, Motorcyclist converted to a publishing schedule of just six issues a year, while Cycle World reduced its monthly output to 10 times a year. Meanwhile, Sport Rider and Dirt Rider magazines were axed entirely.

Things must be getting worse over at Bonnier. We learned this week that CW, which has been for years the world’s most widely circulated motorcycle magazine, will now be publishing just four issues a year. Additionally, Hot Bike was melded with Baggers to serve the American custom and V-Twin touring audiences with a single publication.

“As we enter a new and exciting year within the motorcycle industry, it is imperative to recognize that the footprint of all media, including that within the motorcycle sector, is encountering significant change,” reads a BMG statement released this week.

“Among these refinements, print media is witnessing the most significant of changes. Consumers continue to enjoy traditional media, but advertising demand in all magazines has steadily decreased. However, it has been proven that Millenials, surprisingly, enjoy the printed product, especially when the magazine is of high-quality, artistic and experiential.”

The BMG also notes that most people now consume digital content across many platforms, stating it “is refining its print content to position it more toward the younger, millennial audience with higher quality products.”

“We have done extensive research with our audience about their media consumption preferences,” said Bonnier Motorcycle Group SVP/Managing Director, Andy Leisner. “While advertisers seek more direct-response ad solutions that we deliver through our digital products, we still have a unique audience of affluent baby boomers plus millennials that value culture-rich, high-quality content delivered in good print magazines. Our focus groups have told us that they will pay more for a beautiful, quality product, so we are redesigning our print brands to deliver a great reading experience that they will covet and value.”

To quote another author: Strange days indeed…

  • spiff

    That’s like me looking in the mirror and stating how good I look with lipstick on, self indulging.

    Print is now a niche.

  • Gruf Rude

    Sound of whistling, as headstones hove into view . . .

  • Alaskan18724

    I like print. I still subscribe to Motorcyclist, Cycle World, Rider, and Roadrunner. The net is faster and a lot of fun, but it’s still glossy pictures on good paper that grab me and send me scrambling for my checkbook. Harley is smart to put a handsome brochure in my hand. Ducati, Triumph, BMW, and—heck—Indian dealers all tell me to download it. Well, I download all of them. But I digest and dogear printed magazines and brochures.

    • Sallie

      G-o-ogle is p-a-ying $97 per hour,with weekly payou-t-s.Y-o-u can also avail this.On tuesday I got a brand new Land Rover Range R-o-ver from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I ha-v-e ever done .. It sou-n-ds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you do-n-’t check it!kx563i:➪➪➪ http://GoogleDailyConsumerDigitalJobsFromHomeJobs/get/hourly ♥o♥s♥v♥♥♥m♥♥♥e♥♥♥n♥♥♥o♥♥h♥♥♥p♥♥♥z♥l♥♥w♥♥♥u♥♥♥v♥♥♥b♥♥y♥♥z♥y♥♥b♥♥v♥♥v♥♥e♥♥n♥♥♥a♥♥g:::::!cx203u:lhuh

      • Jon Jones

        SHADDUP!

        • Sayyed Bashir

          You do know that you are talking to a adbot? Just down vote it and MO will take care of it.

          • Jon Jones

            It’s more fun this way.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Notice how all these adbots are using the same picture but with different names: Barbara, Irma, Jennifer.

          • Jon Jones

            And they never respond to my requests for “dates”!

          • Rick Soloway

            Oh, triplets. Yum.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Another thing you can do is click on their name, then click on the three dots next to their name at the top of their profile and click “Block User”. You will never see any of their posts again. Makes the comment section much cleaner.

          • Campi the Bat

            How else is he to get those misogynistic “jokes” and comments out of his system?

    • Junker

      Harley did have the marketing thing figured out. It’s kind of amazing how brochures can influence some of us. Our family had a need for an economy car a few years ago. I got a Mazda 3 although, honestly, I felt at the time I should probably get a Civic. And then Mazda started sending me their owner magazine every few months. I started thinking…hmmm, a Miata would be cool, wish they would make an RX9…lol…when I hadn’t given Mazda much of a thought in years. The 3 was just the right price at the right time…and I didn’t have to drive it so it didn’t matter..bwahaha.

      During my brief experience with HD I was also impressed they would give you a huge accessories catalog every year, and their clothing mailers were nice, too. I wasn’t into all that, but I could see that it would help business.

  • Larry Kahn

    You don’t get many pages for the cover price, maybe include a few sheets of TP for readers convenience would help sales…

  • Jon Jones

    Sad news but inevitable.

  • Jim Logan

    Cycle, Cycle Guide, Motorcycle Sport Quarterly, just a couple of departed magazines. I used to get Cycle News in the mail every week until it stopped printing. It seems like Kevin Cameron has been single-handedly been trying to save Cycle World. Last month they ran an article about a $65,000 truck. Come on guys, I thought you were a motorcycle magazine. All I could think of was all of the motorcycles $65,000 would buy. Maybe they will never be the same now that Peter Egan has retired.

    I stopped reading Motorcyclist when Brian Catterson took over. I did not like his editorial bent. Sometime later I picked up a copy at the airport and found Marc Cook had taken over. Much better choice to run a magazine. It looks like Bonnier ran him off. The official word from one of their issues was Zack Courts and Ari Henning were going to replace him. I like those guys, but apparently Bonnier doesn’t. It looks like they have been demoted after only a few issues.

    I read Roadrunner. I hope they are doing better. I also read Motorcycle Consumer News. They too have recently gone through reorganization. The book is still out on that one.

    No offense intended to Motorcycle.Com, you guys run an excellent on-line publication, but I still prefer print.

    • gjw1992

      Then Bonnier need to get their online strategy better in gear – Zack and Ari do a great job with Motorcyclist’s youtube offerings and guess that’s resented somewhere in Bonnier.

      Print can work – here in the UK the weekly paper mcn seems to have improved (or I appreciate it more…) and now make sure I read the monthly Ride and Bike mags when not long ago was on the verge of cancelling cheap offer subs. Given there’s a far wider range of fun bikes to write about nowadays compared to the (non-HD) super/litre sport bike focus of 15 years ago, there’s also a lot more to write about that people might want to read and gently graze rather than browse.

  • Junker

    That’s too bad. They’re practically giving away subscriptions, too. I think I got 2 years of Rider, Cycle World, and Motorcyclist for under $30 TOTAL about a year and a half ago. Nevertheless, this summer when they all expire I may only keep Rider, if any. Cycle World has got so thin it takes less than 30 mins to read; and although I found the new Motorcyclist to be refreshing at first, I’m now not even reading it really–I think they went for a younger audience, but I do wish them luck. Didnt even know about the CW cutback.

    Funny that I would keep Rider since when I first got it, it was the one I was sure I would not keep. I found their tour articles to be super annoying–an article that says go north on 10, turn south on 12, go east on 14…even with a tiny map 3 pages back. Seems like there would be a better way to execute the concept. Yeah, internet, I know, but even in print there is bound to be a better way.

    After having Rider a couple years, though, I find they probably are targeted more to my age, demographic, something… They seem more open-minded about bikes, less enamoured of wheelies as the most important characteristic of a bike, less California-centric, not biased toward exotic euros,…

    By the way, MO suffers some of those same ‘faults’. You’ve got the immediacy of the internet and comments sections on your side, but it’s hard to be too in love when you go on about wheelies like you’re 12, you can bet all your bitcoin that an Aprillia (whatever) is going to win the competition, or when your lane-splitting algorithm kicks out its mandatory weekly article. All you CA magazine folks may find it shocking, but you may want want to lookup just how many Aprillia dealers there are in, say, Tennesse. Tip: if you came up with 1, you are basically wrong. That dealer will order you one, and they might have one that someone walked away from their deposit, but the real answer is ZERO.

    • Happy to accommodate you as soon as Aprilia stops making the best and most engaging bikes in the Superbike and Supernaked category. P.S. Aprilias only started winning when they started being the best products… 2002 for the Tuono, much more recently for the RSV4. Yes, their dealerships generally suck and their availability is spotty at best…. they’re still worth it.

      • spiff

        I used to drive 4 to 5 hours for my Aprilia to be worked on. No regrets, he is a great mechanic, and I loved that bike. 🙂

      • Junker

        Yeah, there’s no other way to do comparisons. Like how they always set Mustangs against Ferraris 😉 Just no other way to do it!

        For the record I have a KTM right now. It is an amazing piece of engineering, but before the warranty is up there will be a new Japanese bike (or two) in my garage. I guess I can say I agree the Euros are great for an afternoon or two. Just a little more difficult to live with…

        • Jon Jones

          Good call.

        • Jason

          Aprilias, Ducatis, and other Euro bikes aren’t much more expensive than Japanese bikes today. Certainly not a Mustang vs Ferrari difference in price.

          • Lewis

            They aren’t much more for minor maintenance, but wait until you have a major service or repair. Just been my experience over the years.

          • Jon Jones

            True.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            My KTM dealer has been very reasonable and accommodating so far. No complaints. If you want to have a certain bike, you do whatever is needed to have it.

          • Lewis

            I hear you. I owned 2 Ducatis in the 90’s and parts not on hand took weeks to arrive from Italy and were quite expensive. Not fun to have a $13K bike (very expensive for 1999) sitting waiting for a $200 part from Italy for a few weeks during riding season. Still loved that 748, but I then decided to sell it. Anyway, the major service would have been due the next season.

          • Eric

            I had even worse experiences with my ’97 monster. I have no desire to ever deal with that much brain damage ever again.

      • Lewis

        Wait until you get the bill for the valve adjustment on the V4. Aprilia factory service standard is 8 hours for just the inspection and then goes up with the need for shims. Do the math on that one. Killed any desire I had for the Tuono. Still very attractive, but not worth it, unless you have piles of money and free time.

        • Jon Jones

          I like it when the (insane) cost of maintenance is posted with bike tests and shootouts. Good stuff to know up front.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          You gotta pay for what you love, no matter the price.

        • Jason

          OK, that is one point of data. How many hours are required for a Kawasaki ZX-10R, Yamaha R1, BMW S1000RR? Is 8 hours 3X more, 2X more, 50% more, the same?

          • Lewis

            That would be another research project, but I can assure you I am not buying any bike that takes 8 hours for a valve inspection, again unless I am rich enough to wipe with $20 bills. But as someone mentioned below, gotta pay to play if you love it enough.

          • Jason

            So then you don’t actually know that maintenance cost for an Aprilia are more than for a similar Japanese superbike.

          • Lewis

            Well, last Japanese superbike I had was a 98 R1 which had a 26,600 mile adjustment interval (5 valve). Did not own it long enough. My 89 FZR 600 took less than an hour for inspection but who knows what the manual standard is. All I can tell you is I have never heard of a valve inspection on a Japanese bike running close to a cool $1000 and I have had several motorcycle dealers and parts houses as clients (including one of the top 2 Aprilia dealers in the US, which also sells Suzuki). A quick search revealed a 15000 mile service on a 2017 ZX10 including the valve inspection was $275. Seems my experience was on point and the world order regarding maintenance cost is pretty much unchanged from the 90’s.

          • Jason

            Interesting. This is what I found with the help of our good friend google:

            I had mine done a few weeks ago for my 10R. Here’s what my Invoice says.

            What I had done:
            – New front & rear tire (Dunlop Quallies)
            – Lube all cables
            – Valve adjustment
            – New air filter
            – New spark plugs
            – Replace brake fluid
            – Lube steering stem bearings
            – Everything else on the 15k maintenance checklist

            Labor was $80/hr

            Total Parts: $446.08
            Total Labor: $584.00
            Other: $23.36

            Grand Total w/ Tax: $1,111.38

            The tires are likely $500 of that but $600 is still more double the $275 you found.

          • Lewis

            I am sure you will find a range, I don’t even know what top line liter bike tires plus mounting etc run these days (my 89 Yammy runs a 130 rear) Shops in my neck of the woods are about $100-$110 an hour. Somewhat less for private entrepreneurs. The $275 was found on a Kwak forum on the top result for my query. I encourage you to dig around on the V4 Aprilia. I was in love with an 1100 Factory Tuono enough to ignore the ergos, but I dove deep on the maintenance aspect and that was the end of that lust affair. The $64,000 question is what would that type of service run on a V4 Aprilia? From what I found, it will be on the naughty side of $1000 without the tires.

          • I honestly believe it’s worth an extra grand every couple of years to ride an RSV4 or Tuono Factory. I’m not arguing but I do have thousands of miles on them on and off track and would pay whatever they asked… with a smile on my face.

          • Lewis

            No argument here, as long as the extra money provides something worthwhile to you.

          • Jason

            If I was in the market for a $17,000 superbike, spending an extra $500 – $1000 every 2-3 years on maintenance wouldn’t even factor into the equation.

            Distance to a good service shop would be a bigger issue for me.

          • Lewis

            Completely understandable. I am not at all against the Euro-bikes, I just no longer have the disposable income for the ownership experience. I know what you mean by having to travel for service. Last euro I had was a Husky 650 and the shop was 84 miles away. Local Aprilia dealer is about 85 miles.

      • Prakasit

        The way I see it, is that the Japanese Big Four started playing it safe years back. Ok, may be Yamaha doesn’t fall in that category. Now that Aprilia, Ducati and KTM are innovating faster and trying to out do each other. They deserve to be in the limelight. I stopped hoping for Honda to come up with something really worthy of attention long ago. One can only be teased with a V4 superbike by Big Red so many times.
        Also, like someone else here says, Aprilia is not that much more of a premium over any of them.

      • Joe Smith

        Do you have a running Aprilia? If you do you’ll be the only person I know with one that hasn’t suffered a catastrophic failure.

    • Alaskan18724

      Two words. Clem Salvadori.

      • Angela

        Goog-l-e is pay-i-ng $97 per hour,with we-e-kly payouts.You can also a-v-ail this.On tuesd-a-y I got a brand new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfort-a-ble job I have ever done .. It so-u-nds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t che-c-k it!rw101k:➽➽➽ http://GoogleOnlineDealsOpportunity/earn/hourly ♥f♥♥k♥♥♥r♥♥♥m♥♥♥h♥♥♥z♥♥q♥v♥♥♥g♥u♥♥♥w♥s♥g♥o♥i♥i♥♥♥a♥♥t♥♥q♥♥v♥o♥♥♥u♥♥♥l♥♥e♥f:::::!ge491j:lhuhu

      • Jim L

        Great writer too.

    • Strat

      If it’s interesting, I’ll keep subscribing. One of the best features in CW or Motorcyclist, I can’t recall which, is “Me and My Bike.” It’s only one page, but I always find it interesting.

  • Starmag

    Aiming for affluent Millennials? I think I’ll be passing on teh “Touring for avocado toast” and ” Which maintenance apps to HODL and which to FODL” articles even if a latter-day Egan arrives to regale me with humorous tales of singeing his beard while welding or removing it from his bikes chain even if the pics are good.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      I am probably not a affluent millennial because I don’t know what HODL and FODL means. Ah! Good old internet to the rescue: HODL = Hold On for Dear Life. FODL = Falling Off a Dinosaur Laughing. Thank you! Now I feel better. Actually FOLD seems to be an app you use to pay for your coffee at Starbucks using bitcoins.

      • 安藤龍

        I didn’t know what either of those meant either lol (born in ’85)

  • Wishes don’t do much, but I wish this was not happening. When it happened with computer magazines in the early 2000’s, someone described many of the changes taking place as “like re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic.”

    OTOH, since print cannot compete with web-only pubs such as MO, I think the way, or at least A way for them to succeed, is to publish on higher quality paper with top photography and higher-altitude price ranges. The Robb Report is still thriving as a general luxe-ish pub and I’ll bet their table life is impressive. It’s hard to throw out a magazine that feels good to the touch and has a wide content range within its niche.

    Advertisers don’t seem to have a problem supporting upscale mags, so that may be the best current route. Kinda too bad because it argues higher prices, but if print is going to stay valid it needs sufficient, compelling editorial. Print books with 4 to 6 articles aren’t going to exist unless they’re unsubsidized by other media or other business.

    It would be interesting to see the metrics on Millennials with the interest and discretionary funds to support moto print pubs.

    … going on much too long, but…

    Chasing the assumption that Millennials are all about experiences, moto experiences aren’t limited to touring, bar cruising, or sportbike professional racing.

    I wonder if lifestyle pieces on flat track (an obvious winner), scrambling, other desert riding, vintage obsessions of various sorts, collecting and investing (vintage moto auctions are setting records), custom moto-design featuring international custom studio/shops, the whole moto tattoo tie-in, moto-charity tie-ins (the sneakiest argument: “But honey, I need a bike so I can go on the poker runs to raise money for …. and to collect toys for kids at Christmas.” Anyone here used that with success?) Even the scooter craze – Millennials think Europe is cool, right? They have humongous scooter events.

    There are so many fascinating, quirky, historic, and futuristic special interests and lifestyles associated with motorcycling, seems to me a well-funded, extremely high quality print book that could afford a year or two to grow could make a difference in the motorcycle industry and even make good buck itself in time.

    Just sayin’.

    Tell me I’m crazy, Kevin.

    • Kevin Duke

      Not I, Bruce, I think that’s the best strategy to move forward. I’m curious how BMG’s websites will be stocked with fresh pieces while the releases of their print books lingers.

      • Jon Jones

        Their websites are a trainwreck of pop-ups, banners, and crazy-loud auto-play videos as I’m sure you’re aware.

        I’ll grudgingly deal with it to read Kevin Cameron pieces, but I lose patience and eject soon after. And the comment section isn’t Disqus, but rather some crappy imitation.

        • DickRuble

          I stopped going to those sites for the very reasons you point out. Not worth my time and aggravation.

    • Junker

      I have a feeling “lifestyle” is another part of the problem. Motorcyclists still have certain image(s) in the US, and those exclude a huge part of the population imho. Not everybody is an HD badass social security recipient or an urban human tattoo canvas. I think motorcycling would benefit from less “lifestyle” and more “normal”. Remember the “you meet the nicest people on a Honda” thing? If somebody says I’m a boater, or I’m an RVer, or whatever, it doesn’t say much about them. You don’t form much of an image of them without knowing more. But when someone says they are into bikes, people already have images in their heads…

      • Sayyed Bashir

        And how are you going to change that? Motorcycling’s image is not just of the badass Harley riders (not all of whom are on Social Security, otherwise they couldn’t afford their $30,000 beasts) but also of the crotch rocket racers who end up too often on the bottom half of the front page. The image the BMW adventure crowd projects is that of the wealthy or well-to-do motorcyclist. Dirt riders project a healthy and fit lifestyle. Lots of happy couples tour long distances on Gold Wings, Ultra Glides and K1600s. So the image of motorcyclists is only limited by your own imagination and prejudices.

        • Junker

          The BMW image is only known to other motorcyclists. Everyone else thinks, what the fuck is that thing parked at Starbucks and why is he dressed like an astronaut who really, really likes pockets.

          • Jon Jones

            Pretty good!

          • Rick Soloway

            Quite humorous!!

          • Jeff S. Wiebe

            “dressed like an astronaut who really, really likes pockets”. heehee

    • DickRuble

      You are crazy.. well.. rather clueless.. but since you asked I felt I should oblige and call you crazy. You clearly do not understand that there is no parallel to be drawn between the Robb Report and a motorcycle magazine. You could have a motorcycle Rob Report, but that would not address the motorcyclist audience. It would be a coffee table publication for a tiny minority of wealthy wankers.

    • BDan75

      I’m getting old, so grain of salt…but these days I find all the hipster-oriented content (e.g., scrambling, cafe racers, tattoos, spiritual awakenings, etc.) increasingly tiresome. It seemed fresh five years ago, but now it feels kinda played-out. Anyway, I could never get past the feeling that for most of those people the bike was just a lifestyle prop.

  • Rob

    This might be a valid path for the near future, but if they think they can successfully “target millennials” when they write their press releases like that, I’ll take the short position, thanks.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      They are writing their press releases for their advertisers so at least some of them still believe them and give them their money. They could care less about millennials.

  • SRMark

    We boomers are leaving and taking our ball with us.

    • Mad4TheCrest

      I don’t see that. I haven’t left nor have nearly all of my boomer riding friends. All of our ‘balls’ are still in play. It feels more like the rules of the game are being change around us.

      • SRMark

        I mean dropping off the planet.

        • Mad4TheCrest

          Yikes! Don’t remind me. I’ll be hanging on as long as I can safely sit a two-wheeler. After that look for me on one of those mobility scooters with added VR46 decal.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            After the two-wheeler comes the trike. Then the turbo mobility scooter. You’ll have to earn that VR46 sticker.

          • Gruf Rude

            Hard to afford the trike on Social Security payments, what with the cost of supplemental Medigap insurance and the really expensive hearing aides necessitated by 50+ years of wind noise . . .

  • Jason

    I’m a millenia (40) and do not read any publication in print form. I still like magazines, but do not send me a paper magazine in the mail. I expect a digital magazine that I can read on my iPad. One specifically formatted for digital reading not just a PDF of the print magazine. I expect to click on a picture and see it full screen. I can have hundreds of books and magazine in the palm of my hand instead of wall-to-wall bookshelves.

    Fewer issues and better paper is just postponing the end.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      I have lots of great books and magazines laying around that I have never even cracked open. Too impatient for the latest information. Anything printed is already old news. Also one can instantly research anything that comes into one’s mind while reading articles online. The only time I will ever read a book or magazine is while flying, or (God forbid) in a hospital bed.

      • DickRuble

        Darn, I was about to recommend a book on logic for you.. Never mind.

        • Max Wellian

          Nobody has the attention span it takes to read one anymore. Don’t guess it matters all that much. What’s there to know? They drive themselves now and you need a dealership computer to do the maintenance. Just sit down and enjoy whizzing between the parked car mirrors at 15 mph with 160 hp under the fairing cooking your thighs.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            That’s a good description. But once you get out of town you are free to cool down that 160 hp cooking your thighs. Hopefully whizzing between parked car mirrors is not the only riding you do.

  • Mad4TheCrest

    When you want or need immediate information or are just craving your bike ‘fix’, nothing beats the web. When you want something substantive and immersive that also has a reasonable chance of lasting over the years for future re-enjoyment, print still works best. Heck, if you keep them out of the wet, print magazines can be around longer than you will – your kids can enjoy them. And motorcyclists generally don’t fall out of love with older bikes and often get pleasure out of re-reading decades old mags. Try finding a decades old MO article in about 30 years. CW’s effort to stay alive with quarterly print issues while satisfying the more immediate needs of it’s audience with web content is worth a try. Only time and the quality of its content will tell.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      I will only read their online articles if they start using Disqus. There is no point in reading articles you can’t discuss with other commenters. Also their advertising and “sponsored content” is horrendous. They are shooting themseves in the foot.

      • Jason

        Me too. Several websites I used to read switched to Facebook comments. The first thing I noticed was that participation in the comment section declined tremendously.

        • Strat

          Didn’t they do that to stop all the garbage that was being spouted? The clever idiots with their constant “U mad bro?” They figured putting a name on the comments might keep them in line somewhat. I’m not on facebook and am not going to be.

          • Jason

            Maybe. Maybe Facebook comments pay better somehow.

            Doesn’t matter to me, I don’t use Facebook comments. Disqus is just way more convenient with comments from all the sites I visit in one place.

          • therr850

            Maybe unrelated;
            Regarding “maybe facebook pays better” it is kind of like Coke taking over the soft drink selections at the fast food and cafes. They offer cheaper buy in prices so the food stores can make a couple pennies more per meal than Pepsi. DON’T LIKE COKE! We have started carrying our own drinks in with us. When they tell us we can’t is when they lose a couple customers.

  • Alaskan18724

    I feel sorry for the youth of America. Ahh, the things I learned reading (or at least looking at) magazines in Harry Hamm’s barber shop in Pensacola in the 70s….

  • Lewis

    I stopped getting the mainstream auto and cycle magazines a long time ago. Far too much advertising for too little content. I still get high quality print mags in the mail such as Motorcycle Classics and Excellence. I do buy Brit publications from Barnes and Noble once in a while, especially Practical Sports Bikes. I am wondering if CW can go higher quality with the quarterly format.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      That’s the plan.

  • Donnie

    I have saved all of my motorcycle magazines starting way back in the early 70’s and there is so much more content in the old magazines compared to what is available now.
    Hell, it took Kevin Cameron 3 pages to clear his throat before he started to really get into the article’s point.
    Some of the “throw away” articles in the back of the book were twice as long as what we get now. I can now read “Cycle World” in one good bathroom session.
    I also remember when there were pictures of the motorcycles from every side, now you have to guess what the left side looks like!

    • Jon Jones

      I miss the depth of the old magazines, also. I learned so much from them as a kid.

      And good line about Kevin Cameron.

      • DickRuble

        Content AND style were vastly superior thirty+ years ago. I get real pleasure reeding articles written back then; they’re meaningul and well written…

    • Sayyed Bashir

      The left side is usually ugly (especially on Ducatis). No need to see it.

      • Rita

        Go-o-gle is paying 97$ pe-r- hour,with wee-k-ly payouts.You can also ava-i-l this.O-n tuesday I got a brand new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this l-a-st four weeks..wi-t-h-out any doubt it’s the most-c-o-mfortable job I have ever done .. It sou-n-ds unbelievab-l-e but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it!sw672d:↛↛↛ http://GoogleOnlineEasyEnergyWorkFromHome/online/easytasks ♥u♥♥♥r♥d♥♥♥s♥♥♥h♥♥d♥m♥d♥i♥♥y♥♥♥h♥♥♥o♥♥♥c♥x♥l♥u♥m♥♥h♥♥♥y♥♥a♥♥♥n♥y♥♥n♥♥t♥♥♥w:::::!kx631u:lweiy

        • Jon Jones

          I Jennifer has the hots for you, Sayyed!

          • She’s going to let Sayyed ride in her Range Rover…

    • Jim L

      Kevin Cameron is a gift. I don’t think there’ll be another tech writer like him or as good. This collapse of publishing has been a long time coming though. We’ve seen a lot of writers disappear. Art Friedman, Jamie Elvidge, Mark Zimmerman, Andrew Cherney, Tim Carrithers and a bunch of others from CW and Cycle. It’s not that there isn’t any writing talent today, but the space available to do it is shrinking and the competition isn’t for who’s best, but who will do a good enough job the cheapest.

      • Kevin Duke

        🙁

        • Jim L

          I’m sorry Kevin.

  • Jon Jones

    One huge advantage web-based moto-sites have over print is right here: The comments section. I love this. I don’t view many sites that don’t have commenting. This Disqus format is by far the best. I don’t like Facebook-based comment sections at all. A bit of anonymity is good for those of us who work in the industry and want to spill the beans about retarded policies, politics, and screw-ups.

    • Jason

      Same here. I current work in the auto industry No way I’m talking about upcoming products or how my CEO lied to Congress using my real name.

  • Old MOron

    If Motorcycle Online were Motorcycle In Print, I’d get a subscription.

  • mugwump

    Motorcycle Consumer News, the one in the US.

  • lennon2017

    The decline in print trade journals is really no surprise. Anyone interested in seeing and reading about new bikes and gear and stuff are more into the immediacy that the Web offers. It’s strange that they’ve made this announcement without many things to show for their “new and exciting frontiers” spiel. Hat’s off to Henning and Courts for trying to shake up the old ways with more video and adventures, but the realisation that that stuff takes time and mucho money to do in an interesting and subscription-worthy way, especially paid sub, is probably dawning fast and they’re in a bind. They have to try to make those 6 issues seem precient and evergreen at the same time. I hate to say it, but so much of the fall of moto mags is probably attributable to the rise of motovloggers and nichy productions like Adventure Rider Radio and its ARR Raw supplement. There don’t have to me more than a handful of publications covering product releases and doing quick analyses, and then for the cultural, personality-driven we-love-bikes-let’s-love-bikes-through-YouTube nuggets, GoPro folk do that pretty well without having to think too hard about putting their thoughts into palatable text. I doubt stories, real stories, with depth, essayistic, serialized, can save them in the long run, but that is the only differentiating factor that could make a print object valuable to people who bat an eye at $10-15 annual outlays for staplepaper and then debate with themselves and through user feedback the merits of gauntlet gloves under or over $100-200. Maybe it’s the bizarre relicry of subbing and then waiting up to or more than two months for their first issue to show that jades people out, especially in a 2-day shipping world. And when they have a out like MO, or MCN, or Visordown, or or or or, can’t do nothing but shrug and say how about that Bitcoin. A forward thinker with a two-wheeled interest could fund fully-owned long-term fleets for good-salaried people to devote themselves seriously to entertaining and educating readers and viewers who often have to settle for rehashed press copy and articles low on sugar, spice and nutrition.

    • therr850

      You lost me with the first sentence. I don’t like on line. I am willing to wait two months for the print version because I don’t like the headaches I get from reading these electronic devices. I guess my advantage with the declining print on paper media is I’m 71 and probably won’t be riding as much in ten or twelve years even if I am still breathing.

  • TC

    So, Playboy, Penthouse, and Hustler have all fallen on hard times, so to speak, and now the Motorcycle magazines are dying off? Coincidence? Sheez, it’s like the graybeards don’t get laid or ride their bikes anymore.

  • allworld

    I subscribe to 5 moto magazines, I only keep 2 of them, one because it is high end and with great touring information, the other because it’s has no advertising and has useful information cover to cover. I am rethinking buying any printed materials.
    For me personally I don’t see a future in printed materials, mostly for environmental reasons. Consider China is no longer excepting recyclable materials as of Jan.1st, the piles of paper and plastic are piling up across North America and Europe. It was time to deal with this problem years ago.
    Perhaps publishers and advertisers should build recycling plants

  • Joe Gresh

    Look on the bright side: coffee table sales are going through the roof.

  • Steve Wilner

    Let’s see. Dropped Motorcyclist after their reboot as a sort of Robb Report for motorcycles. Lots of white space, tiny unreadable type, senseless editorial, and lots of 2-page tobacco ads. Still pay for CW but digital only. Still pay for Rider in print and enjoy it, along with RoadRunner in print (includes digital copies). Finally, BMW Magazine in print plus separate-fee digital, though this is a specialized book.

  • Buzz Kanter

    Bonnier is now suffering from a long term flawed business strategy. And their magazines are now paying the price. Print is NOT dead, but marginal magazines are. American Iron Magazine is still published every 4 weeks (13 issues a year) and we have been steadily growing the frequency of our all tech and Do It Yourself American Iron Garage to 6 issues a year. Publication Darwinism at work. Survival of the fittest – no matter how anyone spins it.

  • Steve

    Motorcyclist’s version of “high quality” has so far ment killing most content from their magazine, making the print smaller and margins bigger. The mag is still less than half the physical thickness of the magazine whos subsciption i replaced it with which is also printed 6 times a year (adventure bike rider). Not to mention killing a once passablely decent website and replacing it with an ad space (it would appear that millennials and baby boomers no longer care about the little event called eicma as they have not covered it online that i can see).

  • KevinM044

    I gave up on CW when they hired that smug pretentious jerk who used to write for some other sites. I could never stand his attitude nor his style of writing. When I saw him in print, I let my subscription run out. I really don’t need some skinny lumberjack looking fool telling me how cool some kid is for doing wheelies around some canyon in California.

    As far as Bonnier’s websites, I gave up on them awhile back as well. All the pop-ups, the advertising, the instant-playing commercials, sponsored content with the same titles… UGH! The pages would take forever to load. I’m surprised they’re not making enough from online advertising alone to pay for twice weekly complimentary print mags!!!

    • I dunno why you have to bring Bradley’s beard into this, he was a great editor.

  • Larry W

    Will be sad to see CW go the way of Motorcyclist. I read these mags (and now websites) to find out how bikes work in the real world, something we can’t tell on the usual test ride. The result of Bonnier’s aquisitions and market research reminds me of Clear Channel’s; the end product no longer delivers the content I came for in the first place. ( Radio stations that play the same 4 songs over and over with little or no new music, motorcycle magazines without in depth reviews and comparison tests). Reading great reviews and comparisons have led me to bikes I probably would not have considered and over a decade of great riding because these bikes work so well for the kind of riding I do. Each reviewer has a different take on the subtler aspects of a bikes strengths and weaknesses. Reading multiple reviews gives us greater insight into wether a particular bike will work well for us long term. The diversity will be sorely missed.

  • Joe Bar

    They should go to online only. Like Cycle News.

    • therr850

      Don’t like on line. This are one of only two sites I read on line. The other is Detroit Bureau. Just not comfortable holding an iPad or tablet and the screen gives me a headache after a little bit.

  • Joe Smith

    SportRider was my favorite, and now it’s gone. It came with a year of Motorcyclist, but it’s a little too GQ looking in my opinion, and only come 6 times a year. Most of the features are 1 page and the 3 comparos barely a 1000 words. So that leaves no monthly mainstream motorcycle magazines left. It’s a sad day indeed, at least until track season starts.

  • Elk boy

    I love CW…it has gotten so thin it is hard to ration it through the month. It looks like I am going to have to stretch it even more now. It isn’t we won’t subscribe to magazines if we had the opportunity. I use to have 20 magazines coming to my house, now I have two. When was the last time you had a 12-14 year old selling them door to door for school project? When was the last time you noticed that your 7-eleven no longer has a magazine rack at all? It is hard to find a magazine is why sales suck.
    I use to be an avid reader of CarCraft and Hot Rod…they both kept looking for a new audience to read it instead of actually going to the car shows and reminding people they exist and give them a chance to subscribe at the shows or drag races etc. Same with bike magazines…only one I know that actually shows up is ER, Sturgis. We have supercross right now where is dirt rider etc? Since you are not trying to get your magazine in my hands but have forced me the rider to come find you now you have a problem. You bet I would pay twice as much for my CW subscription to get more than 12 pages to read.

  • Elk boy

    First of all find your customers and make them an offer. My neighbor
    kids are smart enough to go door to door for cans and to mow lawns,
    don’t ask don’t get. Realtors put some jackass with a spinning sign to
    point to a new housing project but the magazine guys can’t hire an
    enthusiast to put on a polo shirt and logos and walk around every bike
    show, biker event, etc to sell magazines? If you paid my way to every
    supercross event as a teen baby I would sell magazines!!

  • Elk boy

    In Oregon we require a class to get your endorsement, would it be that hard for CW to give out a free intro to riding magazine with some real good pointers to new riders and bikes and how to buy the right first bike? Then fill it with subscription cards? If you care to be there when I start my love for riding — I will be with you for life too. Get the damn thing in front of the kids coming up. Don’t tailor it to them use it to help them grow into the sport. My father has had dirt rider since I was about 6 and we kept it because they where there when I started…1975 XR75.

  • john burns

    Just heard 15 more people got the axe today at BMG. Good luck to them.

  • Cristofer Horbelt

    Just realized that MC had a new editor while I was on the can this morning. Don’t like the new format, new writers, pretty much any of it. Looks like it was written by someone who’s moonlight from Vanity Fair or GQ. Too bad because I thought they were on the right track with the previous editor, Mark Cook and Joe Gresh’s columns, while not in the same league as Peter Egans, pretty good. As for CW, two head editors? Gimme a break. Kevin Cameron is the only reason I’ve held onto that. Oh well, times change. Sorry to see them go (when Cycle went TU, didn’t have the internet to lament upon).

  • CFI_Guy

    Millennials and Boomers. We Gen-Xers are never mentioned. And yet: “In midlife, research describes them as active, happy, and achieving a work–life balance. The cohort has been credited with entrepreneurial tendencies.” (Wikipedia) Missed opportunity?