Editor Score: 85.0%
Engine 18.0/20
Suspension/Handling 13.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 10.0/10
Brakes 8.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 7.5/10
Desirability 8.0/10
Value 8.0/10
Overall Score85/100

I really like these things. Riding a Zero FX along a babbling brook and over some granite outcroppings a few years ago while hearing the water gurgle and the birds chirp was a come-to-Jesus moment that showed me the potential of silent running and instant torque. But I haven’t spent any time on electric bikes since that one.

So it was swell when TJ Aguirre dropped this brand new 10th Anniversary Zero DSR off at the manse about a month ago. The new-for-`16 DSR gets Zero’s high-po motor – rated at 106 lb-ft of torque and 67 horsepower – and the 10th Anniversary model sweetens that with special paint and graphics, new Charge Tank, red-striped wheels, tall windscreen, handguards and rear rack mount; (Troy laid out all the  2016 DSR specifics here back in January.) The regular DS remains in the line-up too, rated at 68 lb-ft and 54 hp.

A higher handlebar wouldn’t hurt, but the bike’s suspension and 19/17-inch wheels make quick work of dirty backroads.

A higher handlebar wouldn’t hurt, but the bike’s suspension and 19/17-inch wheels make quick work of dirty backroads.

I had visions of idyllic rides to the top of Saddleback Mountain, 5,687 feet above yon blue Pacific, a pleasant little ride I’ve done a bunch of times on dual-sporty ICE motorcycles.

Sadly, about 25 miles into that ride and only about 5 or 6 miles up from where the road goes from paved to gravel to dirt, the DSR was showing 60% charge remaining and it was obvious there was no way it was going to make it to Santiago Peak and then all the way home, so we turned around and settled for a cheeseburger at Cook’s Corner instead. Dangit. Um, I didn’t realize it was such long a ride out there. Seems like our back yard, almost.

It looks skinny and maneuverable, but the DSR is no lightweight; electrons are heavy.

It looks skinny and maneuverable, but the DSR is no lightweight; electrons are heavy.

This swell new 10th Anniversary DSR comes with the new Charge Tank (a $1988 option), which is supposed to allow you to get a 50% charge in an hour or so via its new J1772 plug.

Unfortunately, there are no charging stations in the places where the DSR’s looks make me want to ride it. Charging stations are springing up like wildfire everywhere, but not on dirt backroads. (Plugshare has an app that will lead you to the nearest charging station; Chargepoint claims to be the world’s largest and most open electric-vehicle charging network, with nearly 30,000 charging stations around the world and more on the way. According to the US Department of Energy, there are 35,548 charging stations in the U.S.)

Right now, there’s a federal tax credit of 10% on electric vehicles, and you can read about many other state incentives here.

Right now, there’s a federal tax credit of 10% on electric vehicles, and you can read about many other state incentives here.

Which is a shame really, because the DSR is pretty fun to ride back in there. All-way adjustable Showa suspension units provide 7 inches of nicely damped travel at either end, you get nice wide toothy footpegs and handguards, and it’s good to pick your way through the potholes and rocks as slow as you want without a clutch, an engine, or any noise whatsoever except a slight whir. Traction control is all you, but the electric motor delivers the juice so linearly it feels like an electric motor. Wait… seriously, it’s really easy to ride, with no spikes of power to break traction unless you want to by giving the throttle a more serious twist, and you can turn the ABS off if you must. You can also adjust torque and power output, along with top speed and regen effect by linking the Zero up to your smartphone via a free app.

The DSR, however, isn’t much like the FX I last rode. The official MO scales have our 10th Anniversary bike with Charge Tank at 452 pounds (33 lbs more than Zero’s claim for the 429-lb base DSR), where the FX weighs just 289 lbs (also Zero’s weight). Basically the DSR is more “Adventure” than “Dual-sport,” and most riders aren’t going to want to tackle any truly challenging trails on it. Which is just as well, since it probably can’t get to many. Then again, it depends. If you were at a remote campsite with an RV hookup, or a remote RV with a generator, then you could go places…

2016 Zero FXS Review

The single front disc with J.Juan caliper isn’t particularly strong but gets the job done, along with a little help from the motor’s Regen function.

The single front disc with J.Juan caliper isn’t particularly strong but gets the job done, along with a little help from the motor’s Regen function.

Zero’s website says our bike, the DSR with Charge Tank, should do 95 miles “combined” (70 mph cruising and city driving combined), but when I rode around to throw her on the scales at MotoGP Werks the next day riding aggressively, I went from 51% charge to less than 0% in just 36 miles (thankfully the DSR keeps going for a few miles past 0). You could do better if you were easier on the “gas,” and maybe the typical Zero buyer would be. Using the bike’s ECO mode slows acceleration enough that you barely keep up with the automobiles, and I only used it long enough to learn to avoid it.

The problem with trying to hypermile the DSR is the way it slingshots away from lights; it’s crack-pipe addictive. It’s fun to silently blast away from a line of slack-jawed car drivers, taking full advantage of the bike’s progressive and powerful 106 lb-ft of torque. I never went faster than 90 on it (Zero says top whack is 98), but the way it gets there is a hoot, and so is roll-on power from 60 mph or so on the freeway: WHOOOOOOSH!! Suspension that’s calibrated a bit stiff for slow off-road riding feels really good, firm, and well-damped when giving it all the electrons you can muster on pavement, and the Zero’s standard ergonomics/ dirtbike stance and dual-sport Pirelli MT60s encourage excessive speed. Relative to other traffic.

Yon Showa shock is all-way adjustable, and linkageless a la KTM.

Yon Showa shock is all-way adjustable, and linkageless a la KTM.

It all adds up to a really very sporty and stealthy motorcycle. The problem is that when you ride the Zero the way it wants to, no, needs to be ridden, your (okay, my…) mileage is substantially less than Zero’s claims. According to procedures developed by the SAE and run on a dyno to give consumers a good apples-to-apples number for comparison, the DSR is supposed to be good for 147 miles in “City” driving, a test of low-speed stop-and-go riding with one brief burst up to 55 mph. Maybe the “City” is Manhattan? The full SAE testing procedure can be seen here.

Zero’s Sean McLaughlin says the “70 MPH Highway, Combined” rating in its specs is the one  Zero’s own in-house numbers usually most resemble, which is a test cycle consisting of about half highway cruising and half city driving, and in which speeds never go above 70 mph. In it, the DS is supposed to go 95 miles on a charge. For me, it’s more like 80 miles `til dead battery do us park – though maybe the Zero’s charge gauge is as pessimistic as the Ducati Multistrada’s fuel gauge?

I rode it around the block a few times after the meter was reading 0% charge and it still seemed to have plenty of juice. Then I rode it up and down the street a few times and it still had juice… then I decided it was a hot day and I didn’t want to push it at all, and parked the Zero in the garage and plugged it back in, having covered 82 miles.

image08

Plugged into your everyday 110V outlet, the battery’s fully charged again in 8 or 9 hours, having sucked up about $1.46 worth of electricity on average. Our 10th Anniversary edition also came with Zero’s optional Charge tank ($1,988), which lets you plug into the increasingly ubiquitous J1772 Level 2 charging station that can cram in a 50% charge in an hour, says Zero – that’s a pretty good bump in the time it takes to drink a non-fat soy caramel latte and catch up on Instagram. A full charge from zero requires a claimed 2.9 hours, according to Zero.

If you’re the gregarious type like Sir Alan Cathcart, who was just in the States to ride Zeros to Monterey a couple months ago, the Zero’s just the excuse you need to stop every hour, have a nice cuppa tea, and make new friends. Charging stations really are sprouting up all over.

The Life Electric: Stressless in Seattle

Personally, to quote Eddie Murphy, I ain’t got that kind o’ time. I actually love the DSR riding experience, but anytime the distance of where I needed to go was the least bit in question, it stayed plugged into the garage while I hopped on the Honda NC700X instead – which you know will go 180 miles on lately about $8 of gas, though admittedly not in as amped-up a fashion as the Zero. That would likely change if I grew familiar with charging stations near the places I frequent.

She keeps rolling for quite a while after the juice-o-meter reads 0. You do get a 12V outlet right there, and the 10th Anniversary’s tall windshield is pretty aero. In addition to Sport and Eco modes, there’s also a Custom one where you can adjust regen, torque and power output, and top speed by Bluetoothing the bike up to your smartphone.

She keeps rolling for quite a while after the juice-o-meter reads 0. You do get a 12V outlet right there, and the 10th Anniversary’s tall windshield is pretty aero. In addition to Sport and Eco modes, there’s also a Custom one where you can adjust regen, torque and power output, and top speed by Bluetoothing the bike up to your smartphone.

And If you had an old-fashioned 9-to-5 daily commute, the Zero would be an awesome choice, particularly if you had an ICE bike in the garage for longer hauls. Plugging in your bike becomes as normal as plugging in your phone, and you do feel smug every time you pass a gas station. I’d feel even smugger plugging in at work…

For the Zero buyer, though, it’s really not about the money – and gas would have to get really expensive to change that. A lot of people just like the tech and being early adopters, a lot of people just like being green – possibly for no other reason than to tick off all the angry haters who can’t ever not point out that electricity comes from burning fuel, which would be a big incentive for me personally. Well, plenty of electricity now comes from solar, especially in places like hippy-dippy ground zero Santa Cruz, California, where we hereby offer up our official MO congratulations to Zero on its tenth anniversary and wish it many happy returns. (And California just passed SB 32 yesterday; one of its aims is to lower emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030.)

Someday all motorcycle hangouts will have charging stations.

Someday all motorcycle hangouts will have charging stations.

If you’re a multi-motorcycle household looking for a short hopper/commuter, the Zero’s a fantastic choice. If you can only have one bike, though, the lack of range remains a dealbreaker. And if you really wanted our 10th Anniversary bike, the deal’s already broken anyway since Zero only made, and already sold, all 50 of them. Not to worry, they’ve got plenty of base-model DSRs starting at $14,395 (after your $1600 federal tax credit!).

Sneak up on cats. Ride on the sidewalk. Push the limits of moto-decency. Nobody cares. So far.

Sneak up on cats. Ride on the sidewalk. Push the limits of moto-decency. Nobody cares. So far.

2016 Zero DSR 10th Anniversary Edition
+ Highs

  • Twist and go fast
  • Linear, big power
  • What could go wrong?
– Sighs

  • Still range
  • Great personality
  • It doesn’t really need you as much as an ICE bike does
2016 Zero DSR 10th Anniversary Edition
MSRP $18,995
Motor Type Z-Force 75-7R passively air-cooled, high efficiency, radial flux, interior permanent hi-temp magnet, brushless electric motor
Controller High efficiency, 660 amp, 3-phase brushless controller with regenerative deceleration
Compression Ratio No
Fuel System Electricity via 110 or 220V outlet, J1772 charge port
Transmission No
Final Drive Belt
Front Suspension Showa 41mm inverted fork; adjustable spring preload, rebound damping, compression damping; 7-in travel
Rear Suspension Showa shock; adjustable spring preload, rebound damping, compression damping; 7-in travel
Front Brake 320mm disc, 2-piston caliper; standard ABS
Rear Brake 240mm disc, 1-piston caliper, ABS
Front Tire 100/90-19 Pirelli MT-60
Rear Tire 130/80-17 Pirelli MT-60
Frame Aluminum spar
Rake/Trail 26.5°/ 4.6 in (117mm)
Wheelbase 56.2 in
Seat Height 33.2 in
Curb Weight 452 lb
Fuel Capacity No stinkin fuel
Colors Metallic Black, 10th Anniversary graphics
Warranty Two years

Free Insurance Quote

Enter your ZIP code below to get a free insurance quote.

Zero Dealer Price Quote

Get price quotes for Zero from local motorcycle dealers.
  • DickRuble

    Honda NC700X or Honda CB500X, that is the question.

  • Buzz

    Thanks for the real world test JB. Much better than fan boy message board posts.

    In 3-5 years battery technology will be way better!

    Says the man reading a test of a 10th anniversary model.

    • Steven Day

      Around year 5 or 6, range did start doubling. It’s slowed down again recently. I can attest that riding in traffic, it gets over 100 miles, and you clutch hand won’t cramp up.

  • Steve C

    Or I can just hop on my $1500 XT350 50+mpg with my 4gal Clark tank and go just about anywhere.
    I did test ride the DSR and when I hit Lotto I’ll be buying one.

  • schizuki

    80 miles! What progress in a decade!

    “Really informed ppl tell me practical battery technology is 3 to 5 years away.” – Duke (?), probably six years ago.

    The vehicle of the future! For at least another decade!

    • Buzz

      It’s like a really fun rollercoaster that you have to wait 2.9 hours to get on.

      And if you charge it with an RV generator (although no one runs their generator 8-9 hours) wouldn’t that make it a gasoline powered motorcycle?

      • Ian Parkes

        Not so much. People do seem to think owners are hanging about while their EVs are charging, but you really don’t have to do that. They won’t mind if you do other stuff.

        • Bob Coco

          Most of my trip on my Zero are day trips on the weekend with my wife, and friends on their ice bikes. I usually have the range to go the complete ride without needing a charge, but there are so many charging places now, I just time my lunch stop with a charge. Plug in, eat lunch, grab 20-30 miles range. Now, I have an aftermarket supercharger on order which will allow me to charge from 0% to 80% in 43 minutes. Most of my luch stops are that long or more.

    • Jason

      My 82 mile EV takes me back and forth to work every day without issue. No maintenance, no gas, exceptionally practical. The money saved on the commute can be much better spent on other things.

      2016 Chevy Spark / $100 per month / $0 down / 39 months / 10K miles per year.

      • Buzz

        No doubt it works fine for that. But that is a pretty limited use case. It can’t do anything else but that.

        • Jason

          Limited use? I do that commute 5 days a week / 50 weeks a year. My commute is by far the majority of the time I spend it a vehicle.

          • Old MOron

            Hadn’t thought of it this way. Good perspective.

          • Buzz

            I said limited use case which means you have a two-wheeled errand runner and nothing more. This is a motorcycle website. The road less traveled and all that. Sometimes I ride 150 miles at lunch to have a sandwich in the mountains.

            I get the fact that it’s a good commuter. It’s not a good motorcycle though. It’s a 3rd bike at best in my garage.

          • Jason

            Some people primarily use a motorcycle to commute and run around town. If I could legally split lanes I would have a Zero FX for commuting. I can’t so I don’t.

            My long distance rides are generally done on vacation, on a rented bike. I can rent a bike for weeks for the purchase price of a new one and I get to match the bike to the ride. I sold my BMW a few years ago because I was riding rented bikes more than my own. Now I just have a classic Kawasaki for when I want to ride around town or go for a joy ride.

          • ‘Mike Smith

            I have two bikes, a R1 and a Zero SR. The SR got 8,000 miles put on it this past year. The R1 got about 500. Both bikes are fantastic in their own way, but I almost always take the Zero unless I have to go long distances, which is almost never.

          • regexp

            Sometimes I ride 150 miles at lunch to have a sandwich in the mountains.

            So you complain about a limited use case by presenting an even more limited use case? People use motorcycles for all sorts of reasons. Not just for your lunch in the mountains.

          • Buzz

            The first word of the sentence was “sometimes.” I can commute, run errands, go on long rides or ride across country on one motorcycle. I don’t think that’s limited use case.

            You battery zealots are always one electron short of a full charge.

      • Starmag

        Got subsidies?

        • Jason

          I would have if I bought the car. It would have been $10,500 to buy it after the GM rebate and federal tax credit.

          I chose to lease and the leasing company did not roll the tax credit into the lease. I didn’t complain because $100 a month is crazy cheap.

          Available at a Chevy dealer near you.

      • Kevin Duke

        Damn, that’s quite a value!

        • Jason

          It is. I usually buy a car and keep it for 10 years but $100 a month is half the cost of just the purchase price $24K car over 10 years.

  • Old MOron

    This is the first review to make an electric bike half-way interesting.
    That price? Not so much.

    Quick question: why is “great personality” listen in Sighs column?

    • john burns

      well, she’s really not much to look at.

      • Old MOron

        Oh, now I get it.

  • Old MOron

    PS: That transmission/clutch score is hilarious. But it makes sense.

    PPS: The lead photo is fooking awesome.

  • John B.

    This is the most rational electric motorcycle review I have read; the good, the bad, and the great personality.

  • Mark Vizcarra

    Geez, how many times do you have to review these bikes? So in about 10 years, they progressed from a 50 mile range to 80 miles? I guess that is progress. I wouldn’t mind owning this since I own an electric car and get free charging at work, but certain items like the chargepack should be included and not an option that that price point

    • Bob Coco

      I have the SR and lowest range I get is 120mi and that’s with a passenger. Single rider as a commuter highway would be close to 100mi. My commute is 3 mi though. :-)

  • JMDonald

    Federal alchemists are working 24/7/365 to find a new battery material that will allow charging in less than five minutes weigh in at less than one pound per cubic foot and increase the range of two wheeled vehicles to over 500 miles per charge. With only 20 trillion dollars of debt and another 100 trillion in unfunded liabilities the U.S. Government is committed to subsidizing this research until a viable product is developed. In other news hot chicks are abandoning millennial hipsters and gravitating towards alpha male alt-right politically incorrect gasoline powered motorcycle riders. Elon Musk is optimistic this new technology will also help Tesla but says more subsidies will be required to perpetuate the myth.

    • Steven Day

      What? Commuting on an electric bike for years and I can say, it works already. It’s not a touring bike, but it isn’t sold as one. Zero employs there own battery engineers, the subsidies that go to buyers, not Zero, are a new things starting back up this last year. Look at how much oil is subsidized if you want to cut the budget somewhere. I prefer to use the long exhaust and dump my pollution away from dense populations, instead of pumping it into the air of the guy behind you. If you feel exhaust is safe, run your bike in your garage with the door shut for a few hours and let me know how it goes.

      • JMDonald

        Subsidies are subsidies. It doesn’t matter who they go to. If electric motorcycles were so great they wouldn’t need a subsidy. It is not the government’s place to decide winners and losers in the marketplace. Oil is not subsidized. It doesn’t need to be. None of your nuanced reasoning changes the reality of the electric motorcycle’s inherent weakness or the federal government’s irresponsible spending. Battery technology is nowhere near where it needs to be for an electric to compete with its petroleum competition. As far as running my bike in the garage with the door shut, I have a better idea. Why don’t you stick your electric bike up you ass. It can keep your head company since it’s already up there.

        • Steven Day

          “Subsidies are subsidies. It doesn’t matter who they go to. If electric motorcycles were so great they wouldn’t need a subsidy.”

          I completely agree. And once gas powered vehicles improve, they will lose their fuel subsidies. Of course, that money goes to oil companies, not to end users. That sounds much better for tax payers.

          Also, electric cars don’t get subsidies, you get a tax break for buying them. Like how you get a tax break for owning a home. I guess the housing industry just isn’t ready to stand on it’s own either. Maybe in another hundred years, like gas powered cars.

          • JMDonald

            It is not part of governments enumerated powers to subsidize anything. If owning an electric motorcycle makes you feel better about yourself I am happy for you. It does not change the reality of what they are. They are limited in scope and to expensive to compete in the marketplace. The country runs on energy. Electric energy is limited in its use. It cannot compete, It is that simple. Don’t go away mad Mr. Day. Just go away.

          • Steven Day

            I think you’ve got me wrong, I don’t care about the environment. I rode a little Suzuki as a commuter bike last and I had to hit the gas station (not on my route to and from work) every three days. The gas stations around here are crowded and it’s a pain to get to. Plus, the dealer is an hour each way away due to traffic, to get maintenance done on it.

            I wake up with a full “tank” every morning, I don’t pay for oil changes, value adjustments, just break pads and break fluid, and that’s going to take years to need done thanks to regenerative breaking. I save tons on my bike over the years, and my time savings not having to go out of my way to get gas or maintenance is worth thousands every year. I spend enough time in traffic, no need to wait around for explosive fuel.

            You’ll love this – I’m getting solar installed. It does break even faster thanks to the tax break it gives me, but so does my home loan. I’m getting it so I can charge up my vehicles during emergencies, if power is out I’ll have my furnace fan going and my vehicles charging all day.

            Electric cars are just as amazing. Can’t wait to get my second one next month. No more dealer visits for maintenance, or gas stops!

            Not going away angry, life is great.

          • JMDonald

            Like I said. Limited. Ride safe.

          • Steven Day

            As a commuter bike, especially because they have no clutch or gears, they’re great if someone can afford the large up front investment. Not great at wheelies or road trips. Until I install my 30 minute charger next month, just I just need to figure out how to wheely it more easily. :p

            Enjoy your three day weekend!

          • Ian Parkes

            Why do you always have to insult people you disagree with? And then tell them not to get mad… And to go away… You are not speaking for anyone else so why not take your own advice? Actually, I’m conflicted. I’m happy for you to keep showing yourself up like this but, on the whole, continuously resorting to insults, far from enlivening a debate, is tedious and banal.

          • JMDonald

            I almost never comment about or offer response to anyone else’s comments unless they feel the need to comment on mine. There is a difference between offering up information and espousing twenty lines of diatribe so they can elevate their obviously low self esteem quotient. The electric bike crowd (among others) are so sensitive that any comment not declaring them the world’s supreme vehicle for some reason demands they set me straight about how great they are. I am not commenting to debate. I post my opinion and don’t need a lesson from a bunch of pedantic nebbishes as to why it bothers them so. Ride safe Mr. Parkes. I wish you no ill will.

    • ZeroLover

      Vehicles have been documented as killing people not involved in crashes since the leaded fuel debacle.

      Vehicular air pollution is one of the biggest threats to the health and well being of the citizenry and the government is obligated to protection.

      Just one quick google… on costs of vehicular air pollution returns over $300 billion annually. Imagine the payoff to avoiding that every year.

      http://www.uctc.net/research/papers/321.pdf

      You might love the part about delineation between “chronic deaths” and “non-harvest deaths” (spoiler alert , a “non-harvest death” only takes the last few days or weeks of life).

      • JMDonald

        Quite the pedantic pompous ass. Pound sand Zero Lover. Sorry you’re so threatened. You may go back to your safe space now.

        • ZeroLover

          Thanks – I was worried by shying away from calling the entire automotive industry accessories to negligent homicide I was somehow left the post too soft. I’m guessing you were a kid when (or where) lead levels were high.

          • JMDonald

            I’m guessing english is not your first language based on the poorly constructed paragraph in your first response. Your reference to “just one quick google” says a lot about your ignorance of what a web search is. Don’t worry though China and India along with any single volcanic eruption are polluting so much it really doesn’t matter what vehicle you drive. Yes, you are a pompous ass. Did I mention pedantic? Oh yeah, I did. Dumb and stupid is a road to nowhere. Take the first available exit if you can.

          • ZeroLover

            Jealous you haven’t thought to congregated “google” before, or just that you haven’t thought before?
            A word means precisely what I intend for it to mean, no more, no less. It is all who is master.

            Another quick google:
            Scientific American – 2009.
            According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the world’s volcanoes, both on land and undersea, generate about 200 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually, while our automotive and industrial activities cause some 24 billion tons of CO2 emissions every year worldwide. Despite the arguments to the contrary, the facts speak for themselves: Greenhouse gas emissions from volcanoes comprise less than one percent of those generated by today’s human endeavors.

            China has been shutting down dirty power plants and adding green ones, so while the US eclipses them in per capita CO2 (which is only one of the chemicals released by autos) China is getting greener… and the US has to contend with derailers of good policy.

            But of course jump back to your original rant about government working hard to solve this problem, don’t forget to mention the petroleum industry spending millions (and working 24×7 trying to keep the problem going strong.

            You are very one note with “pedantic”, reminds me of a piano tuner. Not many applaud the piano tuner.

            It matter what vehicle EVERYONE drives. You haven’t denied your lead based childhood diet, though you demonstrate all the symptoms.

          • JMDonald

            So, is English your first language?

          • ZeroLover

            Just kicking your dead horse… with another googling expedition.

            http://articles.latimes.com/2008/jun/11/autos/hy-throttle11

            Motorcycles and scooters are, on average, about twice as fuel efficient as cars. Compact and lightweight, their internal-combustion engines do a better job of converting fuel into energy that makes the vehicle move. But extracting more energy from the fuel has a downside. It produces greater amounts of a smog-forming emission called oxides of nitrogen.

            In California, such bikes make up 3.6% of registered vehicles and 1% of vehicle miles traveled, yet they account for 10% of passenger vehicles’ smog-forming emissions in the state. In fact, the average motorbike is about 10 times more polluting per mile than a passenger car, light truck or SUV, according to a California Air Resources Board comparison of emissions-compliant vehicles.

          • JMDonald

            Like I said. Tu stultus es.

          • ZeroLover

            Newsfed to me today:

            Tiny magnetic particles produced by car engines and brakes can travel into the human brain and may trigger Alzheimer’s disease, scientists have warned.

            http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/09/05/air-pollution-particles-linked-to-alzheimers-found-in-human-brai/

            But until now, nobody thought that the particles could reach the brain. The new research suggests the particles can be inhaled and enter the brain through the olfactory nerve, which takes information about smells to the brain.

            Prof Anthony Seaton, Emeritus professor of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at the University of Aberdeen said: “This is an important study and adds to the body of evidence that the combustion of fossil fuels has widespread toxic effects on our health.

            “The solution to this is literally in our own hands as we take hold of the steering wheel.”

  • Starmag

    At least the short range is made up for by the reasonable price and good looks.

  • kenneth_moore

    I rode the Victory e-bike (Empulse) at their demo in Daytona. My pal and I were both really impressed with it. The ride leader suggested leaving it in 2ond or 3rd gear, although it has a 6 speed gearbox and clutch. The linear power, top shelf suspension, and super low cg made it handle better than anything I can remember riding. Fast as heck too. But, it’s a $20k bike. A motorcycle version of the Tesla Model 3 would be cool.

  • Bob Coco

    Good review but I dispute that it can “barely keep up with cars in eco mode” I have a SR (same motor and specs as the DSR) and in ECO I can pull ahead and pass pretty much any car from a dead stop. But, the author doesnt understand that ECO mode is designed to mimic a gas motorcycle. so it will have a similar lag by design. I however don’t use eco mode, I use custom mode and program the bike to perform how I want it to perform. I can pretty much beat any car, any time. Then there’s sport mode, which is downright crazy, 0-60 in 3.2 seconds. I switch to that when I want to pass, it’s really too powerful torque to use in normal street riding.

  • Manny

    I have the 16′ SR version which is the same thing essentially without the dirt tires, windscreen and handlebars. I can easily get over 130 miles on a charge in custom mode will full reg activated and full power like in sport mode. It’s when your cracking the throttle wide open and hooning the bike around EVERYWHERE when you deplete the range down to what’s he’s reviewed here. His review should’ve been more thorough and tried to get both numbers, when WOT is at play everywhere AND being conservative.