Triumph revealed its new Speedmaster, a modern British cruiser that shares many similarities with the Bonneville Bobber but with more practical versatility. The 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster is targeted for those who like the Bonneville T120 but want more touring capability and cruiser styling or a Bonneville Bobber but want seating for a passenger.

Related: 2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber Review

The new Speedmaster is powered by the same 1200cc High Torque engine and the same tuning as the Bobber, claiming 77 hp at 6100 rpm and 78.2 lb-ft. at 4000 rpm. According to Triumph, the engine produces 10% more horsepower and torque than the Bonneville T120 at 4500 rpm. And for those who are familiar with the old 865cc Speedmaster, the new model and its larger engine claims a 25% increase in peak horsepower and 42% increase in maximum torque output. The chromed stainless steel exhaust system is actually twin-skinned to hide the catalytic converter, and delivers a distinctive exhaust note Triumph describes as being deeper and richer than the Bonneville T120. A ride-by-wire throttle system offers two riding modes, Road and Rain. Cruise control and traction control come as standard.

The chassis is similar to the Bobber’s, with a gloss black powder coated tubular steel twin cradle frame and a hard-tail look. The rear subframe is different, to better support the weight of a passenger. Rider footpegs are mounted farther forward for a cruiser-style riding position while the swept back beach bars make for an easy, comfortable reach.

The wire spoke front wheel sports twin 310mm discs with Brembo twin-piston floating calipers. A single 255mm rotor and single-piston Nissin caliper is paired to the rear wheel. ABS comes standard.

The gaitered 41mm cartridge front fork offers 3.5 inches of travel while the hidden rear shock offers 2.9 inches of travel, which Triumph claims is up to 36% more than similar-styled bikes from other manufacturers. The rear shock is also preload adjustable with multiple stepped settings to improve rider and pillion comfort. Speaking of pillions, the rear seat is removable, and Triumph offers an optional backrest.

Other features include a full LED headlight (with daytime running light in some markets outside North America), LED rear light, LED turn signals, circular instrument nacelle with analog tachometer and LCD digital display, and a torque-assist clutch for reduced clutch lever effort. The fuel tank is larger than the Bobber’s, holding 3.2 gallons of fuel. Triumph claims the Speedmaster gets 65.4 mpg. Triumph also claims a 590 pound dry weight.

The 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster will arrive in dealerships in February, with three color options: Jet Black, Cranberry Red and a two-tone Fusion White and Phantom Black with twin coach line. Pricing is to be announced.

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  • gjw1992

    I’m getting old – I like the look of this Speedmaster. Tank capacity up from the basic Bobber as well, so would make it more practical for me (…if I was ever to consider purchasing one of course…). But 590 pounds/240+KG – uses lead as ballast?

  • Metropolis Fellow

    HP needs to be closer to 100.

  • Gabriel Owens

    First time I ever looked at a cruiser and thought “beautiful”.

  • Born to Ride

    Is that blue one not a production color scheme? Looks beautiful.

  • ADB

    Beautiful. And I’m not a cruiser guy.

  • allworld

    Triumph is really getting some mileage out of the new parallel twins and the Bonneville platform, and doing a beautiful job at it as well.
    I would love to see this type of expansion with the revised 1050 and new 765 triples. Please bring back the Sprint ST. That was a touring bike for people who like SPORT touring.
    Or perhaps produce a bike similar to MV’s Turismo Veloce with the new 765 triple.

    • Born to Ride

      Supposedly they are doing a ST version of the 765, but the return of the 1050 would be preferable to me. Just take the speedie and put a stout quarter fairing and bags on it. I’m game.

      • allworld

        “Just take the speedie and put a stout quarter fairing and bags on it. I’m game.:
        Put the 1215 Triple in it along the lines of the KTM Super Duke GT, that would work for me.

        • Born to Ride

          The 1215 engine doesn’t make any more power than the 1050 engine. It just gives you lazier power delivery with an abundance of grunt. Similar to the 800cc vs the 675cc of years past. That being said, if they came out with a new 1200cc triple that was built to produce real power, that would be awesome.

          • allworld

            more bore less stroke………. sounds good. More grunt with a touring focused sport bike isn’t a bad thing either.

      • sgray44444

        I’d love to see a 765 SPORT tourer along the lines of the old SprintST. That would be purrrrrfect.

        • Born to Ride

          It’s probably just going to be a street triple with a beefier subframe and a fairing, so I think you won’t have to worry about your sporting emphasis.

          • sgray44444

            I hope so. That sounds great.

  • TheMarvelous1310

    It should have had one of those café-style half fairings if it was gonna be a Speedmaster. And the mid controls from the Bobber. Still, it’s a looker, and it’s probably good competition for the Scout and good inspiration for the next Sportster, which should have the V-Rod motor.

  • Sayyed Bashir

    So the feet forward riding position, 2.9″ of rear wheel travel, 590 lbs dry weight and a 3.2 gallon tank are OK for Triumph but not for Harley? Isn’t that a double standard? Besides, 65.4 mpg for a 1200cc High Torque engine seems optimistic. Should be more like 40-45 mpg.

    • Piglet (Lawrence of Bavaria)

      Wonder if that mileage figure is for Imperial Gallons? Works out to 52.3 mpg with US Gallons, which seems reasonable for someone with a light throttle hand.

      • Auphliam

        That’s what I was thinking as well…prolly Imperial measurement

      • DickRuble

        The new motorcycle industry trend.. in the future they’ll quote the mileage in Lunar Gallons (about 10 US gallons), which will allow them to claim 500miles/gallon.

      • Born to Ride

        Previously their fuel economy claims translated accurately as you suggest.

    • DickRuble

      We agree with you: This particular Triumph is almost as bad as a Harley. Except it probably has an engine that is way better than anything HD has ever made. Other than that.. it’s still a POS.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        I wasn’t saying it is good or bad. I love my feet forward Harley and it is not a hearse (maybe a very fast hearse). It weighs 700 lbs. Triumph is trying to get a piece of the Harley market. They go on and on about the sound of their exhaust, which is pitiful compared to a Harley.

        • DickRuble

          Again, we agree: to be focusing on the sound of the exhaust is pitiful. Like buying a horse because you like the way it farts.

          • sgray44444

            I disagree. The character of the exhaust note is probably the biggest draw for Harley. They certainly don’t have performance to brag about, as they can’t make a proper sport bike that weighs less than 600 lbs. They don’t have technology. In fact, if they made a motor with an offset crank pin or put the V-angle at 90 degrees, it would no longer sound like a Harley. They don’t handle. They can only be fast in a straight line with a lot of extra money put into the motor. Let’s give them their due: that is one great exhaust note!

          • Sayyed Bashir

            You can tell if a passing motorcycle is a Harley just by the sound. Some riders put a loud exhaust on their Japanese cruiser but you can tell it is not a Harley.

          • sgray44444

            I agree completely. I would really like to know what it is that they do to make the sound what it is. Honda and others have copied the single crank pin, and yet they don’t have that “pop” to the exhaust or the deep rumble. Piped Japanese V-twins tend to sound flat and obnoxious.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            One thing is the 45 degree V-twin angle. As far as I know, S&S is the only one who has copied that. Japanese were afraid of getting HD upset (what with the 1983 tariff). But other V-twin angles don’t sound the same. Harley also has the fork and blade crank. I wonder if the Japanese have copied that. Finally the two valve heads. The Milwaukee Eight doesn’t sound the same as previous HD V-twins. Japanese are into refinement and by doing that they destroy the sound and vibration. Harley’s ace-in-the-hole in the brute raw sound and vibration with a hint of restrained violence which no one else can copy.

          • Strat

            “brute raw sound and vibration with a hint of restrained violence.” Could you possibly come up with a more B.S. filled, garbage statement than that? I highly doubt it.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Have you ever owned a Harley? If not, who cares what you have to say.

          • sgray44444

            I was wondering how the 8 would sound. there are valid reasons to use a two valve head that involve better low speed efficiency and torque production. David Vizard has studied and written about it. It was a bigger risk than most realize to go with a 4 valve chamber. I liked your description and thought it was valid.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Thank you! I don’t like the sound of the Milwaukee Eight. It is a continuous burbling sound instead of the potato-potato of the previous engines. They said they were able to preserve the authentic Harley sound but I don’t think they did. Maybe we’ll get used to it after a while. People will give it a pass because of the better performance and bigger engines, but it almost sounds like a Honda.

          • sgray44444

            That’s disappointing. I had a feeling that the new heads would have to change the sound, but I haven’t heard one yet.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            I hear them all the time at the dealership and recently at Street Vibrations. There is nothing wrong with the sound. It’s just different. And I haven’t yet heard one with loud pipes since the bikes are so new.

          • Born to Ride

            I happen to prefer the 270 degree firing order twin exhaust note. But then again I love me some 90 degree v-twins and the new triumph parallel twins have the closest sound.

          • DickRuble

            yeah.. you buy your horses based on the way they fart

          • Born to Ride

            There is nothing wrong with preferring a flatulent horse provided it rides as good as it farts. Life is balance dick. You’ll be less irritable when you learn to like something.

    • michael32853hutson@yahoo.com

      i agree-depending on how hard you crank it 50-60 mpg with the 883,45-55 with the 1200 Sportster sounds about right-the EFI ones since 2007 anyway

    • Born to Ride

      No they don’t get a pass. The fact that this is basically a softtail with a smaller engine isn’t lost on us. I just happen to think it’s much prettier than Harley’s equivalent bike, but I won’t argue that this is functionally better without back to back rides.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        Function is in the eye of the beholder. Triumph riders like Triumphs and Harley riders like Harleys. The Speedmaster may have some characteristics of a cruiser but it is in no way a Harley.

        • Born to Ride

          Always the needless contrarian… I agree with your assertion and you find a way to disagree with my agreement. You must be a blast at dinner parties.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            It is not needless. As I said, a Triumph is no Harley, no matter how hard they try. So it is needless to compare them. They are two different animals. Either you like Harleys or you like Triumphs. Although my friend who has a 2017 Bonneville was drooling over a custom Harley for sale at the Street Vibrations in Reno.

          • sgray44444

            I like both. They both have their charms and unique character. I wouldn’t feel inferior riding this motorcycle if I liked it, and I wouldn’t compare it to a Harley, because it isn’t one. Sure, it isn’t exactly the textbook Triumph- definitely a British take on a Harley in some respects, but who cares. At this point, the cruiser market is a derivative of a derivative, so why point the finger? It’s like beer or music or anything else with a strong subjective appeal; it’s just a matter of taste.

        • Strat

          Wrong again. Function is what it is, it does what it does.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Tell a Harley rider their bike is not functionally better than any other bike. As I said, being better depends on the beholder. Some things are better for some people but not for others.

      • Strat

        I agree about the look. I’ve never owned a cruiser, but 11 years ago I almost pulled the trigger on 2007 Speedmaster. I do like the look of this bike, but the 200 mile+ range on a tank of gas made it even more interesting,…problem is I ain’t buyin’ that.

        • Born to Ride

          I’ve got a Moto Guzzi California, love the way it looks and the feel of the ride. It’s an experience unto itself that is immensely gratifying or uniquely frustrating depending on the riding conditions. I do have to say though, if I was forced to sell a bike my cruiser would go first, Regardless of the brand or model.

  • WPZ

    I understand the need to rummage through the old Triumph model names, but, gag-
    A Speedmaster is nothing like this thing, and this thing will never be a master of any kind of speed.
    If you’ve ever seen a Triumph Speedmaster in the metal, you would gag, too.
    Good heavens.

  • Tim Sawatzky

    Well it’s definitely not a copycat cruiser. I think it might be one of those bikes that I have to see in person to get a good feel for it. It does seem very heavy, unless 590 is the wet weight, but even then, the Scout 60 is listed at 524 lbs dry, and just from looks, it seems like the Speedmaster is taller. Still, it looks great and I am excited to see one in the dealership. I just wonder if it differentiates enough from the T120/bobber.

  • Daniel Benjamin

    IMHO the last gen speedmaster was much, much prettier. I liked how the tank, wheels and frame seemed more lithe, and seemed to make it look like it moved when sitting still. This is a little too stout for my taste.

  • michael32853hutson@yahoo.com

    a beautiful machine! since they’ve ditched the dual rear shocks of the classic Bonneville,can we also get rid of the fake Amal Monoblocs? the throttle bodies with some tasteful air cleaners would work

  • John A. Stockman

    Feet forward, hmm, but definitely not a me-too HD-similar offering. Which for me, makes it a contender. Ergonomically speaking, I have never been able to tolerate my feet out in front of me and most of my weight on my tail bone. Feet underneath the seat, more natural, and especially important for traditional cruisers with their lack of suspension travel in the rear. I’ve ridden a few HDs where the travel out back is 1.5-2″. With weight on the tail bone and no way to absorb the lack of travel with your legs, well, it even sounds painful before you ride it and then realize it is after a few miles. I like Triumph’s approach here with the styling, no one is going to think it’s a copy of what HD is doing. Besides, if a non feet-forward foot peg position is desired, they have other terrific bikes that do offer that layout. Handle bars not to high, just right, liking the aesthetics of that one with the saddle bags and windshield.

    • Born to Ride

      If I got one of these, I wouldn’t leave the dealer until they installed mid controls.

      • DickRuble

        And you would be stuck at that dealership ’till the cows come home. At the given seat height you wouldn’t be able to ride the bike with mid controls.

        • Born to Ride

          Ha probably, I like the floorboards on my Guzzi. I usually ride with my heels hooked over the back edge which gives them a mid control feel with room to stretch.

        • Born to Ride

          Also I don’t see why the controls off the bobber wouldn’t fit.

        • Mark D

          Its the same seat high as the Bobber. Same frame, same engine, should be easy to mount mid-mounts.

    • 12er

      Compression fracture in my lower back and 36″ inseam = no feet forward.

  • Deryl Clark

    It is too “thick” to be a Triumph…………….

  • sgray44444

    I dig the looks, but not the spokes.

  • blansky

    Pretty good looking bike.

  • Patriot159

    Looks nice but feet forward with 2″ of actual suspension accounting for sag and my spine hurts thinking about riding it on ‘real’ roads.

  • Gary Russell

    Why can’t they mention what the seat height is? Being short I need to know that before I even care to go look. Need to sell my Ducati first also, possibly trade it.

    • Born to Ride

      Pretty sure the seat height will be lower than any Ducati.

      • Gary Russell

        My Ducati Monster seat height is 30.3 inches. Lower than most sport bikes.

        • Born to Ride

          And this will be well under 30″. It’s a cruiser. If I was a betting man I’d say 28″

    • Mark Vizcarra

      Seat height means absolutely nothing because HD’s have low seat heights, but have really wide seats, which defeats the purpose of having a low seat if you legs are spread out like your at the Dr.’s office. You can have a high seat height with a thin seat and still be able to have both feet on the ground.

      • Gary Russell

        Article is about a Triumph, not a Harley. When your legs are short, it doesn’t matter how wide the seat is, you just need to have the bike seat low.

        • Mark Vizcarra

          It doesnt matter if it’s a harley, triumph, suzuki, etc or any brand. You do not seem understand how wide or narrow seats affect how your feet will touch the floor.

          I think you need to re-read my statement again. Im not sure why you think a wider seat doesnt matter “as long as the seat height is low” Then explain why?

          • Gary Russell

            It’s simple. Whether the seat is wide or narrow, if the bike is too high, my feet don’t touch the ground. It becomes a matter of how much I have to tip the bike over to reach the ground, as if the bike is real high, I can’t flat foot both sides even with a narrow seat. It wasn’t a problem back when I was 30, but it gets to be a little harder now that I have reached 65. Arthritis and other physical problems make higher bikes more difficult to control. My Ducati has a narrow seat, but I also have shrunk an inch and a half since my first days of riding. I am not going to bother to even LOOK at a new bike if I don’t have a clue about what the seat height is. I have sat on a lot of bikes in my time riding. My friend has a Moto Guzzi Centauro, but I can’t ride it not because I can’t reach the ground, but because the frigging kick stand sits to far forward.

        • Born to Ride

          My moto Guzzi is by far the lowest saddle of my stable and it is the hardest to flat foot. The saddle splays my legs outward like I’m riding a horse. My multistrada is 6″ higher (or more) and I can put the balls of my feet firmly on the ground or flat foot on one side effortlessly. That’s all he’s trying to say, just more controntationally.

          • Gary Russell

            I know what he is saying. If I wanted to have my legs “splayed” to the outside, I would get somethings with wings. LOL Seats can be customized some, the height of what connects to my crotch is the most important part of it for me.

  • Mr. Toast

    needle skip, 3.2 gallon tank, 3.2 gallon tank, 3.2 gallon tank…

    • Born to Ride

      150 mile range isn’t too horrendous. These twins from triumph are real fuel sippers.

  • manfromsima

    Dam I got wood looking at this hot thing wow.Ill take a black one with that most beautiful brown single seat.

  • Ellis Tomago

    I think I like the old one better.

  • Gary

    I am waiting patiently for Triumph to figure out that we want retro looks but with the ability to run tubeless tires … maybe a cast wheel option or spoke tech.

  • Dino Sabelli

    What a beautiful machine, hope in comes to Canada as well. Cheers everyone!