You read that right, folks – Motorcycle.com wants to ride your bike. By now, loyal Motorcycle.com readers are familiar with our Church of MO pieces we run every Sunday. Reviving the stories and reviews from the motorcycles of yesteryear, it allows us to admire the engineering, styling, or otherwise excellent decisions some companies have made with models that have withstood the test of time. It also lets us laugh, mock, and otherwise shame the motorcycles that should have never made it out of the design phase.

Reflecting on the past is one thing; we want to relive it. That’s right, we actually want to ride these motorcycles again. Good or bad, new or old, if you have a motorcycle you think is worthy of being ridden and reviewed on the pages of Motorcycle.com (and on our Youtube channel), we want to hear from you.

Of course, there are some qualifiers:

  • First, you must be local to our Southern California-based crew, or otherwise able to get here easily and willingly. Alternatively, if you’re willing to pay for plane tickets and lodging, we’re happy to come to you.
  • Second, and this should go without saying, the motorcycle must be in safe, fully operational mechanical condition.

In case it wasn’t clear – we’re going to ride your motorcycle. However, just because we like to thrash the motorcycles the manufacturers lend us to test, rest assured we’re much more respectful with bikes that actually belong to people. No smokey burnouts or multi-gear downshifts and clutch dumps here.

There are some machines from the past that are obvious standouts – the Ducati 916 immediately comes to mind. Riding one today and comparing how well it has fared with the march of time appeals to us. Other motorcycles, like the Honda Pacific Coast are largely ridiculed, but also have an almost cult-like following by those who appreciate function over form. We’d like to ride one (again, in Burns’ case) and see what the fuss is about.

Those are just two examples. There are countless motorcycles from days gone by that the MO staff would love to try, and we think our readers would like to know more about them, too. Street bikes or dirt, knobbies or slicks, kick start or electric (we prefer the latter), four strokes or two, if you have a non-current motorcycle – as in, it’s no longer being manufactured and is not available as a new model in dealers – and are willing to let us ride and review it, we’d love to hear from you. Send us a note – email CastingCall@motorcycle.com if you’re interested.