Today I found myself stepping off of a plane in Minneapolis, MN, with a few other journalists. While the X Games are currently in full swing here in the “Twin Cities,” we were in town for the launch of a new Indian Scout. The 2018 Indian Scout Bobber is a minimalistic, low-slung, blacked-out version of its predecessor. Looking at the bike once the covers came off, the word muscle comes to mind. The kind of motorcycle that kicks sand in your face and takes your girlfriend. I like it.

2018 Indian Scout Bobber

The Indian executive team mentioned the word “badass” almost a few too many times, but after seeing the new bikes, it is the simplest way to describe them. And, of course, we get it. Indian is looking to attract a younger crowd with a visually more tough and custom look. Also, this explains why we are in town the same weekend as the X Games.

“We are trying to move the brand away from just being a heritage brand, expanding it a little further and to attract new customers,” Indian President Steve Menneto confirmed at the bike’s unveiling. Menneto then went on to address Polaris’ discontinuing the Victory product line.

“How does this decision impact Indian?” he asked rhetorically. “The impact for Indian is more investments and growing the business faster.”

2018 Indian Scout Bobber

The new Indian Scout Bobber has been blacked out from the new cast aluminum wheels to the headlight nacelle and everything in between. No, really: black frame, black exhaust, black handlebars, black drop down bar-end mirrors, black gauges, you get the idea. This leads me to believe a certain Stones song from the 60s was playing on repeat in the design offices of Indian’s HQ. We see minimalistic engine covers, and louvered heat shields on the all-black exhaust adding to the fit and feel.

Sticking with the less-is-more theme Indian has gotten rid of the Scout’s center brake light for an integrated LED stop/turn/tail light and offset the license plate holder to the left side (U.S. models only). Another styling change to note is the logo on the tank. The big block letters undeniably add to the strong styling elements.

2018 Indian Scout Bobber

In true “Bobber” form the fenders front and rear have been chopped. The rear suspension has lost an inch, which brings travel down from 3.0 inches to 2.0. The front fork now features cartridge internals, which is coupled with a handlebar 1.5-inches closer to the rider. Similarly, the footpegs are moved 1.5 inches rearward, which should help lend to a sportier-handling Scout. Other than the suspension changes, the bike remains mechanically unchanged. Indian says the Bobber’s seat is 25.6 inches, which is 0.3 inch taller than the older Scout, so we surmise that it’s thicker to make extra leg-room for the rear-set footpegs. Specs state a weight loss of five pounds to a 554-pound curb weight.

Even with all that black you still get four great looking color options: the cheapest option putting MSRP at $11,499 for Thunder Black, moving to $11,999 for Star Silver Smoke, Bronze Smoke, or Indian Motorcycle Red. Finally, the Thunder Black Smoke version at $12,499, which also includes ABS. Here, smoke means it comes with a flat finish.

2018 Indian Scout Bobber

While the bike appears to be mostly cosmetic changes, we will have to wait until tomorrow’s ride to report back on handling characteristics and overall thoughts. I can say with complete seriousness that I am already daydreaming about how “badass” I am going to look on it tomorrow.

Have any questions? Leave them in the comments below and I will do my best to get answers while we have the Indian staff here with us. 

  • Sayyed Bashir

    Its not going to look too “badass” with those shiny cylinder heads. Looks more like a wannabe “badass”. One look at the 60-degree V-twin and you know its not a Harley.
    Every time Steve Menneto talks about “more investments in Indian and growing the business faster” the less I believe it. So far its only been cosmetic changes. No significant investment. More marketing gimmicks will not grow the business faster.

    • John A. Smith

      Isn’t Harley pretty much the archetype for wannabe badass, though? The same water-cooler tough guys with affected scowls who think the bike defines the man instead of the man defining himself will eat this crap up, just like they do with Harley’s offerings.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        I guess you haven’t met any real badass types, and I sincerely hope you don’t for your own sake.

        • toomanycrayons

          Seems to me some “real badass types” fight AMERICA with their grandfather’s AK-47, a beard trim, sandals and a few prayers. I don’t see motorcycle fashion in the mix. What am I missing?

          • Sayyed Bashir

            You are missing the Hells Angels, the Mongols, the Bandidos, the Highwaymen, the Outlaws, the Vagos and the Warlocks, just to mention a few.
            http://www.complex.com/sports/2014/06/10-most-dangerous-motorcycle-gangs-in-america/

          • toomanycrayons

            America doesn’t lay awake nights worrying about them. They’re not so much the ISIS/Taliban existential threat we keep hearing about, as simply an extension of the business as usual ideology which drives Wall Street/Lehman Bros., Trump Inc., etc..

            “The kind of motorcycle that kicks sand in your face and takes your girlfriend. I like it.”

            This Scout is the perfect bike for small guys with imaginary fears and a notion to suffer for them. The marketing dept. hit a home run: manufactured self-perception is everything where there is nothing else.

    • Born to Ride

      Damn, and here I thought the blacked out engine with the polished valve covers and Indian logo was one of the best styling cues on the whole bike. But now that you’ve pointed out that it defies the age old maxim of “moar black = moar badass” I guess that makes it a girls bike like the Soft-tail Dyna. Thanks for clearing that up for me man.

  • Hot Stuff

    “The rear suspension has lost an inch, which brings travel down from 3.0 inches to 2.0. ”

    Sad Trombone….

    • allworld

      Yeah I was thinking the same thing………. less weight and more suspension and perhaps a bigger fuel tank for increased range..
      I’m sure this will resonate with many riders and the new logo on the tank is better, IMO

    • TheMarvelous1310

      I was reading this like, ‘Yes! YES! Wait, what? NNNNOOOOOOOOO!’

    • Born to Ride

      I will never understand what is so fun about scraping the pegs and undercarriage of your bike trying to traverse an intersection or round-about at a normal speed. Or getting your spine folded going over railroad tracks. My California 1400 has miles of clearance under the floorboards compared to this bike and I still want for more lean angle. Sure looks good parked outside the bar tho.

    • Starmag

      That’ll widen it’s market, Harley riders don’t seem to like anything with more than 2″ of suspension travel. Who knows how much cross-over from Harley riders it could enjoy if Indian had just gone all the way back to a hard tail frame.

  • Jon Jones

    So edgy! So macho! So dark and menacing! So street! So punch-in-the-face!!!!!!

    • Starmag

      I’m pretty sure that’s sarcasm. Hilarious. Indian’s marketing dept. needs you.

      • toomanycrayons

        Targeting guys who see themselves alone, waiting, leaning against walls in empty lots wearing leather not working for you? Indian Marketing needs something. You got that right.

  • kenneth_moore

    Is the front wheel and tire the same height and width as the regular Scout? It looks fatter and taller.

    I like it. I even like the tank logo; it reminds me of HD tank logos from the 70’s, without being a direct copy. I also like the shiny heads; again because it’s reminiscent of Shovelhead engines with their unpainted heads.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      The heads look nothing like a Harley since they are fake with no cooling fins. The bike is water cooled. They look more like plastic covered with chrome.

      • Born to Ride

        He meant to say valve covers. Which were indeed unpainted on the shovelhead. I don’t understand how milled then polished aluminum remotely looks like chrome dipped plastic, but if you have to hate on a superior engine design to validate your Harley-Master-Race mentality, then so be it. Just know that you make little to no sense to anyone with a functioning temporal lobe.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Those shiny 60-degree cylinders definitely make the bike look like a Japanese cruiser instead of a menacing American bike. I didn’t say anything about the performance of the bike, just the looks and Indian trying to make it look “badass”. Obviously the performance was not enough to sell the bike.

          • Born to Ride

            How do you figure? I see tons of Scouts in the wild. Clearly it is a massive sales success for the fledgeling brand, and the only other cruiser I considered before buying my Guzzi. Also, the 45* vtwin is an archaic and inefficient design. It lacks primary balance and the narrow V-angle causes cooling issues for your precious air cooled fins, limited air box capacity, and raises the center of gravity. If you wanna argue for Harley based on their commercial success and the way they make you feel, then carry on. But don’t go blathering on about how their engines are superior in engineering or even aesthetic when the arbitrary adherence to the past becomes an engineering problem to overcome rather than propel their product forward.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            There you go – back to the performance – which I never argued against and is not even an issue. The issue is in the looks department. Trying to look “badass”. Even today’s MO ride review says “wanna-be” which is the same thing I said. Harleys don’t have to be anything. They are naturally badass. Watch the 700 biker clubs that ride Harleys. Nobody wants to mess with them.

          • Born to Ride

            Except for the local PD when they roll thru my town. Seen plenty of Vagos and Hells Angels pulled over and getting searched on the side of the freeway. Probably for no reason other than the cops wanting to shake em down for wearing colors.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Yup, so you can either make the cops happy or yourself happy. You can live like a lion or live like a mouse. I thought America was a free country. Obviously it isn’t. It is OK to want to look “badass” but not OK to be badass. So everyone should ride a Honda 50 and stop trying to look “badass”, which was my original point.

  • lennon2017

    3″ to 2″ for rear suspension on a bike that already hit its limits too often for some riders is an odd choice. (This is from someone unfamiliar with true bobber culture, but my assumption is that bobbers are almost proudly wanting for rear travel, as if the lesser is better, correct me if I’m wrong.) So in two years will Indian, Triumph and who else debut the bobber sixty and the street (twin) bobber, respectively?

    • toomanycrayons

      “3” to 2″ for rear suspension on a bike that already hit its limits too often for some riders is an odd choice.”-lennon2017

      Heavy attitude for light men?

  • Robotribe

    The ergos look horrible going by offboard eyeballs alone. My back hurts just looking at the shots of the guy actually riding. Now I know why the original models have those long swept-back bars.

  • Old MOron

    I guess Reid Wilson can tick off a delivery on his promise that Indian will be “doing new things that American motorcycle manufacturers aren’t doing right now.”

    http://www.motorcycle.com/features/mo-interview-reid-wilson-director-of-marketing-for-indian-motorcycle.html

    • Kevin Duke

      Patience, my friend. Developing a new streetbike platform takes time.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        Kevin is still hoping, unless he knows a thing or two we don’t.

      • Old MOron

        You’re right, of course. And it’s only been a few months since JB’s interview posted. But I’m going to hold these guys to their claims.

  • trvlr

    Same old shit. $200 more expensive and 33% less suspension travel on a motorcycle that didn’t have enough suspension travel to begin with. Still no follow through on Indian’s promises to do more than build the same old cruisers. The US motorcycle industry is so timid and afraid of taking chances they think a headlight nacelle is a radical change.

    • TC

      I don’t think that having shocks with about four inches of travel instead of two inches would be ‘taking chances’. WTF is Indian thinking? Just plain stupid. Figure an inch of travel lost when loaded, that would only leave one inch of travel.

  • Randy Weaver

    I am not as cynical as the other posters or is that posers? I like the look the new Bobber has. Guess we’ll have to wait to see how the rear suspension works with the lost inch. I am very hopeful Indian will be innovative and surprise us in the next few years. Of course I bought a Victory in ’99 thinking they were going to do wonders!

    • Kevin Duke

      Victory did do wonders, giving Polaris a head start on properly building Indians!

      • Sayyed Bashir

        Victory was a $100 million lesson in how to build Indians. I was worried for Harley when Victory was around. Not anymore. If one wants tradition, why not buy the real thing with much better quality, reliability and support and a continuous 114 year manufacturing history? Many people who bought Indians are going back to Harley.

        • Kevin Duke

          I’d love to see your data of the “many people” who are selling their Indians to get a Harley. Indian already sells more bikes than Victory did, so your loss of worries for Harley doesn’t make sense.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Well Victory wasn’t selling much otherwise Polaris wouldn’t have suffered a gigantic loss, so selling more than Victory doesn’t mean much. I see in all the forum comments where people don’t like the rough and heavy riding of the Indians after buying them and the fit and finish compared to Harleys. Besides they miss the social aspect of the Harley experience and don’t like the lonely Indian dealerships which are mostly populated with Polaris quads, snow mobiles, Slingshots and leftover Victorys whereas there is always something going on at Harley dealerships every weekend with hundreds of riders and rides. Victory was a performance brand and was taking sales from Harley. Indian is more of a me-too brand. People buy it because they want something different, but after buying it realize that it is not as good as a Harley and want to go back. They also don’t trust Polaris to keep supporting it if it doesn’t do well, just like they dropped Victory owners stone cold. Harley has been supporting its bikes continuously since 1903.

          • Jason

            Sales figures say otherwise. Indian sales are up, Harley sales are down.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Up and down are relative. Harley sold 260,289 bikes in 2016. How many did Indian sell? This is what I read in Twin Cities Business on Jan 24: “Profits plunged 42 percent at Polaris Industries in the fourth quarter of 2016. The company’s motorcycle segment, in particular, took a beating as profits fell 94 percent to $1.6 million. For the full fiscal 2016, Polaris saw its profits slashed in half to $213 million, down from $455 million.” Doesn’t sound too encouraging.

          • Jason

            Polaris does not report vehicle sales numbers only profit and sales percentages. Indian motorcycle sales were up 20% in the 4th quarter of 2016. That is despite them shutting down production to upgrade their paint line (to increase capacity). Polaris also spent $669 million to buy TAP and $246 million to buy back stock. (That hurts short term profits but the investment allows them to expand their business.)

            Their net cash from operations was $571 million in 2016 vs $440 million in 2015. So as a company they are making money and using it to expand their business and buy back shares (which makes every share worth more money). Sounds like a good outlook to me and Polaris stock is up 10.5% YTD in 2017 so the investors are happy.

            (Harley stock is down 10.9% YTD in 2017)

          • kenneth_moore

            Harley Davidson sales are down too. They’re laying off workers, they have excess inventory, even their sleeveless shirt and “Live to Ride” dog food bowl sales are in the crapper.

            The fact is, Indian, HD, and virtually every other motorcycle manufacturer is starved for new customers. Younger people just aren’t getting on motorcycles. For that matter a big percentage of them aren’t even interested in buying cars.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            I think BMW, Triumph, Ducati, KTM, Moto Guzzi and Aprilia are also taking away sales from HD and Indian. Tourers, adventure bikes, retros, scramblers, nakeds, sport bikes, there are so many choices available other than cruisers.

          • Born to Ride

            Moto Guzzi sells 5000-10000 bikes a year internationally. They take sales from nobody haha.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      You are the ideal customer for Polaris/Indian.

  • B.Hoop

    Higher seat to accommodate the foot pegs being moved back for better handling… sounds good to me. I think it looks pretty good. I’d take it over the Triumph bobber just on aesthetics…

  • spiff

    Not a clue what it is like to ride, but I think it looks good.

  • TheMarvelous1310

    They did two things wrong: they lowered a rear end that’s already plenty low enough, and they didn’t put the more powerful Octane engine in. Otherwise, it’s perfect! I was trying to choose between the Scout and a Street Bob, unless Dynas get 2 grand cheaper I think my choice is clear.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Money is not the only thing. Go with your heart. You will be happier. Indian dealerships are quite lonely, in case you haven’t noticed. Mostly populated with Polaris’s other offerings such as quads, snowmobiles, Slingshots and leftover Victorys.

      • c w

        Which makes sense given that Indian dealerships tend to also be Polaris dealerships…and one looking for those others things might want to see those other things.

    • Campisi

      If it makes you feel any better about that engine, even the standard Scout mill is more powerful than anything in Harley’s Twin Cam line.

      • TheMarvelous1310

        It’s not a competition, guy. I actually love Harley-Davidsons, I just want something nobody else I know has.

        • Campisi

          Why care about whether or not the Bobber has the Octane engine in it, then? You stated that you’d rather it had a more powerful engine in it, thereby denoting horsepower as a valid concern.

          • TheMarvelous1310

            I want more horsepower than either bike has, really, but since Indian doesn’t have the aftermarket that Harley-Davidson does, I wanted as much power as I could get off the top. If I can’t get the Scout to 140hp,I might get a Dyna or a used V-Rod anyway… Never a Sportster, I’m too big to look right on one. Might as well buy another CCW Heist at that point.

          • spiff

            Skip the V-Rod. Two different guys have told me, one a club racer and the other who is a Harley guy, were not happy with the handling. If you are going to leave the concert jungle bar hop look elsewhere.

          • Rob Alexander

            I’ve ridden a couple and they handle like shit, IMHO. I wasn’t overly impressed with the engine either, definitely not enough to put up with the rest of the bike.

          • spiff

            Don’t know the specifics between the octane and scout, but I would start with these guys.
            https://youtu.be/-t9J112lhf0

          • Campisi

            Have you thought about giving the XDiavel a try? It’s a bit of a departure from bikes like Scouts and Street Glides, but then again so is a V-Rod.

          • TheMarvelous1310

            Nope. I’m scared the xDiavel will ruin me for other cruisers, and I can’t afford a new one.

        • Motonut_1

          Honda?

          • TheMarvelous1310

            Zzzzzzzzz-huh?

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Many people who bought Indians are going back to Harleys. You don’t know what you have until you don’t have it anymore.

      • Always Right

        Only in HP, Torque is off the charts with HD ….I ride the Softail slim this bike is aiming to compete with nice try but nah !

    • Rob Alexander

      As a Scout owner (and former Victory owner, so I’m not biased) and someone who’s read most or all of the reviews on both bikes, I get the impression that while slightly more powerful, the Victory version of the engine was just not as refined and smooth as the Scout’s. That’s a bigger deal to me than 4 HP on a bike that’s already the fastest in its class.

      • TheMarvelous1310

        Fair point! But this is not as refined and smooth an Indian as usual, either… Do you think the suspension drop will hurt the ride quality? Somebody said that if the center of gravity was lowered it might not need as much suspension.

        • Rob Alexander

          Hmmmmm. I don’t see how it couldn’t hurt it. 3″ is already pretty short and it will bottom if you hit a big bump hard. The Scout has a crap suspension (cheap) so you could probably make up for it somewhat with high quality shocks.

  • SRMark

    Good bike to ride with a dumb-ass helmet.

  • Josh

    looks good but riding position seems cramped

  • BDan75

    Not digging the rear suspension trim, but at least the bike doesn’t look, umm, “unusual,” like a certain British bobber (IMO).

  • mog

    Best 1/4 ton Scout yet.
    Now about the engine,
    any horsepower numbers?

    • toomanycrayons

      And, is it faster in the 1/4 than a Honda CB1100EX? Excitable people wanna know:

      https://disqus.com/home/discussion/motorcycleblog/2017_honda_cb1100ex_review/#comment-3417396190

      • Rob Alexander

        You really should consider a hobby for all your idle time… I mean besides being an internet troll.

        • toomanycrayons

          How about yourself?

          You’ve just had a run-in with your primitive emotional algorithm and you didn’t much like it. It’s not my fault your “investment” in the Scout is problematic for you. Ride it more. It doesn’t matter how it compares. Delusions ‘R America: Kellyanne said so.

          Truth be told, if you’re not this…adequate, it doesn’t much matter, anyway:

          https://www.bikepics.com/pictures/299439/1939-indian-scout

          • Rob Alexander

            Jeezus, I could tell you were a flaming liberal, something about the pseudo-intellectual persona and having nothing more rewarding in life (like a job, perhaps) than sitting on your 300 lb ass in mom’s basement pretending to be smarter than other people on the internet. I have 11K miles on mine since November, it gets ridden plenty, thanks. Go get a life, troll.

          • toomanycrayons

            “Jeezus, I could tell you were a flaming liberal, something about the pseudo-intellectual persona and having nothing more rewarding in life (like a job, perhaps) than sitting on your 300 lb ass in mom’s basement pretending to be smarter than other people on the internet. I have 11K miles on mine since November, it gets ridden plenty, thanks. Go get a life, troll.”-Rob Alexander

            Who’s pretending? Thanks, for another laugh track.

            Your…300 lb ass gets ridden plenty? Ouch.

    • Kevin Duke

      Same as before, so expect about 83 horses at the rear wheel.

    • Rob Alexander

      Look up the reviews on the standard Scout (not the 60), it should be the same as that – so anywhere from low 80’s to low 90’s peak depending on whose dyno – but the numbers don’t tell the whole story of how flexible this engine is in the real world, it’ll go down to just over 2K RPM in top gear happily and torque away (try this on a Ducati or KTM twin haha), while winding up to a nice top end hit at high RPM (not quite in the Ducati/KTM class but outstanding for a cruiser). It’s a bike on which you can generally not worry much about gear selection, IMO.

  • hawkrider88

    I’m not a cruiser kinda guy but I really like the looks of this one. However losing an inch of rear travel is a crummy move. But I’m thinking if it weighs less than 450 lbs, maybe it’s OK. Now I see the weight is 554. 554! Nice to look at, but I want some road feel, feedback and at least a tiny bit of flick-ability. Too heavy for me.

    • Rob Alexander

      Have you ridden a Scout? Indian does demo days frequently, you should hop a ride on one. I can assure you, it feels like closer to 400 lbs from the saddle, closer in feel to my 690 SMR (350 lbs) than my 990 SMT (~500) for comparison (and the 990 is NEVER criticized for lacking agility). The only thing I’d score against it is crappy stock tires (fixable) and insufficient steering lock angle at very low speeds.

      • Jason

        I rented a Scout last week for a day. Points against: Very limited lean angle and suspension travel. I bottomed the suspension multiple times and even when it didn’t bottom the feet forward riding position made me sit on my tailbone and even small bumps sent shocks up my spine. Points for: Excellent engine

        However it wasn’t as bad as the Indian Chieftain my wife I rented for 4 days. That bike was so uncomfortable that we didn’t ride the 3 day of the trip because our backs were so sore. The suspension on that bike also bottomed out routinely. (I’m 190 lbs my wife is 130 lbs. We had maybe 20 lbs of clothes in the saddle bags) My back hurt for more than a month after that trip.

        • Rob Alexander

          Dude, you must be a lean angle junkie (or not be leaning your body properly, but we’ll go with the former)… I don’t have any problem with lean angle and even the magazine guys (who are generally 10x faster through corners than us mere mortals) listed its lean angle as a plus. I found the Chieftain very comfortable and the Chief hurt my back – different strokes I guess, I wonder if people screwed with the suspension settings on the rental bikes? I know the Scout is stiff for a lot of lightweight woman riders – my ex gf who I bought the Scout from had her preload adjusted all the way out for example – that would affect you (and me – I’m around 195) in the form of bottoming out more frequently. Might not be a bad idea to hit a demo day to confirm?

          Or if that’s you in your avatar pic, maybe a 990 SMT or 1290 Duke GT is more your style for touring? LOL 😀

          • Jason

            Lean angle junkie? No my sportbike riding (and treating public roads like a race track) days are behind me. Today I’m just a middle-aged guy with a touring bike that likes to go moderately quick on some curvy roads.

            The Scout has an unladen max lean angle of only 31 degrees and the Bobber version is reduced to 29 degrees. For comparison a Harley Road King has 32 degrees, a Goldwing 42 degrees, and Sportbikes 50 to 55 degrees.

            The 990 SMT is nice but my wife just laughed when she looked at the passenger accommodations. We ended up with a lightly used BMW R1200RT.

          • Kevin Duke

            And this exemplifies why we discuss lean angle clearance in our reviews, as one rider’s extreme can be another rider’s moderate.

          • Jason

            No. You do not give corning clearance or discuss lean angle in any kind of subjective manner in your reviews. Why would you even make that claim?

            Of the reviews on the home page now…

            Yamaha Venture review:
            No lean angle spec
            In the article: “You’re going at a pretty good pace when the floorboards start throwing sparks.”

            The BMW R nine T review:
            No lean angle spec
            In the article: Nothing

            Honda CB1100EX review:
            No lean angle spec
            In the article: “the footpegs that will drag if ridden aggressively.”

          • Kevin Duke

            Actually, it’s precisely in a “subjective” manner in which cornering clearance is discussed on MO. It’s seldom than OEMs provide lean angle clearance (HD being a surprisingly notable exception), so it’s not often we can provide “objective” numbers. Anyway, I made mention of this because a commenter on our CB1100 review complained that we noted the CB’s clearance when, according to him, no one in the market for a CB cares about sporting performance and lean angle.

          • Jason

            Your comment above that one person’s extreme can be another person’s moderate lean angle is a perfect example why subjective statements like “”the footpegs that will drag if ridden aggressively.” are useless. What is aggressive?

            So what if OEM’s don’t provide lean angle specs. This may surprise you but there was a time in the not too distant past that motorcycle magazines didn’t just republish specs from manufacturers. They actually took test bikes and did their own measurements. They measured ergonomic things like seat height, legroom, reach to the bars on every bike they tested so potential buyers had objective measurements to compare bikes. They also testing things like 0-30, 0-60, 1/4 mile, 60-0 braking, top speed, top gear roll-on at different speeds. They did journalism. That journalism was important because, as as an example, we found that pretty much every manufacturer lied about how much their bikes weighed.

            Unladen lean angle is incredibly easy to measure. All it requires is the bike to be on a flat surface and then you take a large flat sheet (like a sheet of plywood) put it against the tires and then lift the outside edge until it touches something on the bike. Measure the angle and you are done. We are talking MAYBE 10 minutes of work.

  • Kevin Duke
  • Rob Alexander

    Hmmmm, they went in the opposite direction from what I want. Although it IS nice to look at, I was hoping for a premium suspension model and/or maybe one with some (factory) day-to-day practicality upgrades. I own a regular Scout and put Viking locking hard bags on it and added the windshield and passenger seat and pegs and backrest. Now I have a sporty-cruiser-bagger that outruns and out-handles anything from a factory in the bagger class, while not giving up too much in comfort (especially if engine heat output is taken into account, and I live in AZ so this is a big deal). Next up, Traxxion Dynamics fork and Dark Scout rear suspension. (BTW, put decent tires on your Scout for a big handling and overall feel upgrade. Any modern premium cruiser tire from Pirelli, Michelin or Bridgestone should help a lot.)

    But I totally get it… it’s the market and Indian is probably looking at big picture sales and not just me. Looks are king in this market,

  • bea ware

    Are you assuming we al follow Indian enough to already know engine and performance details or is this bike only about retro style and black paint for the penis extension crowd?