Remember back in 2013 when Indian Motorcycle relaunched with just three models? Well, a lot has happened in just a few short years. Today, Indian revealed its 2018 lineup, with the addition of a Roadmaster Elite and a Springfield Dark Horse for 2018. With the Indian Scout Bobber that we recently tested, Indian has 16 models in its latest catalog. The rest of the 2018 Indian model line receives tweaks and updates for the upcoming model year.

“The Roadmaster Elite and Springfield Dark Horse are two fantastic motorcycles, with two different attitudes,” said Reid Wilson, Marketing Director – Indian Motorcycle. “The Roadmaster Elite packs all the bells and whistles perfect for riders looking for the best of the best, while the Dark Horse brings blacked-out style to the Springfield line. Beyond these two offerings, we have elevated each and every model – listening to our consumers to bring new features and colors they have asked for.”

Whichever Indian model you may be interested in, you can see them in person starting in September at your local Indian dealer.

2018 Indian Roadmaster Elite

2018 Indian Roadmaster Elite

Roadmaster Line

The Roadmaster Elite joins the other masters of the highway as a limited-production model featuring two-tone candy paint that is finished by hand, with 23K gold leaf badging on the tank and lowers – a process that takes 30 hours to complete. Commensurate with its status, the Elite wears billet aluminum floorboards for both passenger and rider, passenger armrests, a premium touring console, and pinnacle mirrors – along with all the standard amenities you’d expect from a Roadmaster, like a 300-watt premium audio system. The Roadmaster Elite has a $36,999 MSRP.

Filling out the Roadmaster line, the Roadmaster Classic returns with a $26,999 MSRP in Indian Motorcycle Red and Willow Green over Ivory Cream. The Roadmaster retails for $28,999 and gains three new colors: Burgundy Metallic, which receives desert tan genuine leather, Polished Bronze over Thunder Black and Pearl White over Star Silver.

2018 Indian Chieftain Classic

2018 Indian Chieftain Classic

Chieftain Line

The Chieftain model line gains a new model, the Chieftain Classic model, that features the brand’s valanced front fender and genuine leather seat with fringe, in three colors, including Indian Motorcycle Red, Thunder Black Pearl and Star Silver Smoke for a $23,999 MSRP. The Chieftain receives a lowered price of $21,499 and also sports a 19-inch blacked-out 10-spoke wheel and open fender as standard with the Steel Gray paint. The Chieftain Limited, starting at $24,499, adds three new colors: Thunder Black Pearl, Blue Fire and Bronze Smoke.

2018 Indian Springfield Dark Horse

2018 Indian Springfield Dark Horse

Springfield Line

For riders who like their baggers with quick-release windshields, the $20,999 Springfield Dark Horse delivers tons of attitude wrapped in matte black paint with gloss black details. The Dark Horse sports a new 19-inch 10-spoke, blacked-out front wheel and open fender to show off the hoop. This wheel and fender are also available as accessory items for Roadmaster, Roadmaster Classic, Chieftain, and Springfield lines.

The Springfield returns for 2018 with a new color combination, Metallic Jade over Thunder Black, added to the Thunder Black and Steel Gray over Burgundy Metallic options. The Springfield’s MSRP is also $20,999.

2018 Indian Chief Classic

2018 Indian Chief Classic

Chief Line

The Indian Chief Classic gains whitewall tires, wire wheels and chrome hand controls. Available in Burgundy Metallic, the Classic retails for $19,499. The $19,999 Chief Vintage receives its share of new touches in the form of black leather saddlebags and seats with Thunder Black and Star Silver over Thunder Black paint choices.

2018 Indian Scout

2018 Indian Scout

Scout Line

The big news for the Scout line (other than the all-new Bobber) is the addition of a cartridge fork on the Scout. Additionally, the Scout receives Pirelli tires and – most importantly for some riders – passenger accommodations in the form of a leather pillion and pegs. Finally, the $11,499 Scout also gains two new colors: Metallic Jade and Willow Green over Ivory Cream. The Scout Sixty, starting at $8,999, receives two new colors, including Polished Bronze and Thunder Black over Titanium Metallic.

  • DickRuble

    Hough!.. I mean how interesting… with such a lineup no wonder sales dropped 13%..

    • Sayyed Bashir

      For once I agree with you. To be fair, Indian sales rose 17% (whatever that means) but were crushed by tanking Slingshot sales. The bikes look fantastic. I don’t know about the actual ride quality, shifting, fit and finish, or the dealer experience. I tried the Scout at the IMS in LA two years ago and was disappointed. Kept looking for a sixth gear. Didn’t ride as nice as my Harley Softail.

      • Auphliam

        I’ve test ridden the big Injuns at various demo events. I thought the ride quality, as well as mechanical performance, were spot on. Oddly enough, I did not experience (or notice) the heat everybody complains about. There were some fit and finish issues – loose windshield on a Chieftain, worn out leather on a few seats, etc. – but I suppose alot of that could be attributed to them being demo bikes making the Tour around to various dealers (ie: they’ve seen more ass than Jon Bon Jovi)

        • Max Wellian

          I rode my Vic Cross Roads 250 miles to do an Indian demo ride when they first came out. I was fine when I got there. After 10 minutes on the Chief, I was starting for feel monkey butt and my right leg was on fire. Also kept banging the dern thing off the rev limiter.
          Was very happy to get back on the Vic and do the 250 miles home. Couldn’t believe they wanted more money for that thing. The seat was already looked shot and they’d only been on the road for a couple weeks at that point.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            The Victory was a much better bike than the Indians. This comment is from Jason who has been following me around, rebutting my criticism of Polaris for not releasing Indian sales numbers: “My wife and I have done three 2-week tours in Europe on various models of the BMW R1200GS. Six to 12 hour days and not (much) complaining about comfort from my wife. This past spring we rented an Indian Chieftain for 4 days and we both couldn’t wait to get off the thing. An hour was too long. Both rider and passenger have their legs too far forward to be able to raise up to absorb bumps and the bike has limited suspension travel. That sends every bump right up the spine. We actually skipped riding the 3rd day because our backs were so sore.”

  • Lance H

    Indian isn’t even an option yet in my mind. As a cross-country touring rider, I want to have dealerships (much) closer than 500 miles away in case of any trouble, and that’s not going to be the case, yet, with Indian.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      Its a chicken and egg thing. More bikes sold = more dealerships (and vice versa). If a bike is reliable, you don’t need dealerships in every town. You just need one close to home for regular maintenance.

      • Max Wellian

        Won’t do much for you if a belt snaps or tire blows.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          I have 156,000 miles on my Harley with the original belt with no adjustment or maintenance required. If you are on a cross country trip, carry a small tire plugger kit for tubeless tires which includes the pump. Takes 5 minutes without taking the tire off the bike.

      • Lance H

        So far I’ve not needed one close while I’m on the road in the middle of nowhere, thank goodness. I’d like Indian to do well and expand their dealerships…competition is always good and would serve to push both companies to make better products at lower prices.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Lower prices may not happen because both are premium brands. In the eye of the beholder, the higher the price of the bike, the higher the quality. That is why Harley riders don’t pay any attention to Japanese bike riders.

          • Lance H

            Maybe not, but no matter how you slice it, competition is good for consumers. And as far as quality goes, I don’t know that HD or Indian has a monopoly there; I’ve had a couple of Yamahas and they’re rock-solid.

          • CFLAP

            Not many owners of Japanese bikes would agree with you. Including me. Japanese bikes have been ahead of Harley in quality for some time and for half the price. Kawasaki had Hydraulic lifters and counter balancers before Harley ever heard of them. Harley never has had shaft drive or real liquid cooling. Seems the only thing high priced about Harleys is their marketing BS. I would put my Suzuki 109 engine against a Harley any time.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            I didn’t say Harleys were better than Japanese bikes. I said Harley riders don’t care much for Japanese bike riders.

    • Gary Latessa

      BMW riders do it all the time, and I never hear that kind of lame excuse. there are almost 200 dealers. that is more than enough.

  • Old MOron

    http://www.motorcycle.com/features/mo-interview-reid-wilson-director-of-marketing-for-indian-motorcycle.html
    “new bikes – outside of cruiser/bagger/touring, all within the next two to three years”

    I guess we can rule out 2018. Maybe 2019 or 2020.

    • denchung

      It’s a bit soon to draw that conclusion. Not saying you’re wrong necessarily, but this is the time of year where returning models are announced, with new motorcycles coming as we approach the fall. The models that do get announced in the summer tend to be cruisers and tourers anyway (like the recently launched Yamaha Star Venture).

      • Old MOron

        And since he said “the next two to three years,” I shouldn’t expect 2018, which would be only one year. Alright, I’m keeping the MOronic faith.

        • Sayyed Bashir

          What bike do you want from Indian that no one else is making?

          • Old MOron

            Oh, how about a Super Scout R? A Super Chief GT? A Scout Tuono? And most of all, an FTR 750 roadster/street tracker/sport.

          • Douglas

            How about a Roadmaster w/o those goofy-asst valanced fenders? For those who must have the 30’s or 40’s look, there should be plenty good used ones current owners would trade/sell after they got their new ones, with the Chieftain Elite style fenders…..I’d think.

          • David Kraft

            I dig Indian’s very much just not enough to buy one. I have had 9 bikes including a Kawasaki KLR that I rode 53,000 miles. Now I prefer my Honda CBR as my every day commuter.

          • David Kraft

            I like the fenders as they are unique Indian, but overall give me the Scout!

          • Sayyed Bashir

            You want Italian bikes from Indian? Why not buy the Italian bikes which already exist and let Indian do whatever they want to do? The FTR 750 will be converted into a Scout 45 before it is released for street use.

          • Old MOron

            Why not buy the Italian bikes? Because Indian has promised “new bikes – outside of cruiser/bagger/touring”. And if they make something sporty, I would be happy to buy it from them.

            As for letting Indian do whatever they want to do, hey, it was their idea to do new bikes outside of cruiser/bagger/touring.

          • DickRuble
          • Sayyed Bashir

            What is it?

          • DickRuble
  • Martin

    I agree with others. The line up looks booooring. Two bikes too many ways and nothing more. I am looking for a new touring bike. Until they fix rear cylinder heat problem on Roadmasters, I am not touching that thing. I am not a Harley fan, but after riding HD Ultra Limited, it is a gold standard in touring. At 10 mph, 30 mph or what ever mph, there is no heat from rear cylinder. You can flick it, gun it or cruise in it, a new transmission and engine never misses the beat. Polaris needs to put same type of cylinder head cooling in their Indians as HD has it. It works like a charm. Also, my local Polaris dealer does nothing for its riders, but a local HD dealer throws a huge party every month. After Polaris shut my Victory down, it is getting harder and harder to look at their Indians as attractive.

    • Sayyed Bashir

      At least somebody gets it.

  • Craig Hoffman

    The Scout line is kinda cool, but the big Indians look like something from Roger Rabbit’s Toontown…

  • Auphliam

    Overall, some nice refinements to the lineup. The whitewalls look good on the Classic, and I’m glad to see them keeping the Indian red on a couple models. That new Jade Green/Black combo looks pretty good on the Springfield, too. I’m tiring of the whole ‘Dark Horse’ thing, but I guess it must be making them money.

    Disappointed in the Roadmaster Elite. I think they’re going to have a hard time pushing those for $37K without as much as a Stage 1 upgrade. When you’re dropping that kind of dough for one of these barges, you don’t expect to have to pay extra for cams, aircleaner and pipes. If you’re going to consign yourself to chasing Harley, at least pay attention to what they put in to their premium (re CVO) models.

  • LS650

    16 models? I see 16 variants of just 2 models. C’mon, let’s not exaggerate.

    • TC

      Same song and dance as Harley. New Paint! Whitewall tires! In the off road motorcycle world it was known as Bold New Graphics!

  • TheMarvelous1310

    They need an in-between model… They should remake the Judge with the 111 engine and Octane styling, call it the Indian Brave, and go Dyna hunting!