2010 Ural T 750

2010 Ural T 750 pictures, prices, information, and specifications.
MSRP
$9,999
Type
Touring
Insurance
Compare with the 2021 Ural GEO LE 2021 Ural GEO LE
Model Type
Touring
MSRP
$9,999
Dealers
Warranty
24
Insurance
Finance
Generic Type (Primary)
Touring
Manufacturer Country
Russia
Introduction Year
2010
Parent Company
Ural
Display Name
T 750
Year
2010
Make
Ural
Engine Type
Horizontally Opposed
Cylinders
2
Engine Stroke
4-Stroke
Horsepower (bhp/kW)
40 / 29.8
Horsepower RPM
5600
Torque (Ft Lbs/Nm)
38 / 52
Torque RPM
4000
Cooling
Air
Valves
4
Valves Per Cylinder
2
Valve Configuration
OHV
Bore (mm/in)
78 / 3.07
Stroke (mm/in)
78 / 3.07
Displacement (cc/ci)
749 / 45.7
Compression Ratio
8.6:1
Starter
Electric / Kick
Fuel Requirements
Premium
Fuel Type
Gas
Carburetion Brand
Keihin
Fuel Injector
No
Carburetor
Yes
Number Of Carburetors
2
Carburetor Size (mm)
22
Carburetion Type
Carburetor
Speed Governor
No
Transmission Type
Manual
Number Of Speeds
4
Overdrive
No
Primary Drive (Rear Wheel)
Shaft
Reverse
Yes
Wheels Composition
Steel
Tube / Tubeless
Tubed
Chromed
Yes
Front Wheel Diameter
19
Rear Wheel Diameter
19
Front Tire (Full Spec)
4 X 19
Rear Tire (Full Spec)
4 X 19
Spare Tire
Standard
Brake Brand Name
Brembo(R)
Front Brake Type
Disc
Rear Brake Type
Drum
Front Suspension Type
Leading Link Fork
Front Adjustable Fork Pre-Load
No
Front Adjustable Rebound Damping
No
Front Central Suspension Strut
No
Front Suspension Brand Name
Sachs
Steering Damper
Yes
Rear Suspension Type
Twin Sided Swing Arm
Rear Adjustable Shock / Spring Pre-Load
Yes
Rear Adjustable Rebound Damping
No
Number Rear Shock Absorbers
2
Rear Suspension Brand Name
Sachs
Rear Suspension Material
Steel
Air Adjustable
No
Steering Control
Handlebar
Length (ft)
8.47
Width (in/mm)
66.9 / 1700
Height (in/mm)
43.3 / 1100
Wheelbase (in/mm)
58 / 1470
Ground Clearance (in/mm)
4.9 / 125
Length (ft/ft)
8
Length (ft/in)
5.6
Dry Weight (lbs/kg)
705 / 320
GVWR (lbs/kgs)
1344 / 609.6
Fuel Capacity (gal/l)
5 / 19
Fuel Capacity Reserve (gal/l)
0.5 / 2
Engine Displacement to Weight (cc)
1.09
Seat Type
Two-Piece
Adjustable
No
Seat Material
Vinyl
Seat Location
Driver / Passenger / Sidecar
Folding
No
Seat Height (in/mm)
32 / 813
Number Of Seats
3
Grab Rail or Strap
Standard
Detachable
No
Frame
Steel
Hand Grips
Standard
Foot Peg Location
Driver and Passenger
Adjustable
No
Chain Guard
No
Engine Case Guard
Yes
Fork Guards
No
Saddle Bag Guard
No
Tank Guard
No
Hand Guards
No
Brush Guard
No
Heel Guards
No
Exterior Covers
Standard
Front Fender
Standard
Front Fender Rail
Standard
Rear Fender
Standard
Top Crown
Standard
Handlebars
Standard
License Plate
Standard
Trip Odometer
Standard
Speedometer
Standard
Warranty (Months/Condition)
24 / Limited
Battery Warranty (Months)
0
Metallic
No
Adjustable Levers
Standard
Folding
Yes
Helmet Storage
Standard
Sidecar Rear Rack
Standard
Sidecar Trunk
Standard
Headlight Mounts
Standard
Halogen Headlight (s)
Standard
Headlight (s)
Standard
Light Type
Halogen
User Reviews
1 review
  • 2010 Ural-T, a realistic owners' review...
    By  (I am an Owner) on Dec 17, 2010

    Greetings,

    After over 40 years of riding various motorcycles, with and without sidecars, and after extended research of the Ural, I finally felt confident in their quality to purchase a 2010 Ural-T.

    I've tracked the development of these rigs since 1989, when I first viewed one ...

    You can read about the latest improvements to these machines in other reviews. The fact Ural has incorporated many "proven" components and improved the overall production of these rigs speaks very positively. With that said, there are some factors any potential buyer should consider.

    The Ural boxer engine runs quite well, considering the dated design. If you are willing to learn how to perform your own routine maintenance(fluid changes, carburator balancing and valve adjustments), you will be fine. Ural has a CD which explains routine maintenance quite well.

    You should also consider the Ural limitations in performance; again, this is directly related to the 1939 design. I've taken the time to carefully perform the "break-in" according to factory requirements. Slow and easy the first 1000kms/600miles. After the first service(recommended to be performed by the dealership), you are able to ride the rig more aggressively. However, it's important to explain, you are still basically working all the moving parts so they "seat" properly. The more you ride your rig, the better is shifts and runs.

    The overall comfort level is somewhat difficult to quantify. I'm 6'1" at 230 pounds. I found the tractor style seat to be comfortable enough, yet too low and too close to the fuel tank. I installed two short lengths of 1X1 inch holed box tubing which allowed me to move the seat up an inch, and back about an inch and a half. I'm in a more ergonomically relaxed riding position now. Possibly the stepped bench seat would be better?

    The sidecar is very comfortable. I installed a "brooklands style" windscreen vice the stock windscreen for two reasons. The stock windscreen is too large and induces a lot of wind resistance. Plus there is a significant amount of "air blast" on the rider. The Brooklands provides enough passenger comfort and can be folded down when not needed. With the optional spare tire, mount and luggage rack, there is plenty of storage space inside the trunk and on the rack for touring.

    I now have 4500kms/2700miles on my rig. I can cruise comfortably at 60-65mph on level ground and get approximately 32mpg using 93 octane fuel. However, with a passenger you will find pulling long grades will slow you down to around 45-50mph, depending on the percentage of grade, and distance. The rig is most comfortable cruising 55-60mph; it just feels happier.

    There are some "quirks" which you will have to learn to work with. These rigs don't have the best braking, so you need to be careful at higher speeds; always anticipate longer stopping distances. Shifting is difficult to do without a "clunking" noise. With practice and miles riden, shifting becomes easier, but it's still "clunky". Like any motorcycle transmission with straight cut gears, if you wind it up, then hesitate before shifting, it's easier.

    I installed a small bug screen on the bike to keep the wind blast off my chest, plus I didn't want the wind resistance of a larger windshield. Riding without a windshield puts a lot of pressure on your chest at higher speeds. However, this windshield is easy to remove; something to consider if you intend to ride off road. I can take my windshield off and stow it in the sidecar.

    I encountered three minor issues within the first few miles. The turn signal switch ground wire came lose; I simply disassembled the switch and resoldered the connection. I also had sidecar signal bulbs which quit functioning. I pulled the lenses and applied electrical grease to the sockets and bent the bottom tabs out to increase the contact pressure on the base of the bulbs. I also had to epoxie glue both light lenses on the sidecar together; they broke when I removed them. The plastic is very thin and brittle requiring extreme caution when tightening the mounting screws. So far, all these repairs have been successful. I also adjusted the slow speed idle jets on both carburators; this is common and an easy adjustment. This adjustment will all but eliminate the "popping" when the engine is cold. Once the engine reaches it's normal operating temperature, the popping goes away. I also found all wheels and tires were somewhat out of balance; again, an easy fix.

    I am very pleased with the Ural-T. A sidecar rig offers stability for those desiring to participate in motorcycling where they would otherwise feel "challenged" on just two wheels. Once you acquire the skills to handle a sidecar rig, it's a safe and fun ride. I also like the utility of being able to carry a passenger in the sidecar vice behind me. The passenger has a better field of vision, and they are certainly more comfortable. The "retro" styling of the Ural-T has it's own appeal; Ural owners' are well acquainted with the "UDF" syndrone. Ural-Delay-Factor means everytime you stop for any reason where other people are around, you will be inundated with questions and requests to be given a ride. You have to be prepared to take your time riding, as well as stopping. Riding at slower speeds also has it's unique attributes. Instead of seeing how briskly you can take to the road, you find yourself enjoying a more relaxed riding style without the stress of worrying about "tickets" and "debri" in the road. If you encounter sand or gravel, you just drive through; you don't have to worry about dropping the bike. U-turns are a snap. You're also more visible, so other riders' and vehicle drivers' can see you. With the exception of interstate speeds, you can maintain most secondary speed limits without much difficulty. Of course, long steep grades will slow you down, but they won't stop you! If you decide to go off-road, you can with confidence. The ground clearance and narrow tires will get through most off-road conditions such as fire trails and other relatively well traveled dirt/gravel roads. If you have a flat, you can easily change the tire by simply swapping the sidecar or rear driver wheel with the spare mounted on the sidecar. If you have a flat with the front, you'll have to either repair it on the side of the road, or take it in to get fixed. The front wheel is fitted with a disc brake, the other wheels are drum brakes and are not interchangeable.

    I can keep my Ural-T for many years, when riding a two wheeled motorcycle will become too difficult and unsafe, as I grow older. And the "fun factor" coupled with the "comfort level" is just hard to duplicate.

    Read More