Following on the heels of the recently updated Superveloce range for 2021, MV Agusta has now announced a refresh for the Turismo Veloce family, which includes the Turismo Veloce Lusso, Lusso SCS, RC SCS, and Rosso. MV’s take on a sport-touring motorcycle, the updated 2021 range is more of an evolution of the family rather than a revolution – spurred primarily by the need to keep up with Euro 5 emission standards.

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As we know, though, whenever an OEM updates a model, it doesn’t turn its attention to only one area. The overall package gets updates where needed, and the Turismo Veloce is no exception. These updates focus on emission compliance, sure, but also safety and comfort for both rider and passenger, whether traveling short distances or far. Now, let’s run down the list of changes to the 2021 MV Agusta Turismo Veloce.

Engine

We start where we usually do, with the engine. It’s the familiar 798cc inline-Triple with counter-rotating crankshaft shared across a variety of models within MV’s range. In Turismo Veloce trim, it gets new intake trumpets for better low-end and mid-range power compared to the other 800s in the family, since this is the area most riders will be spending their time. In fact, where the Superveloce makes 148 horsepower (claimed), the Turismo Veloce sees a peak of 110 horses (also claimed). However, the T-V’s torque curve is fatter, and there’s a 12% torque increase between 3000-6000 rpm compared to the previous model. The gearbox gets revised ratios for lower revs while cruising, too. While MV don’t state as much, the lower revs, theoretically, should reduce vibration at the bars and help maximize fuel mileage – obviously two areas of big importance to touring riders.

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From there, the Triple gets the same engine updates as the Superveloce (and in fact all 2021 MV 800 three-cylinders). This means DLC-coated valve tappets, sintered valve guides, a redesigned exhaust, and new fuel injectors with 0.5 bar more pressure (from 3.5 to 4 bar). The updated clutch and clutch basket are more robust to handle the increased torque, and the EAS 3.0 quickshifter offers smoother clutchless shifts in both directions.

There are lots of changes you can’t see, but the result of MV’s Euro 5 tweaking should be a healthy bump in mid-range power.

The bottom end of the engine sees new crankshaft main bearings, piston rod bearings, and countershaft bearings. Again, to reduce friction. These aren’t changes the rider will necessarily feel, but reduced friction leads to longer service intervals, or at the very least, a more reliable engine. At least, that’s the thought. MV plans to put the theory to the test on June 21st, as it will use the new Turismo Veloce to attempt to travel 1900 km (or more) in 24 hours, with the goal of crossing 11 European countries, starting in Sweden then heading through Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, France, Lichtenstein, Austria, Switzerland, and ultimately ending up in MV’s HQ in Italy.

IMU/Electronics

If you’ve read the 2021 Superveloce story, then you won’t be surprised to learn that MV has updated the Turismo Veloce with the e-Novia 6-axis IMU. With it comes the ability to have Cornering-ABS and lean-sensitive traction control. Aside from the rider aids, the rider is also greeted to a 5.5-inch TFT display with all the pertinent information in clear view.

Cruise control!

MV has really upped its game when it comes to connectivity between the rider and the bike, and the Turismo Veloce continues this theme with the integration of the MV Ride app that can record and share your ride route. Connecting the user’s phone to the motorcycle via Bluetooth, the TFT screen can then mirror the phone’s functions or interface with the bike’s engine output and electronic controls and allow you to alter settings if you want.

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Choosing to use the screen as a mirror gives you the option to display turn-by-turn navigation – a handy feature especially on a sport-touring bike. Similarly, the Turismo Veloce family all are equipped with a satellite tracker, so in the unfortunate event your bike gets stolen, you can find it anywhere in the world… and then administer justice.

Other Odds and Ends

On all but the Rosso model (more on that in a minute), you’ll find a semi-active suspension from Sachs, with new (undisclosed) settings. Equally as important is the new seat that sits 0.7-inch (20 mm) lower than before while carrying more seat foam to provide greater comfort during long stretches. Combined with the lower seat height is a taller windscreen, protecting the rider from the wind by putting them into a greater bubble.

The seat’s lower and has more foam. That’s a win-win.

As the Turismo Veloce is a sport-touring machine after all, the tail of the bike comes ready to accept side panniers and top case (standard on both SCS models, optional on the others) all of which were designed in conjunction with the bike to maintain the style MV is so well known for. Better still, both side cases are of equal capacity, since there’s no exhaust routing one of the cases has to sacrifice space for.

Turismo Veloce SCS

We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention the two variants that are available with the SCS, or Smart Clutch System – the Turismo Veloce Lusso SCS and the Turismo Veloce RC SCS. Dirt riders are likely familiar with Rekluse, who partnered with MV to design the Smart Clutch System. Designed to basically make the clutch a redundant feature, the SCS allows riders to never need the clutch lever, even at a stop. You shift gears like normal, but don’t have to worry about stalling the bike if the revs drop too low. Your MO staff would still rather have the clutch lever, but we can see where the usefulness of the system can be handy on a sport-tourer.

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And what’s the difference between the Lusso and RC, you ask? Mainly graphics, and the fact the RC (Reparto Corsa, MV’s racing division) is numbered to 1500 units.

Turismo Veloce Rosso

The more affordable option in the Turismo Veloce line (though US pricing hasn’t been announced as of press time), the Turismo Veloce Rosso is available in any color you want – as long as it’s red.

The same engine and electronic updates the rest of the T-V line sees can also be found on the Rosso. The major difference being the Rosso gets analog suspension versus the semi-active pieces found on the other models. For riders looking for the simplicity of analog suspension, this might be a good thing. A 43mm Marzocchi fork sits out front and a Sachs shock is in the rear. Both are adjustable for rebound, compression, and spring preload. Otherwise, the Rosso cheaps out by omitting the center stand, heated grips, and satellite tracker the others come with.

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Sport-Touring In Style

While the changes to the Turismo Veloce lineup aren’t significant, meeting Euro 5 compliance takes more effort than the general public gives an OEM credit for. So for MV to take this opportunity to further refine the T-V package while they were at it is commendable.

Granted, it’s been a while since I last rode a Turismo Veloce, but these revisions have us itching to give another one a try to see if the ride really is more comfortable. One thing we didn’t see mentioned was a change in fuel capacity, but at a claimed 5.7 US gallons, that’s a respectable amount for the category. We’ll have more on the 2021 MV Agusta Turismo Veloce once we have a chance to throw a leg over it. 

For now, bask in the immense photo gallery below.


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