At EICMA last fall, Yamaha introduced the Niken GT, a sport-touring motorcycle with the company’s leaning-multi-wheel (LMW) technology. But the Niken GT wasn’t the only three-wheeler shown at EICMA; Yamaha also revealed a 300cc LMW scooter prototype called the 3CT.

Thanks to a Yamaha filing we uncovered from the European Union Intellectual Property Office, we now know what to expect from the Yamaha 3CT production model, and how closely it resembles the prototype.

The bodywork appears to be mostly unchanged, including the rather bird-like profile up front. The beak is high enough to show off the mechanism that allows the two front wheels to tilt and steer in tandem. While the lines are a bit sharper, there’s still a familial resemblance to Yamaha’s smaller 125cc and 155cc Tricity scooters which introduced its LMW technology.

Apart from a tall windscreen and a less blinged-out seat, plus the necessary mirrors, turn signals and a combination rear turn signal, fender and license plate mount, the overall design looks about the same as the prototype:

The prototype used Yamaha’s 300cc Blue Core engine (at least that’s what Yamaha calls it; technically, it’s a 292cc engine), the same motor offered on the XMax 300 which claims the engine produces 27.6 hp at 7250 rpm and 21.4 lb-ft. at 5750 rpm. We expect the same with the production model, barring any updates.

The design filings also keep the small pedal found on the right floorboard of the prototype. Yamaha didn’t explicitly say it, but we assume the pedal is for the 3CT’s tilt lock assist feature which can keep the three-wheeler upright even at a stop. Piaggio’s MP3 has a similar feature whereas this is a first for a Yamaha three-wheeler. Unlike the MP3, however, Yamaha says the 3CT’s tilt lock assist works without locking the suspension. Yamaha says this makes it smoother for stop-and-go operation while also keeping the weight low.

While the designs indicate it is going into production, what’s less clear is if the 3CT will be keeping that name. “3CT” is already pretty close to the Tricity branding Yamaha’s been using for several years now, with the “3” also describing the approximate engine displacement. I wouldn’t be surprised if we see this introduced as the 2020 Yamaha Tricity 300 at EICMA this November.