Designed Right the First Time! Would You Pay for It?

Motorcycle.com Staff
by Motorcycle.com Staff
The first thing a lot of bike buyers -- especially cruiser buyers -- do after picking up a new bike is start replacing factory parts. Granted, some of this is personalization (especially with the aforementioned cruisers). But in MANY cases, it's a matter of replacing cheap factory parts that just don't do the job. How many bike reviews have you read that end with, "a wonderful bike that needs only a better seat, firmer shocks, some fork tuning, and stickier tires to be a winner!"

The motorcycle aftermarket is thriving, not only because people like to personalize their bikes, but also because almost every motorcycle that rolls out of the showroom comes with one or more corner-cutting, bargain-basement, build-to-a-price components.

After you pick up your new bike, go to the Internet forum for that bike and you'll quickly find out all of the most-preferred replacements for the uncomfortable seat, crap tires, wimpy shocks, etc. It's a fantastic bike AFTER you replace the parts that aren't up to snuff. Yeah, there will undoubtedly be a few of you who will write in, "I haven't changed a single thing on my Vortex 950!" But if that's the case, your wallet probably still contains the photographs that came with it. The bottom line is, the average motorcycle buyer makes one or more FUNCTIONAL changes to the bike to remedy the shortcomings of factory fitments. So here's the question: Would you rather have the bike manufacturers do a better job on the original parts and pay more for the bike out the door, or would like to keep telling yourself that you're getting a Great Deal! as you look at the price you paid, then begin spending hundreds/thousands of dollars to buy aftermarket parts? What say you, MOrons?

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Motorcycle.com Staff
Motorcycle.com Staff

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