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-   -   SV 650s for novice rider? (https://www.motorcycle.com/forum/suzuki-news/2343-sv-650s-for-novice-rider.html)

SRMark 03-09-2004 02:19 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Sounds to me like you know what to do. Go do it.

longride 03-09-2004 02:25 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
You won't get in trouble with the SV650S. The only trouble is, if you buy the pinnacle of motorcycling greatness for your first bike, where do you go from there? I say start out with a 1966 BSA 650 and work your way up.

slackmeister 03-09-2004 02:50 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
You'll be fine. I was 28 when I took the MSF course last fall and I got an SV650 (naked) as my first bike. It's about perfect for me -light, low seat height (compared to most sportbikes) and has a wide, linear powerband.



By contrast, when I was first thinking about riding, I borrowed a friend's Yamaha Radian 600. It was fun but I also felt like the engine wanted to keep revving by itself, and would if I didn't pay strict attention to the throttle. I think that's just a feature of 4-cylinders since they're designed to make big power by revving to those stratospheric redlines. It's also probably the biggest reason the beginnnerbikes.com crowd steers you away from the 600s, other than just high horsepower ratings in general. You're on the right track sticking with a v-twin.

Whatmough 03-09-2004 02:52 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Scott,

You can get yourself in trouble with any motorcycle or scooter for that matter. I took a test ride on a Honda VFR and got a speeding ticket. Yes I know the guys at the motorcycle shop thought it was funny too. I decided against buying it partly because it was so inviting to go fast on. The track is the place to go fast. If you want to have both fast and fun the Zuk is a great bike for that. As long as you know where it's safe to go fast. I prefer the non-S model for better comfort and you can add wind protection if you like.

Cherii 03-09-2004 02:57 AM

SV650S is a great choice for a fairly novice rider
 
<tt>

I bought a 1999 SV650 as my first street bike after about 15 years away from bikes. I had several years of dirt riding experience, but none on the street. The SV650 and MSF RiderCourse got me going in a safe but very fun way. I now have a 2002 SV650S and like it even better.

<tt>

I hesitate to recommend the SV to anyone with absolutely zero riding experience because the low end torque can get the bike ahead of your brain very quickly if you're hamfisted with the throttle. A careful person would probably have no problem with it after just a weekend MSF RiderCourse, and 28 year olds are, in general, more careful than 18 year olds. In your case it should be no problem at all. The new 2004 with lower seat will be better for shorter riders, but at 6' that probably won't make any difference to you. In fact it may be worse if they didn't lower the pegs along with the seat.

<tt>

The SV doesn't have great suspension as sportbikes go, but compared to a Shadow Spirit it's probably considerably better. The cheap fix for the forks is to turn up the preload and use thicker oil to better damp it. The shock you're just gonna have to replace eventually. A Fox twin clicker or Traxxion Dynamics' Penske "sport shock" are the best bang for the buck. If you want top notch, go with RaceTech emulators and springs in the forks and an Ohlins shock. Changing exhaust is really for sound, 'cause you're not going to get much more out of the excellent motor. If you decode you need more braking power, EBC HH pads up front are great, and cheap, too. A Zero Gravity sport touring windscreen helps with wind protection. If you're wearing a 3/4 helmet behind a "Roman shield" windscreen on your Shadow, you're going to NEED a full face helmet.

<tt>

Great choice! I've also owned a 1998 VFR, 2000 Sprint ST, and 2002 Bandit 1200S - all great bikes, but I still love my 2002 SV650S and it has a permanent place in my garage...

nigeltufnel 03-09-2004 03:08 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Check out Rider magazine March 2004. They did a comparison between the SV650, Honda 599 and Yamaha FZ6.

Buzglyd 03-09-2004 03:09 AM

Re: SV650S is a great choice for a fairly novice rider
 
All you need is a Concours to complete the trifecta!

Buzglyd 03-09-2004 03:09 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I'm thinking ironhead Sportster would be a better choice.

Flickmeister 03-09-2004 03:35 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
So did MOTORCYCLIST in their new April 2004. Worth checking out.

Flickmeister 03-09-2004 03:57 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Yca get into serious trouble on any bike if your left brain to right wrist connection is out of whack. Personally, I think either the standard SV650 (my preference) or the 'S' model would be outstanding bikes for your riding experience. It isn't at all intimidating and as you gain experience and confidence, you won't out grow it and get bored. I've ridden the latest, greatest hyper sportbikes for over forty years and still consider the SV650 the most fun I've had on a motorcycle.



As far as all that you will hear about a less than state-of-the-art suspension, I'd suggest your first investment should be a good set of tires and a riding school or two before modifying the bike. I had a completely stock suspended SV650 and shredded a set of kneepads and scraped footpegs half away with the stock MEZ4 tires. I suggest getting your skills to a level that allows you to challenge the less than perfect suspension before any thing else. This can be done for under a grand. Besides, you can take it with you and it will help your riding prowess on any bike that you choose. Cheers, Jack

Joseph_Betor 03-09-2004 04:14 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I've owned an SV650 standard model with a Targa fairing for four years now and it works quite well, but I have just purchased a DL650 (same motor with a few modifications) and I think for someone 6' tall it might be even better. It has a more comfortable seat, can readily accommodate hard luggage and a top box and has smoother throttle response (good for a beginner.) I find the taller seat height and upright seating position gives better peripheral vision for commuting. Finally it has a larger fuel tank. It's the first bike I've owned in years that can go over 200 miles before hitting reserve.

naco_traficante 03-09-2004 04:31 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I've got an 2002 SV now and I don't see any problem. There are other good bikes available in the same general price/power range, too, but the SV bikes are pretty predictable if nothing else. Check out http://www.svrider.com/


tsrzad 03-09-2004 04:43 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Kudos to you, Jack.



Learning the limits of what hardware you currently is essential to appreciating any hardware upgrades you choose to make. Otherwise, new bling is just for benchracing!



Ted

longride 03-09-2004 04:52 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I'm thinking that would be his second bike.

Columbus 03-09-2004 04:58 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I don't want to hijack the thread, but what do you think of the DL650? I sat on one at the International Cycle Show, and I was impressed. I have a 2000 naked SV right now, but I wouldn't mind a bit more wind protection and better passenger accomodations.

sarnali 03-09-2004 05:00 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
A CL305 Scrambler w/ trials-universal tires is a fine starting point.

sarnali 03-09-2004 05:16 AM

Re: SV650S is a great choice for a fairly novice rider
 
You give some good advice Cherii, And your choice in bikes is pretty close to mine as well.

One of my daughters is an absolute bike nut ( don't know where she gets that ) and I was thinking an SV650 or 620 Ducati Monster would be a good first bike for her.

The standard SV1000 is on my short list of play bikes to have along with a dozen others, I'm just waiting for the money tree in my back yard to sprout.

sarnali 03-09-2004 05:28 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
The SV650, as you can tell is a very popular bike around here, in fact part of the holy trinity of SV650, (pre-owned) VFR and Concours. I'm sure you'll be more than happy riding one

Now the real question, how did the LASIK surgery work? I've heard all about it but I've never actually talked to anyone who had it done. Are you happy with the improvement in your vision and did it bring you up to 20/20? Or do you still need glasses for close-up or distance. Did it solve your vision problems across the whole range?

SF 03-09-2004 05:28 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
In 2001, I was in the same position as you. I did buy a SV650S, and I'm glad I did! Pefectly realible, cheap to insure, good power and handling. You can pick up a used one for about $4k. Powerwise it's enough to grow into. Also, I think less power would quickly bore you. I've ridden less powerful bike and think they are also dangerous, esp. for highway riding as you can't get up to speed fast enough to get out of the way.



Ride both the S and naked versions as there is a difference in riding position and gearing.



Also check out www.svrider.com



Scott

PS: I now have an R1 and think the SV was a great starter bike.

Buzglyd 03-09-2004 05:34 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Dude,



The LASIK is money well spent. I had it done in October. I was terribly near-sighted.



My vision is perfect in all respects. I don't need glasses for reading or up close work.



I may need reading glasses when I get older but that has nothing to do with the surgery.



Do it. Do it. Do it.

scottlit 03-09-2004 05:38 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Thanks to everybody for their great responses, BTW.



As for the LASIK, it's been great so far. My prescription was around -5.00 in both eyes before the surgery, corrected to 20/20 with contacts. At my two week follow-up, I was 20/20 one eye, and 20/25 the other, and with both eyes together I could with effort make out the 20/16 line. I think my vision has improved further since then.



I've got a follow-up appointement tomorrow for them to check on how I'm healing up, and was told at my initial consultation that it usually takes several months before your vision completely setlles down (read: don't be upset if you're not 20/20 by the morning after the surgery, or the week after, or even the month after, but give it some time), so I'm looking forward to gradual, continual improvement over the next few. I expect I may need a follow-up surgery (covered under the initial cost) to get me to absolute perfection, though (where the machine can detect no refractive abberation), but we'll see.



Oh, and I can see both close-up and far without any problems or need for correction.

mile_eater 03-09-2004 05:41 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Dude. You ain't 16. You're a big boy. Don't waste your time on a 650. Go get a litre bike. You are mature enough to ride one. I road my first street bike at age 28. A tricked out honda 929. My first bike, and the bike I still ride, is a CBR 1000F. The whole point of being mature and responsible, is that you get to play with the GOOD toys. So go do it.


BMW4VWW 03-09-2004 05:42 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I believe that the 305 Scrambler was designated the CL77, and was not considered to be a beginer's bike when Honda introduced it. VWW

James_Brown 03-09-2004 06:00 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Read the multi-bike shoot-out that MO did last year, which featured the SV:



http://mailhost.motorcycle.com/mo/mc...3_Mini_Nakeds/



You can pick up a very lightly used M750 for just over $4k. The maintenance costs are less than most would lead you to believe. When I bought my M750 just over 2.5 years ago, I had not been on a motorcycle in nearly ten years. I have found the Monster to be a very easy bike to live with.




seruzawa 03-09-2004 06:15 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
If you are looking for a purely novice bike then you'd have a hard time beating a Suzuki GS500E. You can find one really cheap used. A couple months on one and you'll be ready to tackle anything. Well, maybe not the new crop of literbikes, but almost no one is really ready for those.


seruzawa 03-09-2004 06:17 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Suzuki has dropped the plain SVs in both 650 and 1000 for 04. There might be some 03s around still.

rsb_joseph 03-09-2004 06:17 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
The SV is the perfect bike for you. For the record any bike you ride these days is fast enough to kill you or slow enough to get you killed. So do not worry about those that tell you the SV650 is too much they are comparing the bike to the old 70-80's bikes which were started and stopped slowly. The SV will start and stop quickly. The key to what bike you should select is in the connection of your brain to the throttle. If you are a sensible individual you will do OK and ride within your limits you do this and you will be OK. Don't fear motorcycles respect them.

rsb_joseph 03-09-2004 06:17 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
The SV is the perfect bike for you. For the record any bike you ride these days is fast enough to kill you or slow enough to get you killed. So do not worry about those that tell you the SV650 is too much they are comparing the bike to the old 70-80's bikes which were started and stopped slowly. The SV will start and stop quickly. The key to what bike you should select is in the connection of your brain to the throttle. If you are a sensible individual you will do OK and ride within your limits you do this and you will be OK. Don't fear motorcycles respect them and always wear gear!!!

rsb_joseph 03-09-2004 06:20 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
The SV is the perfect bike for you. For the record any bike you ride these days will either be fast enough to kill you or slow enough to get you killed. Plus who wants to buy a bike they are going to sell 3 months later. You are not buying your your last bike, but do not settle for something you will not be happy with because somebody scared the hell out of you.



Do not worry about those that tell you the SV650 is too much they are comparing the bike to the old 70-80's bikes which started and stopped slowly. The SV will start quicker but also and stop quicker.



The key to what bike you should select is in the connection of your brain to the throttle. If you are a sensible individual you will do OK and ride within your limits you do this and you will be OK.



Don't fear motorcycles respect them and always wear gear!!!

Puck 03-09-2004 06:46 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
This person is a retard

Mooner 03-09-2004 06:48 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I also had the lasik done (about one month ago) It is great! They cannot currently fix the problem everybody encouters as they age (i.e. the need for reading glasses). Don't know about not riding for 90 days. They told me no "contact" sports. I don't consider downhill skiing a contact sport, so I went 3 days later. Can'y go riding yet (darn snow), but don't see why it would be a problem.

Tigercub 03-09-2004 06:48 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
What? Are you crazy? You don't want to start a new rider out on a bike with a plain bearing crank and single-leading shoe front brake. He needs a '69 or'70 Tiger 650. Twin-leading shoe front brake, single carb, roller-bearing crank. That thing was built for sport-touring and a great reliable commuter bike as well. Also, I have a spare set of points for one if you're interested.

Tigercub 03-09-2004 07:01 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
You've got the right attitude. There are three things to think about what you need in this bike.



1) It should have good throttle response at low RPM when on and off the throttle. No bucking. Stay away from 4-cylinders and small flywheels. You want a twin with a big flywheel.

2) The brakes should have a progressive feel and excellent stopping power as the lever is squeezed harder with 3 fingers.

3) The bike should roll into turns all the way to about a 45 degree angle and roll right back up with a little throttle or push on the bar.



The Triumph Bonneville does all this pretty well and probably so does the Suzuki.




rowdo 03-09-2004 07:08 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
I had a 2002 SV650S. Now I ride a Volusia (800cc cruiser). In terms of comfort, it's night and day. On the SV I used to take breaks when going on long rides. On the Volusia I can go for hours and not feel tired.



Yes the SVS is a nice bike, but realize that like all sporty bikes it's built more for "looks" than comfort.



Rowdo



PS: My girlfriend's butt prefers the cruiser seat hands down.


sarnali 03-09-2004 07:08 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Thanks for the feedback on LASIK everyone. I've worn glasses most of my life and I've been thinking of looking into getting my vision corrected.

Buzglyd 03-09-2004 07:14 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Yeah well try getting your attitude corrected too!



Oops! Sorry I thought I was replying to KPaul.

mile_eater 03-09-2004 07:14 AM

Re: SV650S for novice rider?
 
Good. Don't discuss the points I made about a mature individual being able to handle a more powerful bike. Just throw an insult. I guess that's easier than actually thinking huh? Who wants to use a few grey cells when you could just take 15 minutes to peck out that 5 word sentence.



In the future, if you are going to reply with one sentence, at least take a few seconds to edit it for content. Is 'this person' refering to me, or the author?


sarnali 03-09-2004 07:17 AM

Re: A cruiser rider who wants to switch, longride say it ain't so. Get a 600 SuperS
 
Come off it, Kpaul. The SV is for all intents and purposes every bit as good a street bike as your 600, plus he said he wanted a standard.

I'm sure you know your bike well, but since you don't have alot of experiance on differant bikes how can you say that the inline 600's the best for all situations?

sarnali 03-09-2004 07:20 AM

Re: instant A-hole, just add alchohol
 
Nothing wrong with MY attitude [email protected]&^%*^$$#@@R Maybe you need my size 12 to tighten your nuts

Oops, sorry I thought I was Kpaul.


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