I’ve heard about a new, sportier, quarter-liter sportbike from Hyosung for some time, but this is the first time I’d seen the GD250R in person. There wasn’t a rep available to bounce questions off of, but simply looking at it, it sure is a mean looking 250. Hyosung’s website has the GD250R listed at $4,099, $300 cheaper than the 2016 Honda CBR300R, the other single-cylinder (granted, it’s displacing 286cc) sportbike in this category. Of course, with the quarter-liter class graduating to 300cc, the Hyosung is already on the back foot as far as power goes. The white one in the background was fitted with an aftermarket exhaust canister, but personally I like the slimmer profile of this stocker, with the exhaust gasses exiting from underneath the bike.

  • Sentinel

    Make one with passenger accommodations and integrated luggage attachment points and I’m in!

  • sgray44444

    Ford has proven the viability of the turbo concept used for normal production vehicles. I think it’s fairly obvious that we will eventually see this carried over to motorcycles looking for even more horsepower per liter. The big advantage is in midrange torque with less displacement, which is a benefit for any street bike.

  • kenneth_moore

    At least one of the “other sites” reporting is calling the forced induction here “supercharging.” The Recursion concept has been labeled turbocharged from the start. I guess the H2 confused them.

    • denchung

      The earlier patent did use the word supercharger, but kind of leaves open both possibilities. At one point in the document, it does reads: “the supercharger (30) being a so-called turbo which compresses the air intake by utilizing the exhaust stream …” so it looks like Suzuki may have been considering both options but later decided to go with the turbo.

    • Kevin Duke

      Forced induction is, in some circles, described simply as supercharging – the intake charge being force-fed by some sort of compressor, whether by an exhaust-driven turbine (turbo) or a compressor driven mechanically from the engine via gears (H2) or a belt (Roehr). It’s more specific to distinguish between the two terms, as we did here. The “supercharger” in the Recursion is definitely a turbocharger, as it’s clearly driven from the exhaust headers. .

      • kenneth_moore

        That’s how the two systems have always been distinguished in my mind too: supercharging is driven by horsepower directly from the engine via mechanical means with a net increase in power, turbocharging is powered “for free” via the exhaust gas energy but typically with a noticeable lag in power delivery.

  • I had a Hyosung GD250R as my first bike to get back into riding. I sold it in less than a year due to reliability issues and the size being way too small for my 189cm frame. I have a Suzuki GSX650F now.

  • spiff

    That’s a “Lil Yamamonster”.

  • dbwindhorst

    ““It looks like a Honda Ruckus only on a bigger scale.”

    So…is it too late to trademark “Honda Brouhaha”?

  • Andy C

    No photos of the Ducati lawnmower?

    Well, at least the Superleggera did have the most amazing single-sided swingarm I’d ever seen.

  • Gruf Rude

    Nick O’Kane, national account manager for K&N, owns the CBX track bike.

  • Scott Toll

    Vanderhall took the show, IMO.