Look around the liter-class sportbike landscape. The field is littered with some of the most technologically advanced and blindingly fast motorcycles the world has ever seen. Trickle-down technology from the world of MotoGP and World Superbike is making its way to production motorcycles faster than ever before, and it’s hard to deny the sportbike landscape is all the better for it.

Get the Flash Player to see this player.

Considering how fast, how advanced, and how downright amazing today’s literbikes are, how much would you expect to pay for such performance? Twenty grand? Forty? More? Taking into account the cost of today’s fastest hypercars, which can’t hold a candle to today’s literbikes in terms of sheer acceleration, even paying $50,000 can seem like a relative bargain.

Ducati Panigale Superleggera Quick-Ride Review + Video

Luckily for us, we can get our hands on these amazing two-wheeled rocketships for $17,000 – and have some change left over – and that’s exactly what we have here.

Arguably the most anticipated Japanese sportbike of 2016 – and a bike the MO staff had yet to ride – the new Kawasaki ZX-10R is all the buzz this year. Featuring entirely updated electronics centered around a five-axis IMU, a lighter, more powerful engine, and a Showa 43mm Balance Free Fork adapted from the World Superbike paddock, our test Zed, kitted with ABS and the KRT paint scheme costs $16,299, only $200 less than the Aprilia ($16,499). Our Australian correspondent, Jeff Ware, covered the bike in very thorough detail, which you can read about here.

One of our favorite literbikes has now come under threat from a new Japanese challenger. Whichever way you lean, now is a great time to be a sportbike enthusiast.

One of our favorite literbikes has now come under threat from a new Japanese challenger. Whichever way you lean, now is a great time to be a sportbike enthusiast.

Readers of our three-part 2015 Six-Way Superbike Shootout (Track, Street, Overall) will recall the BMW S1000RR took top honors in our test by the narrowest of margins, with the Aprilia RSV4 RF hot on its heels. Both bikes, as tested, spill well over the cap set for this test, and though the base version S1000RR is listed for $16-large ($15,695, to be exact), good luck actually finding one in the wild. BMW didn’t even have one available for us to test.

Here’s where things get interesting. Aprilia’s lower-spec version of the RSV4 RF, the RSV4 RR, costs just $16,499 and unlike RSV4s of the past, is largely the same as its top-shelf sibling, even sharing the exact same engine with titanium valves, variable-length intake funnels, CNC-machined combustion chambers, and upgraded exhaust system. Even the electronics package doesn’t change. The difference between the two is that the RR isn’t limited in its production (only 200 RF models are coming to North America), the RR uses Sachs suspension instead of the Ohlins on the RF, cheaper (and heavier) cast aluminum wheels on the RR replace the forged units on the RF, and the RR uses plastic body panels in areas where the RF uses carbon fiber.

The “poor man’s” Aprilia RSV4, the RR version here is anything but cheap. And that’s a good thing.

The “poor man’s” Aprilia RSV4, the RR version here is anything but cheap. And that’s a good thing.

Considering our price cap, how well the RF did in last year’s Superbike test, the fact BMW couldn’t get us a standard S1000RR, and that we hadn’t yet tested the RSV4 RR, it was a natural pick to go up against the latest Green Ninja. E-i-C Kevin Duke outlines the major changes to the RSV4 line in 2016 in his RSV4 RF First Ride review here.

Racetrack Rippers

Both of these machines are designed and bred on the track, so it’s a natural starting point for this test. With 170-plus horsepower each, there aren’t very many locations in the SoCal area where we can properly stretch the legs of both of these fire breathers. That’s where the fine folks at Fastrack Riders come in.

Fastrack has long been the organization to turn to when it comes to riding at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California. The course has been used to host AMA rounds in the past, and the utilization of its NASCAR straight makes it one of the few tracks in SoCal where riders can actually use sixth gear on a 1000cc sportbike. The organization is under new ownership now, but providing a safe and fun environment to ride your motorcycle is still top priority. Whether you’re a new track rider or an experienced vet, Fastrack has a level for you and instructors who can help show you some tips and tricks, including occasional celebrity pro instructors like Eric Bostrom. Gear rental is available, as are new-rider schools for track noobs. With memberships, discount packs, and even the Fastrack Academy offering a chance to compete for a new KTM RC390, Fastrack Riders is more than just a trackday organization.

The new ZX-10R impresses with its cornering stability and front-end confidence.

The new ZX-10R impresses with its cornering stability and front-end confidence.

But a trackday is all we needed for this test. The RSV4 RR could be considered a favorite here, taking into account how well past iterations of RSV4 have done in the past. Its agile handling and lovable engine are both entities we know and love about the bike. Both Tom “Mr. Excuses” Roderick and I were amazed that, even at 462 lbs – 8 lbs more than the Kawasaki – the RR handles as well as it does. Direction changes require little effort, while feedback and chassis stability are rock solid. In short, it felt like we could confidently put the bike anywhere we wanted to.

“What can I say that we haven’t already said about Aprilia’s RSV4?” asks Tom. “No matter what edition we’re testing, the RSV4 exhibits the most confidence-inspiring handling manners of any sportbike in existence. Quick transitions or long, fast sweepers, the RSV goes about the business of cornering like a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon wielding a scalpel.”

Of course, this shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. The motorcycle press, including (especially?) MO have said as much over the years. What’s maybe the big surprise here is that the ZX-10R is nearly as good. Both Roderick and I were impressed with the Kawasaki’s stability leaned over, and the feedback provided by the new Balance Free Fork. Side-to-side flicks still favor the Aprilia, but the difference would only be noticeable when riding both bikes back to back.

As sweet as the Kawasaki is, it’s still can’t match the balance, stability, and nimbleness provided by the RSV4.

As sweet as the Kawasaki is, it’s still can’t match the balance, stability, and nimbleness provided by the RSV4.

The ZX-10R claws back ground to the Ape thanks to its Brembo M50 calipers and 330mm discs (Brembo M430 clamps and 320mm discs come on the RR). At the risk of sounding like a broken record, we’ll say it again: the M50s are nothing short of awesome. Braking power, modulation and feel are mindblowing, allowing the rider to confidently trailbrake to any apex they desire with exact precision. To its credit, the Aprilia’s brakes are nearly as good, but don’t quite measure up. Switchable ABS comes on both bikes (and the Kawi is available without ABS entirely).

With the chassis and braking systems being so close on both supersports, the decider here are the engines. Kawasaki made a number of changes to the 10R’s engine (again, see Ware’s exhaustive review for full details), allowing it to spin easier and breathe freer in an effort to pump out more power compared to the model it’s replacing. Kawi succeeded, too, as our ZX-10R test bike put out 170.0 hp at 11,900 rpm and 76.3 lb-ft at 11,500 rpm to the wheels when measured on the Hypercycle Dynojet dyno. This compared to the 160.6 hp at 11,700 rpm and 73.6 lb-ft at 11,200 rpm of the outgoing model we dyno’d last year on the MotoGP Werks Dynojet dyno. Keen observers will notice the new 10R reaches its peak power at slightly higher rpm than the old model, a further nod to its racetrack orientation.

Impressive as the 10R’s new found power might be, it’s still trumped by the Aprilia, its V-4 engine making 179.5 hp at 13,700 rpm and 77.5 lb-ft at 10,500 rpm. Better still, a look at the dyno chart will show that the Italian outclasses the Kawi at nearly every point on their respective rev ranges. This is more than just dyno chart fodder, too – the difference in power is obvious from the saddle. Auto Club’s point-and-shoot turns means the rider is scrubbing a lot of speed down to the apex, then launching themselves out after, not leaving a lot of room for maintaining corner speed.

Kawasaki’s efforts to increase horsepower succeeded, but at the cost of low- to mid-range power. Not only does the Aprilia make more power and torque, but it does so at virtually every point on the graph. That’s a difference you can feel on the road.

Kawasaki’s efforts to increase horsepower succeeded, but at the cost of low- to mid-range power. Not only does the Aprilia make more power and torque, but it does so at virtually every point on the graph. That’s a difference you can feel on the road.

It’s at these corner exits that both Tom and I noticed a lag of power from the Kawi until about 8000 rpm, when a sudden boom in horses would kick in. Clicking down to first gear solves the waiting game, but comes with the drawback of needing to be incredibly delicate with the throttle or risk being propelled forward faster than you anticipate (assuming the tire grips) or, depending on your traction control settings, launched over the highside (assuming the tire does not). This top-heavy power output results in “the Ninja’s biggest detriment,” says Tom.

“This is made more obvious when there’s an Aprilia RSV4 RR to climb aboard with more mid-range power that makes second gear corner exits something to look forward to,” T-Rod adds. It’s true, the difference in mid-range power between the two is blatantly clear when exiting slower-speed corners in second gear. Whereas the Kawi is working on building up its power, the Aprilia has the grunt down low to cleanly pull away and the heft up top to stay ahead. Then, of course, there’s the music each engine makes. “Subjectively, the sound emanating from the Aprilia’s pipe is a cacophony of the most ear-pleasing mechanical symphony to exit a stock exhaust,” Tom opines.

Showa’s Balance Free Fork, tech taken from the World Superbike paddock, performed well in both street and track environments, though the Brembo M50 calipers are the stars of this picture.

Showa’s Balance Free Fork, tech taken from the World Superbike paddock, performed well in both street and track environments, though the Brembo M50 calipers are the stars of this picture.

Transmissions are pretty evenly matched between the two. Both offer quickshifters (a first for Kawasaki outside the H2/H2R), with the Aprilia’s cleaner going up while the Green Machine down changes a hair slicker. Both bikes offer superb slipper clutches that make sixth-to-first downshifts a non-issue.

A discussion about top-class literbikes on track can’t end without mentioning electronics, and both bikes shine here, too. The addition of Bosch’s five-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) has opened up the ZX-10R’s technological capabilities, and the tech most felt on the track was the heavily updated S-KTRC (Kawasaki’s term for traction control) which now features a hybrid predictive/reactive set of algorithms to better limit slip while still providing drive. Riding on the stock Bridgestone RS10 R rubber on the ZX, and with so much power on tap, getting the rear to start spinning isn’t a difficult task. But with the TC set in the number 3 setting (of five), just enough slide is initiated to tell the rider to back off a smidge while still letting them leave a darkie on the tarmac.

The Aprilia, meanwhile, doesn’t feature an IMU, and though its standard Pirelli Supercorsa SP tires are very sticky, they’re also easy to spin. Set to the middle position of eight, the RR’s intervention is more noticeable as it reacts to the rear tire losing and gaining traction. For a given setting the ZX-10R’s TC is more sophisticated, but the Aprilia’s more usable spread of power is linear enough for the experienced rider to exploit it without as much reliance on TC. Then, of course, one can always crank the intervention up or down at the push of a toggle while riding, a rare feature among TC systems. However, Tom notes that, “in a strangely non-intuitive way, Kawasaki chose to make the up button reduce TC while the down button increases TC.”

The sound that comes out of that exhaust is one of the most thrilling in all of motorcycling.

The sound that comes out of that exhaust is one of the most thrilling in all of motorcycling.

Ultimately lap times are what matter at the racetrack. Here the battle was close, but unanimous for the RSV4 RR. Both Tom and I set our quickest lap aboard the Aprilia, with Tom 1.4 seconds quicker and yours truly 0.8 second faster than our best times on the Kawasaki. The different tires didn’t play much of a factor either, as neither Tom nor I felt one set held us back any more than the other. The major reason we lapped faster on the Aprilia was the difference in power output, the Aprilia offering loads more grunt off corner exits compared to the Kawasaki. Interestingly, the GPS data says the Kawasaki peaked at 158 mph on the front straight while the Aprilia could “only” muster 152.3 mph. Traffic played a part in the Aprilia’s speed, but regardless, the Kawi would have required a much longer straight to make up the gap the RSV pulls out of each corner.

Thinly Veiled Track Weapons

Sure, by virtue of having lights, mirrors and license plates, both bikes are technically legal for use on public roads, but as I’ve stated before: Sportbikes are Terrible on the street. Both bikes have virtually the same seat height, 33 inches, but the feeling from the saddle is drastically different between the two. The Aprilia makes it perfectly clear it’d rather be at the track, perching the rider high above the bars with a commanding view of the road ahead. The downside to the great view is the pressure it puts on the wrists with the clip-ons in their track-ready position. To make matters worse, the seat’s “as cushiony as tempered-steel,” says Roderick, “and the seat’s edges do their best to slice through your hamstrings.” For as much as we adore the thing on the track, you better have some built-in cushioning of your own (if you catch our drift) if the RSV4 is to be your choice for the street.

The broad spread of usable power we appreciate from the Aprilia at the track is even more important on the street, where it’s rare one will ever rev near redline.

The broad spread of usable power we appreciate from the Aprilia at the track is even more important on the street, where it’s rare one will ever rev near redline.

The ZX-10R is relatively comfortable by comparison, its rider not perched so high and the seat offering a touch more padding. There’s weight on the wrists here too, but it’s not nearly as pronounced as on the RSV4. Tooling down the freeway, the Kawi is easily the one we’d rather be on due to its more comfortable ergos.

Engine heat is another annoyance with the RSV that wasn’t an issue at the track. Waiting at a stop light, the heat radiating from the hot engine below can cook the thighs. It’s a nice feeling on cold rides but brutal come summer time. It’s enough to be considered a “major drawback” in Tom’s eyes. Meanwhile, the ZX nicely channels engine heat away from the rider so its effects at a stop are far less noticeable.

But waiting at lights is the precursor to playing in the canyons, where the traits we noticed at the track carry over. Neither bike leaves anything to be desired in the handling department, though we noticed the Aprilia’s Sachs shock was firmer over rough patches of road. Playing with the clickers quickly solved that issue, but interestingly the ZX-10R’s settings didn’t need to be changed at either venue.

Kawasaki did a commendable job tuning its latest suspension on the ZX-10R to be both compliant on the street and controlled on track.

Kawasaki did a commendable job tuning its latest suspension on the ZX-10R to be both compliant on the street and controlled on track.

What it came down to, again, was mid-range power. Where the Aprilia could finish a turn and power out, the Kawasaki rider would ask for acceleration and face a delay before the surge kicked in, depending, of course, on the speed of the corner and the gear selected. We’d bet a simple sprocket change could transform the Kawasaki’s attitude, but stock-for-stock, this is the 10R’s biggest setback.

There Can Be Only One

All in all, we salute Kawasaki for the transformation it’s given to the ZX-10R compared to the model it replaces. It’s convincingly better in practically every aspect. The electronic updates place it on par with the top of the superbike field, and as a starting point for modifications, there’s huge potential for it. As a streetbike, the Kawasaki is more comfortable than the Aprilia, dissipates heat better, and even has usable mirrors. And to our eyes, it even looks better, too. “I have to admit,” Tom says, “I found the KRT edition incredibly attractive. The Ninja’s new bodywork is very stylish, while the graphics are aggressive without being gaudy.”

We’ve long been fans of Aprilia’s RSV4, and the many updates to the platform in 2015 have vaulted it another level higher. The 2016 RR is one hell of a motorcycle.

We’ve long been fans of Aprilia’s RSV4, and the many updates to the platform in 2015 have vaulted it another level higher. The 2016 RR is one hell of a motorcycle.

The love for both machines is displayed on the official MO scorecard too, as the Aprilia’s 93.7% final score barely edged out the Kawi’s 91.0%. However, it’s the Aprilia RSV4 RR that shines brightest. Its lovable handling isn’t topped by the Kawi, and it’s almost unfair how well its engine performs. For only $200 extra over the 10R, we’d choose the RSV4 and put up with its more limited dealer support for its valve checks than what’s offered from Kawasaki (recommended every 12,000 miles for the Aprilia; 15,000 miles for the Kawasaki).

“With the changes Aprilia made to last year’s model,” Tom notes, “the RSV is simply hard to beat no matter what bike we’re comparing to. In this contest, were I given $16,000 and a choice between these two motorcycles, the decision for me would be easy; Aprilia.”

2016 Aprilia RSV4 RR
+ Highs

  • Powerful, user-friendly engine
  • Sublime handling
  • Lots of bang for your buck
– Sighs

  • Racer ergos terrible on the street
  • Excess engine heat roasts the thighs
  • Mirrors practically useless
2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R
+ Highs

  • Electronics package on par with the best
  • Brembo M50s!
  • Great chassis
– Sighs

  • Power is all upstairs
  • Shock adjusters can be difficult to reach
  • Doesn’t excite like the Aprilia
The $17,000 Superbike Faceoff Scorecard
Category Aprilia RSV4 RR Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R
Price 98.8% 100%
Weight 98.3% 100%
lb/hp 100% 96.3%
lb/lb-ft 99.8% 100%
Total Objective Scores 99.0% 99.4%
Engine 98.1% 77.5%
Transmission/Clutch 93.8% 92.5%
Handling 97.5% 92.5%
Brakes 92.5% 97.5%
Suspension 87.5% 90.0%
Technologies 91.3% 92.5%
Instruments 90.0% 87.5%
Ergonomics/Comfort 81.3% 86.3%
Quality, Fit & Finish 90.0% 90.0%
Cool Factor 93.8% 91.3%
Grin Factor 95.0% 91.3%
Tom’s Subjective Scores 92.9% 89.2%
Troy’s Subjective Scores 91.9% 88.5%
Overall Score 93.7% 91.0%
The $17,000 Superbike Faceoff Specifications
Aprilia RSV4 RR Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R ABS
MSRP $16,499 $14,999 (Standard Non-ABS), $15,299 (KRT Edition Non-ABS), $15,999 (Standard ABS), $16,299 (KRT Edition ABS)
Engine Type 999.6cc Liquid-cooled, DOHC, four-stroke, 65-degree V4, 4 valves per cylinder 998cc Liquid-cooled, DOHC, four-stroke, inline-Four, 4 valves per cylinder
Bore and Stroke 78.0mm x 52.3mm 76.0mm x 55.0mm
Compression Ratio 13.6:1 13.0:1
Rear Wheel Horsepower 179.5 hp @ 13,700 rpm 170.0 hp @ 11,900 rpm
Torque 77.5 lb-ft @ 10,500 rpm 76.3 lb-ft @ 11,500 rpm
lb/hp 2.6 2.7
lb/torque 6.0 6.0
Transmission 6-speed; multi-plate wet clutch w/slipper function 6-speed, multi-plate wet clutch w/slipper function, positive neutral finder
Final Drive Chain Chain
Front Suspension SACHS steering damper.
43mm SACHS upside down units fully adjustable. Wheel travel: 4.7 in.
43mm inverted Balance Free Fork, adjustable stepless rebound and compression damping, spring preload adjustability. 4.7 in travel
Rear Suspension Aluminum alloy swingarm. SACHS piggyback shock absorber with adjustable spring preload, compression, rebound damping and length. Wheel travel: 5.1 in. Horizontal back-link with Balance Free gas-charged shock, stepless, dual-range (low-/high-speed) compression damping, stepless rebound damping, fully adjustable spring preload/4.5 in
Front Brake Double 320mm lightweight stainless steel floating discs. New M430 Brembo monobloc radial calipers with 4 opposed 30mm pistons. Sintered pads. New radial master cylinder. Metal braided brake line. Intelligent Braking (KIBS), Brembo dual semi-floating 330mm discs with dual radial mounted M50 monobloc 4-piston calipers
Rear Brake 220mm rotor. Brembo twin-piston caliper KIBS-controlled, single 220mm disc with aluminum single-piston caliper
Front Tire 120/70-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP (Road compound) 120/70-17 Bridgestone RS-10 R (Road compound)
Rear Tire 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP (Road compound) 190/55-17 Bridgestone RS-10 R (Road compound)
Rake/Trail 24.5 deg/4.1 in 25 deg / 4.2 in.
Wheelbase 56.4 in. 56.7 in.
Seat Height 33.6 in. 32.9 in.
Curb Weight (Claimed) 456 lbs. (398 dry + 29.4 for 4.6 gal fuel = 427.4 454.2 lbs.
Fuel Capacity 4.9 gal. 4.5 gal.
ABS X X
Cornering ABS
Magnesium wheels
Forged aluminum wheels Yes
Titanium connecting rods
Titanium valves X
Aluminum fuel tank
Smartphone app X
Electronic suspension
Quickshifter X X
Clutchless downshift ability
Power modes X X
Traction control X X
Slide control
Launch control X X
Wheelie control X X
Engine brake control X
Inertial Measurement Unit X
GPS telemetry Via smartphone app
Corner Management Function X

Free Insurance Quote

Enter your ZIP code below to get a free insurance quote.

Aprilia Dealer Price Quote

Get price quotes for Aprilia from local motorcycle dealers.

Aprilia Communities

Kawasaki Communities

  • ADB

    This proves what many of your readers have been saying – it’s a golden time for the motorcycle world. There doesn’t seem to be a bad motorcycle made now days, and these two would have been considered upper end, full blown race bikes not to long ago. Now anyone can own a super bike.

  • Dootin

    Thank god i am an adult. I can’t imagine the fun i would have had on this bike at 17, right before i died.

  • Alan G

    tuono 1100 factory, best of both worlds

    • Steve Cole

      For the street? Absolutely! For racing… well, erhm… it’s a great bike but no class to race it in, and it’s down something like 25hp on the RSV4. If all you do is track days, though…

      • Alan G

        Yes, street. Shaman666, I’m VFR1200 BTW.
        1100 has better midrange though; but needs better
        aerodynamics like the RSV.

        • Steve Cole

          Personally I prefer the Tuono on the street. In fact, I kept my old 2007 V-twin yet another year. I just love it. More aerodynamics wouldn’t make the bike any better in the way that I use it. Now, racing… that’s a different proposition.

      • ColoradoS14

        The new one is dynoing at 165 to the rear wheel, so they are down on the RSV4 but up on some of the older 1000s.

  • Tavi Ruth

    a stock zx10r is electronically limited to produce only 85-90% of its power.

    • ColoradoS14

      You have confirmed this with the new bike? Because if I am not mistaken this one is dynoing a full 10 whp more than the model it is replacing and I hate to tell you but it is not down 15% on power. If what you are saying is true, this bike is only a tune away from 200whp (170/.85) and that is simply not going to be true. The BMW remains the king of the heap in top line numbers at about 185 to the wheels. Let’s just say that kawi is closing the throttle or pulling a ton of timing at the top, look at the chart, you may get another 5-10whp with an exhaust and a tune but probably not much more.

      • Tavi Ruth

        http://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/kawasaki/2016-kawasaki-zx-10r-review-and-dyno-test.html

        power starts to cut at certain rpm. its part of kawasaki’s US noise and emissions package. also among the liter bikes, I believe zx10r is the only euro5 compliant.

        bmws1000rr gets away with being at the edge of that emission and noise restriction. As what happened at Laguna Seca when motorcycle.com did a comparo. the stock s1000rr were exceeding the noise emission.

        note: not all dyno produce the same result that be due to calibration or environmental factors.
        lets say if you dyno a s1000rr at 185 the 10r would probably do 180-183 (no exhaust only flash on ecu)
        and if another dyno is showing 195 for s1000rr, then that dyno would show zx10r at 190-193.

        • Steve Cole

          Aprilia hasn’t neutered its bike that much, but the euro version of it also puts out considerably more power. It makes power past 13K, whereas the stock North American ECU tails off fast around 12.8K.

          • ColoradoS14

            Yea, unfortunately Laguna is perhaps the most sound restricted track in the country. A bunch of a-holes moving in next door to a beautiful track that has been there since 1957 and then demanding they do something about the noise. Hey guess what dicks, don’t move in next to a track if you don’t like it. It is the equivalent of me moving in next to an established airport and demanding the FAA change their flight plan. I get it if they build a track new but this is not the case at Laguna.

        • ColoradoS14

          http://www.motorcycle.com/shoot-outs/2015-six-way-superbike-track-shootout-video

          Same dyno, same day, the 2015 ZX10 is down almost 25 whp on the S1000RR, I just dont think you will see a gain of 25whp on the tune, maybe a full exhaust and tune will get you 15 hp on the new bike. Time will tell.

  • monsterduc1000

    I read on this site in a previous article, http://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/kawasaki/2016-kawasaki-zx-10r-review-and-dyno-test.html, that the North American version of the zx10r is neutered compared to the rest of the world due to emission/noise restrictions.

    Quote from the earlier article, “Also, as previously, European ZX-10Rs aren’t programmed with the restrictive tuning of American Ninjas. And neither are Aussie ZXs. The ProCycle dyno in Slack’s Creek, Australia, measured an incredible 194.7 hp at 13,300 rpm on a stock Aussie 10R when set to the STD (rather than SAE) correction factor. Farrell says to expect about 4 hp less if set to SAE, which is still a ridiculous 190 hp!”

    I wonder if the same is true for the Aprilia and would like to see a non-NA test with the bikes utilizing their full potential :)

    • Steve Cole

      The same is true of all the bikes entering the U.S. With slip-on and tune, the S1000RR and RSV4 will also make in the neighbourhood of 195whp. But they will both still slaughter the ZX10R (and R1) in the midrange. 😉

      • monsterduc1000

        195 is unreal! I remember when my ’04 zx10r scared the crap out of me back in the day (still gives me the giggles when I whack it wfo 😀 ). Now with bikes capable of 40 more horse, CRAZY!

    • halfkidding

      I understand why these super bikes are tested in stock form. In part probably not to encourage people to That doesn’t mean it makes any sense in the real world.

  • Vrooom

    Given these are probably going to be on the track about as often as I’m in Kate Upton’s panties (even less than you think), I’d probably go for the comfortable one.

  • Steve Cole

    I ride a RSV4 on the street. No it’s not a touring bike but I can’t imagine calling it awful on the street. It’s better than my 2006 GSX-R was, for the most part. The GSXR was great until about a half tank in when the seat would pack down… and excitement-wise even with 175whp and super light weight of the GSX-R, it was kinda boring unless ridden near its limits. Sounds like the ZX10R is somewhat similar that way.

    I also don’t find either of my RSV4s (sold a 2013 Factory to pick up 2016 RF #76 last year) to be overly hot. You can feel it but I have ridden a lot of bikes that were just as hot or hotter… the S1000RR I was on tried to broil me alive, as did a 1199S.

    • ColoradoS14

      This is the reason I prefer the V bikes on the street, the torquey nature of them does not require you to feel like you are being a lunatic to have a blast. Too bad the new Ducatis lost a lot of that bottom end. I just dont know if I could bring myself to buy a “standard” inline-4 anymore. They are a great tool, and on the track can be tough to beat but I do 90% of my riding on the street and for me the character and soul of a V-Twin, V-4 or Crossplane I-4 is just so much more appealing.

      The RSV4 is not even close to as hot as the Panigale.

  • Steve Cole

    BTW I finally made the video work – I had to use Internet Explorer (ugh). The RSV4 also has variable engine braking controlled by the throttle map. In ‘R’ mode (Race), there is almost no engine braking, ‘T’ map has the same throttle response but slightly more braking, and ‘S’ has direct throttle response and the most engine braking.

  • ColoradoS14

    This is all you need to know really…
    https://youtu.be/q3WdxhXlLpc

    • Brian Clasby

      Love. The. Sound. I find it interesting though that I was not impressed by the sound of it revving but under load it speaks to me. Too bad it’s too much bike for me!

  • Craig Hoffman

    The Aprilia is just plain cool, the Ninja, somehow, manages to not be. The Japanese build awesome bikes, but for years they miss the mark in the admittedly hard to define cool factor. Their cruisers are not that cool and neither are their sport bikes. Poor Japan, Inc. The new R1 is pretty darn cool though.

    If I am going to own a bike like this, it absolutely has to be cool, so in this comparo, the Ape is the no brainer go to purchase. These are not practical vehicles after all, and if they are not cool, they are just not that appealing.

    • Steve Cole

      I agree with you entirely. I also think that you will enjoy yourself much more of the time on the Aprilia versus the ZX10R. The Ape feels like a leashed animal and it growls, howls, gurgles and grunts at you like one. The sounds, vibes and general attitude of the bike are endlessly entertaining. You feel not only like you’re riding something special, but something bio-mechanical. When you throw down, it is a willing partner in crime and punishment.

      The inline-4s on the street just kinda hum and they come alive only when you are riding them at 10/10ths – which is where I am fine/in love with them. I race three GSX-Rs (a/b/sbk) and in their element they are fantastic, but on the street I mostly look forward to the next coffee shop on an inline-4… you can’t use the motor where it gets good most of the time, even canyon running doesn’t let you use the top 3,000 rpm where the inlines thrive. I prefer a twin or a v4 in that environment.

      As for the R1, my experience with R1 reliability with my friends and acquaintances has been terrible. I’ve detailed the reasons elsewhere but it is #1 with a magazine full of bullets for engine failures with people I know. The new one is too new, but already it has had a transmission recall and a “oops I lit myself on fire” recall in the first year of production. Was talking with a guy online just yesterday who lost a motor in his 2006 R1, and he can’t even find one for sale because the wreckers are telling him they all blow up. That’s……….. not good.

  • Jacob Prusa

    I am in the market for a new bike that will be used for track days and canyon riding. I have narrowed it down to a new 2015 R1 (non-R1M) or a new 2016 RSV4 RR (non-RF). These bikes both fit my body size very well so that is not a determining factor. I currently have a 2016 Tuono Factory so I will keep this as my “street” bike so comfort and street friendly aspects don’t play much in the decision making. I also have a Yamaha and Aprilia dealer very close to me so dealer network issues are also not an issue. I have seen plenty of shootouts with the R1M and the RF models but have failed to find a shootout on the regular models. Can anyone provide me some insight from actual seat time on these two machines? Advantages and disadvantages from being on both bikes?

    • TroySiahaan

      I don’t need to tell you how awesome the chassis and V4 engine are in the Aprilia. Stock-to-stock it also makes significantly more power than the R1 (see our 2015 literbike shootout). However, reflash the R1 ECU and you can gain a lot of that power back. R1 also sounds awesome and has a great electronics package. To me, both bikes would be great for what you want to do. The way I think of it, you’ll have to do some upgrades to the R1 whereas the Aprilia you can just hop on and start ripping. Normally I’d say go with the Aprilia, but since you already have a Tuono, maybe you’ll want a change of flavor with the R1?

      • Jacob Prusa

        Troy…thank you responding. That is my struggle, do I go with the RSV4 because I will be so use to the power delivery/chassis (which is good for confidence/lap times) or do I go with the R1 b/c the RSV4 is so similar to the Tuono and it will almost be like having two of the same bike. The first thing I will do to either bike is to put an exhaust system on it (probably the Austin Racing on either one as it has been great on my Tuono) and the Race ECU/reflash ECU. I have that already planned for both no matter which one I buy. It has never been this hard to chose which bike to buy, but I guess that just shows how great a time it is in motorcycles right now.

        • Steve Cole

          Just the looks of the R1 would seal the deal for me… against it. Droopy-eyed and catfish-faced with a mess of spars at the right footpeg. Three heat shields on the exhaust, which somehow looks rusted right away. Cheap-looking rear fairing that takes away space for any piggyback ECU or alarm system you might want to add. Least powerful brakes of any bike in its price range, too. Then there’s the fuelling…

          • Jacob Prusa

            Steve – I am impartial on the looks of either the R1 or the RSV4. I want to buy the bike that is the most capable between the two in the canyons and at the track. My use for this particular bike places more importance on the capabilities over the looks. At this point I am not leaning in any direction but the foot peg aesthetics you mentioned will be addressed on either bike because I will put aftermarket rear sets on either bike. The heat shield issues will also not be an issue because I am putting a full aftermarket exhaust setup on either bike. I would think doing the ECU reflash with the exhaust would correct the fueling. Having never ridden the new R1 I cant speak about the brakes but brakes extremely important to me and as important (probably more) is the suspension. I have not heard any suspension comparisons on the regular R1 vs. RR models. I don’t mind getting the RSV4 if it is the better bike for my purposes even though I have the Tuono and they are so similar.

            In almost every shootout that uses the R1M and RF the R1M (I know these are not what I am looking at but it is the closest comparison I can find) always seems to put out better lap times for the collective group. What is interesting is that when it comes to the part for the test riders to pick a bike if they had buy one with their own money almost all of them pick the RSV4 which by the numbers is a slower bike on the track. I find that so interesting.

          • Steve Cole

            Well, it isn’t a slower bike on the track. Several different comparisons had it as a faster bike, such as 1000PS. It all depends on the track, which is fairly easy to understand when you consider that the R1 has considerably lower final gearing. Top speed of the R1 is around 176mph measured and top speed of the RSV4 is 193mph measured (source: UK magazine), with both motors having similar rev ranges, that means a fair bit more “racey” gearing for the R1 on shorter tracks, whereas a track like Mosport, you’d have to gear the R1 up to hit its top speed. If you were racing either bike, you would pay a lot of attention to the final gearing for whatever track you’re on, anyway.

        • Kevin Duke

          Save yourself $17k and just take your Tuono to the track!

          • Jacob Prusa

            Oh come on Kevin…. There is no place for using common sense like that when it comes to motorcycles. My trailer has room for two bikes… The Tuono can tag along with the new bike to the track to get some track time too.

  • Phil Klostermen

    Hey Kwakasaki how’s about offering a baked naked version like the tuono. Quit giving us the massively watered down ninja 1000. Dude!