Nope, the blue helmet pictured is the C3 Pro, which German helmet maker Schuberth has been making since 2013. We got to attend a fun little media gathering last night for Schuberth’s all-new E1 Adventure helmet, which Schuberth wants you to know all about. What they don’t want are any images of it released to the public yet. We’ll play along as if everything’s perfectly normal.

“No photos!” says Schubert’s CFO, but he was just kidding. We could take photos, we just can’t publish them yet.

“No photos!” says Schubert’s CFO, but he was just kidding. We could take photos, we just can’t publish them yet.

Anyway, we’re told the new E1 Adventure modular is much like the C3, but with an adjustable beak to give that rugged off-roady look. Like the C3, it sports an internal sun visor, removable anti-microbial CoolMax liner, and adjustable chin and top vents which lead to a vacuum-style exit vent at the lower back of the liner, which Schuberth says moves more air more quietly than other venting systems. Schuberth talks not just about aerodynamics, but also aeroacoustics.

Is this the new E1? No, this is one of Schuberth’s military helmets, apparently tested in an actual riot. They also have an on-site shooting range at the factory in Deutschland.

Is this the new E1? No, this is one of Schuberth’s military helmets, apparently tested in an actual riot. They also have an on-site shooting range at the factory in Deutschland.

The shell shape, a couple of reps told us, is somewhere between a Shoei RF1200 and a long-intermediate Arai, like the Signet Q. Both of those are my lids of choice, and strolling around in the new E1 Adventure size L whilst sipping an inexpensive yet unripe cabernet for about 15 minutes gave me the impression it could be an equally happy place for my melon.

To be honest, I’ve never owned any Schuberth helmet, and I’d have to spend a day or two in one to form a real opinion. It does give off the same comfortable, secure, precision vibe those other top-line helmets do, for sure. According to Schuberth, Germany’s Motorrad magazine surveys have ranked its helmets #1 for the last ten years (also Held gloves, of which Schuberth is now official distributor). Not that nationalism is much of a thing in Germany.

Is this it? No, this is one of Schuberth’s F1 helmets after being subjected to the old Ricky Bobby open-flame test. The internal temperature must not exceed a certain number, for a certain length of time. Schuberth sponsors five F1 drivers.

Is this it? No, this is one of Schuberth’s F1 helmets after being subjected to the old Ricky Bobby open-flame test. The internal temperature must not exceed a certain number, for a certain length of time. Schuberth sponsors five F1 drivers.

In any case, the E1 seems like a very nice premium helmet, and we’re happy it’s a modular because once you start wearing them, it’s hard to go back without feeling claustrophobic. In fact, Schuberth claims its C3 Pro is the lightest flip-up on the market, at 1650 grams (58 ounces, Small shell, actual production weight may vary), as well as the quietest. For guys who need their communicators and Bluetooth things, the entire neckroll is replaceable with the SRC (Schuberth Rider Communication) System. For women who need that, even better, since there’s a women’s version of the C3 designed to better fit female facial characteristics, etc; we’re going to guess there’ll be an E1 ladies’ version also.

Is this the new E1 Adventure? No, this is the helmet Schuberth makes to tell enemy forces, ‘Come on in, the water’s fine! We were just leaving...’

Is this the new E1 Adventure? No, this is the helmet Schuberth makes to tell enemy forces, ‘Come on in, the water’s fine! We were just leaving…’

The E1 Adventure won’t be the cheapest helmet out there: We’re told to expect it to be around $800, also about the same as the C3 Pro.

It was nice of Irv Seaver BMW to bring out a few oldies for display. Schuberth’s been knocking out helmets in the Old Country since 1922, and says business has never been better.

It was nice of Irv Seaver BMW to bring out a few oldies for display. Schuberth’s been knocking out helmets in the Old Country since 1922, and says business has never been better.

Car guys aren’t all bad.

Car guys aren’t all bad.

  • JMDonald

    After years of wearing Arai I bought two C3 helmets before the Pro came out. One for me one for the wife. They were basically half the original cost. It fits perfect is quiet doesn’t fog and is super light. After seeing the UN helmet in the picture I may trade my C3 in for a UN version. Who needs a picture when you can use your imagination.

  • Old MOron

    They sponsor five F1 drivers, huh? I’ll consider their helmets when they sponsor motorcycle racers. They don’t even sponsor Stefan Bradl, for Christ’s sake.

  • DickRuble

    $800? I’ll stick with my HJC which I bought for $110, DOT and SNELL approved. All of the so called features of premium helmets aren’t worth a bag of crushed melon seeds if the helmet doesn’t fit your head shape.

    • Alexander Pityuk

      What’s the problem of getting a premium helmet that fits you? There are plenty of them. And all those “so called” features are indeed very measurable qualities that distinguish a superior helmet from a lesser one. Weight, design, aerodynamics, ventilation, graphics, liner, watertightness and noise to name few.
      Besides, DOT and SNELL are “passed” kind of ratings, so that doesn’t mean that two helmets are equal in safety despite having the same ratings.
      I’m not saying that your helmet is bad in any way, I just point out your weird logic.

      • DickRuble

        I tested multiple brands, including Arai, Shoei, and Bell. I was really hoping to buy Arai because of reviews in magazines (a dumb approach, as I was to discover a couple of years down the road). HJC was the only one that fit. And I do mean the others were really uncomfortable..

        Since you have the advantage of non-weird logic. please demonstrate to me and the rest of the audience that an $800 helmet is safer/better than a $110. Feel free to demonstrate the superior ventilation, waterproofing, and aerodynamics..use graphs to support your argument.

        • Bmwclay

          I bought a HJC ‘SyMax’ a few years ago and then I ran across the National Highway Transportation web site. The HJC failed in every performance tests. I returned it and got a Shoei.

          • DickRuble

            That was in 2001…. I use a CL-12 helmet.. couldn’t find any reference in the NHTSA database. Also, last testing seems to have been in 2008. Nothing more recent on their website, or at least I couldn’t find it.

          • Bmwclay

            Point is, HJC never recalled that failed helmet. It also had all the correct stickers They just kept on selling them. How many of the Symax (and other defective HJC’s are still out there? No one knows. As for the 110.00 cost, you can buy an entire tool set from Harbor Freight for 29 bucks, or a Snap-On ratchet for the same price.

          • DickRuble

            Read the SHARP helmet safety tests and scroll to the bottom. Let me know where the Schuberth helmets stand and whether your theory still stands. FYI, I could not find Schuberth helmets in the Snell certified helmet database.

          • tareqhassan

            I agreed with DickRuble. We always ensure that our brand new helmet pass the safety test and DOT approved.

            I’ve also found some great helmets on this blog http://mybestmotorcyclehelmet.com/

  • DickRuble

    Food for thought for the non-weird logic types with a severe case of Siberian brain freeze.. and others who think the more expensive the better..

    http://blm.io/blog/motorcycle-helmet-safety-price/

    Feel free to examine which brand has the worst score in the SHARP test (since DOT and SNELL are not good enough for some).

    • Alexander Pityuk

      1) Let’s not make it personal, okay?
      2) I never said that more expensive = more safe, learn to read. I said it may be.
      3) I’m not familiar with sharp test methodology. But I have seen something like this before in car industry, when some cars were getting superior results in euroncap tests than mercedes and volvo (which are kinda associated with safety), but the truth was that euroncap sucks, that’s why they didn’t care trying to get as many stars as possible, but rather focused on real life safety.
      4) My opinion is based on numerous reviews of professionals, including our MO.
      5) Go tell motoGP riders your theory, I’m pretty sure they will be delighted to know that they are wearing f&@#g shait, which Arai, the most popular motogp helmet, is.

  • Bmwclay

    I still use a Schuberth helmet on my 1150 GS, it works perfectly and is very convenient for group trail rides. However, when I got my K1200S, it sucked. WAY too much weight to support my neck in the lean forward position. Back to Shoei.

  • Lewis

    Such a stunning helmet! I wouldnt mind getting a schuberth, there are lots of good helmets here – http://www.elitehelmets.com/reviews/ some of my favorite.

  • https://helmetsworld.net Manh Tuong

    Schuberth helmet is great, I think there will be so many people choose to buy them, look at the 2nd picture can know the quality is very good hat. I have written about helmets at https://helmetsworld.net