Why not? This vinyl-covered steel cable makes it easy to hang two helmets from a single lock, and if it makes you feel more secure, the 18-inch version lets you loop it through the chin bars instead of just the D-rings. On the GSX-S1000 we played with the Snake on, you could just as easily use the other helmet lock under the other side of the passenger seat to hang two helmets, but the Helmet Snake makes things a bit more convenient and secure. And if your bike has any kind of luggage that makes the helmet lock hard to get to, the Snake is your answer.

Ask MO Anything: Which Motorcycles Have Helmet Locks?

The downside of that convenience on bikes like the GSX-S is that the 5mm cable leaves a gap between seat and bike that might encourage a low-life to shove some kind of lever in there and rip the passenger seat clean off.

But on a bike with a real old-fashioned helmet lock, the Snake would make it much less hazardous and awkward to lock up two helmets in one lock.

Under the red PVC plastic coating, the Snake is a pretty strong seven-strand stainless steel cable that’s 4.6mm thick. My 7-inch diagonal cutters got through the plastic coating, but couldn’t make a dent in the cable. A real jerk would probably have bolt cutters, which is my excuse for not having any on hand to test on the Snake.

It’s like bicycle locks these days: A professional thief will defeat any lock given a minute or two, but this one should keep the casual pilferer at bay. If you have a pair of really expensive helmets and you’re going to be gone for a while, good luck.

Anyway, given the very little storage required to carry a Helmet Snake around, and the low price of admission – $14.95 for the 18-incher and $12.95 for the 14-inch Snake – it’s a handy enough thing to keep on your bike not just for securing helmets but also for other unforeseen instances where a steel cable with loops on either end might be just the thing. Securing your Garfield to the back of your Gold Wing? High-tech wallet chain? Gerbil tug of war? Who knows?