Fieldsheer High Temp Mesh

Editor Score: 82.0%
Aesthetics 7.75/10
Protection 8.5/10
Value 8.25/10
Comfort/Fit 8.75/10
Quality/Design 8.5/10
Weight 8.0/10
Options/Selection 7.25/10
Innovation 8.5/10
Weather Suitability 8.75/10
Desirable/Cool Factor 7.75/10
Overall Score82/100

What better time to test the air-flowing capabilities of Fieldsheer’s High Temp Mesh Jacket and Pants than during California’s drought. On one particular trip we experienced “OMG it’s hot,” “who’s idea was this – it’s too hot,” and “get me off this f*&$ing motorcycle, hell isn’t this hot.” Fieldsheer’s mesh worked pretty darn good in two of the three degree variances.

Due to the wind protection from the copious amounts of fairing adorning the heavyweight sport-touring rigs we were aboard, real airflow wasn’t realized until standing on the pegs. Elevated thusly, the two-piece Fieldsheer suit flowed air (hot air, but better than no air) around my torso and legs.

The material from which the mesh is constructed is the impressively named Polytitanium mesh. According to Fieldsheer Polytitanium mesh is an ultra-breathable, high abrasion resistant polyester textile. Higher impact areas of both the jacket and pants are constructed from 500-denier Maxtena-Pro.

Even though the blacktop on which we rode was of tire-melting temperatures, we incurred no forced abrasion testing. So we’ll have to trust the claims of Fieldsheer regarding the abrasion resistance of the materials used in the construction of the High Temp Mesh suit. Further protection is provided by removable CE-approved armor for the elbows, shoulders and back in the jacket, and knees in the pants which also have non-CE-approved hip padding. Elbow armor is held in place via two, three-way adjustable sleeve snaps, while knee armor has three settings to ensure correct placement.

Maxtena-Pro, the material of which the outer shell of all Fieldsheer’s textile jackets are constructed, protects from abrasion while providing a smooth finish and high durability.

Maxtena-Pro, the material of which the outer shell of all Fieldsheer’s textile jackets are constructed, protects from abrasion while providing a smooth finish and high durability.

The jacket features two liners: a rain liner and a heat liner. The rain liner is constructed from a combination of Nanomax and Rainguard. Nanomax is waterproof while featuring claims of better breathability compared to similar products. Nanomax is said to also have a high mechanical strength and be resistant to oils, sweat and detergents. Where the rain liner attaches to the jacket, the insulation liner attaches to the rain liner. Internal pockets differ between jacket liners, forcing you to rearrange pocket contents when switching between liners.

A nice detail is the way in which the Nanomax and Rainguard liner zip to the end of the jacket sleeve instead of using snaps or button and loop attachments.

A nice detail is the way in which the Nanomax and Rainguard liner zip to the end of the jacket sleeve instead of using snaps or button and loop attachments.

The mesh pants and rain liner have full-length leg zippers for easy ingress/egress. Unlike the mesh jacket, however, the rain liner in the pants does not feature the Nanomax and Rainguard technologies, but a more plebeian waterproof liner that does not feature waterproof zippers. The seams of both the jacket and pants liners are sealed from leaks by the use of thermoplastic tape.

Both garments increase nighttime safety by stylishly sprinkling the reflective material Phoslite around in key areas. On the jacket, Phoslite is found across the shoulders and forearms, as well as in piping that runs the length of the sleeves. The pants feature a wide swath of Phoslite around the boot area, running up the outside of the shin.

Jacket sizing seemed spot-on, the Medium fitting me like a good Medium should. Sizes run from Small to 4XL Regular, and Medium to 4XL Tall. The pants also fit well, but I’d like to see a Tall version available (the inseam could use another inch). Pants sizes are Small to 4XL Regular, and Small to 3XL Short.

Jacket sizing seemed spot-on, the Medium fitting me like a good Medium should. Sizes run from Small to 4XL Regular, and Medium to 4XL Tall. The pants also fit well, but I’d like to see a Tall version available (the inseam could use another inch). Pants sizes are Small to 4XL Regular, and Small to 3XL Short.

At $299 for the Fieldsheer High Temp Mesh Jacket and $279 for the High Temp Mesh Pants, you’re staring at nearly $600 for the pair. Not exactly cheap, but the suit is more versatile than just the hot summer months in which we tested the combination. The jacket, with its rain and insulation liners, is especially adept for use in Spring and Fall temperatures. The pants don’t have an insulation liner (which they should to make this combo really enticing), but this can be dealt with in other ways.

Considering the change of season, it may be a good time to find a sweet deal on this combination and be ready for when the temperatures begin warming next Spring.

For more information or to purchase, check out www.Fieldsheer.com.

The Fiedlsheer High Temp Mesh Jacket is available in colors: Black, Blue, Gunmetal, High-Vis and Silver (pictured). The High Temp Mesh Pants in colors: Black, Silver (pictured).

The Fiedlsheer High Temp Mesh Jacket is available in colors: Black, Blue, Gunmetal, High-Vis and Silver (pictured). The High Temp Mesh Pants in colors: Black, Silver (pictured).

  • fastfreddie

    Can’t for the life of me understand why one buy expensive raingear,when basic 20$ pieces does the same job.How much do you sweat during rain sitting on a motorcycle?You don’t need gore-tex,just basic oilcloth you can stove away in underseat compartment.

    • http://norimek.com/blog Robert C. Barth

      Depends on where you live. In the southwest, it will rain cats & dogs and be > 90 degrees F out. You will sweat AND get soaked by the rain.

    • TonyCarlos

      Don’t know what you ride, but you obviously have far more underseat area than do I. Some of us can’t pack a pair of gloves under there, never mind a full set of oilcloth gear.

      • fastfreddie

        Granted,space on my bike isn’t at a premium,but you can get oilcloth that folds up so small it’ll fit into your pockets.

        Each to their own I guess.

  • michael franklin

    Polytitanium, Maxtena pro, phoslite,…. if the garments were only as good as the fancy names that mean nothing.