Yamaha has gotten good use out of its popular Bolt line, giving us the Bolt, the Bolt R-Spec, and the C-Spec. Now, the tuning fork company has recast the Bolt as a Scrambler. The SCR950 shares much with its Bolt brethren. The same engine and frame are used throughout the line. All sport a 19-inch front wheel and a 3.2 gallon tank – though the SCR’s is now seamless. You can bet this change will make it to the remainder of the line at some point. Still, you get the picture. Yamaha built a platform to support a line of models that could be created with minimal change to components and parts manifests in an effort to keep the price of the bikes down. With the MSRP ranging from $7,999 for the base Bolt to $8,699 for the SCR, the strategy appears to be successful.

2017 Yamaha SCR950 First Ride Review

2015 Star Bolt C-Spec First Ride Review + Video

2014 Star Bolt Vs. 2013 Harley-Davidson 883 Iron – Video

What makes the SCR950 different from its Bolt brothers is an all-new sub-frame that lifts the seat height 5.5 in., compared to the Bolt. The pegs are located in the same place as those on the C-Spec instead of the Bolt’s more forward position. The handlebar is a steel unit with a crossbar brace. Most importantly, the rear wheel grows to 17 in. and is shod with Bridgestone Trail Wing tire. All of these make the SCR an ideal mount for urban life and light off-road exploration. Only the limited suspension travel brings the SCR up short in its quest for all-around utility.

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So, take a gander at the video review of the 2017 Yamaha SCR950, and if you haven’t already, make sure you read the full review.

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  • aaMOron

    What, not one comment?

    I took a short ride on the SCR today and enjoyed the heck out of it. Finally, a cruiser with a standard riding position! I still hate the air cleaner jabbing the side of my leg, but the aftermarket usually has some low-profile boxes. It made me just want to bobble along at the speed limit instead of 10-15 over like on my Beemer. Riding a fast bike fast is great, as is a slow bike fast, but a slow bike slow ain’t so terrible.