2017 Yamaha FZ-10

Editor Score: 88.5%
Engine 19.0/20
Suspension/Handling 13.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 8.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 9.0/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 9.0/10
Overall Score88.5/100

One of the most hotly contested categories in motorcycling today, the liter-class streetfighter field has a contender from nearly every manufacturer out there. But if you’ve read the numerous streetfighter reviews posted on Motorcycle.com and other outlets, you’ll know that three models – super streetfighters, if you will – stand above the rest: the BMW S1000R, Aprilia Tuono V4 1100, and KTM Super Duke R.

Well, it’s time to add a fourth bike to the conversation: the 2017 Yamaha FZ-10.

More than just an R1 stripped down, the FZ-10 has all the elements that make the three European bikes above so special: striking looks, real-world comfort, and most importantly, mind-blowing performance. As an added bonus, the FZ’s $12,999 price tag is also highly competitive, besting the $14,799 Tuono V4 RR, $13,495 S1000R, and $16,999 Super Duke R.

Which leads us to the heart of the matter: the FZ-10’s 998cc Crossplane-crankshaft four-cylinder engine borrowed directly from the R1, with a few tweaks to make it better suited for the street. The idea here was to give the FZ more torque on the bottom and mid-range compared to the R1. To do that, the cylinder head sees new designs for the intake ports and combustion chamber. The FZ also gets new forged aluminum pistons. Together, these changes result in compression ratio dropping a point compared to the R1 from 13.0:1 to 12.0:1.

But the changes don’t end there. Smaller intake valves (31mm vs 33mm) compared to the R1 are now steel instead of titanium, the airbox is two liters larger (12L vs. 10L), and the FZ ditches the R1’s dual injectors for single injectors producing 25% more volume per pulse. The FZ also sees new intake and exhaust cams with reduced lift and duration compared to the R1, again to promote torque over horsepower. Other changes include a new crankshaft with a higher moment of inertia (marketing speak for heavier) to help reduce sudden movements due to jerky throttle inputs, steel connecting rods, and a reduction in diameter of the titanium muffler’s inner core, from 54mm to 42.6mm. Lastly, the FZ sees a new throttle body, needed to incorporate perhaps one of my favorite features on a streetbike: cruise control!

Say hello to the brash FZ-10, the flagship of the FZ line. Finally, Japan’s got a serious match for the European crop of super streetfighters. Available in Armor Gray (left) and Matte Raven Black.

Say hello to the brash FZ-10, the flagship of the FZ line. Finally, Japan’s got a serious match for the European crop of super streetfighters. Available in Armor Gray (left) and Matte Raven Black.

Generally, when the words “retuned for torque” are spoken about an engine, reactions vary from moans to sighs. Horsepower numbers are great for bragging rights, but when it comes to street riding, torque is what you want and the earlier you can get it the better. With that in mind, chew on this for a second: Yamaha claims that with the changes made to the FZ-10 engine, it makes 18% more torque in the midrange (at 7000 rpm, to be exact, looking at Yamaha’s dyno chart) and matches the R1’s peak torque number of 81.9 lb-ft at 9000 rpm. Internal gear ratios haven’t changed compared to the R1, but final-drive gearing is 5% lower.

After the engine, more changes were made in the electronics department as the FZ doesn’t feature the IMU seen in the R1. Despite this, the FZ still gets ABS and four-stage traction control (three levels plus off), easily toggled between with a thumb switch on the left bar. ABS comes standard and the front and rear brakes are not linked. Technically it isn’t switchable, but as with other bikes we’ve tested, turning off TC and performing a burnout (or dyno pull) is a backdoor method to disabling ABS.

The FZ-10 might be sourced from the current R1, but the two are vastly different when it comes to engine character. The FZ is all about torque, whereas the R1 likes to sing up top. 

The FZ-10 might be sourced from the current R1, but the two are vastly different when it comes to engine character. The FZ is all about torque, whereas the R1 likes to sing up top.

The FZ-10 retains the YCC-T-enabled drive modes seen on other Yamahas, but things get confusing as Yamaha has changed their meaning for reasons even Yamaha staff on hand couldn’t answer. The three modes – A, B, and Standard – all remain, only now B is the most aggressive setting, A is the middle setting, and Standard is the most benign. In the past A was most aggressive, Standard was the middle setting, and B was the softest. If this is the only bike you’ll own then it’s not very hard to get used to, but for owners of other recent Yamahas (or motojournalists in this case) who ride different models, it could take a while to adapt. Full power is still delivered no matter which mode you’re in, but the rate of butterfly opening is what changes in each mode.

Frame and chassis are largely the same between the R1 and FZ, though the FZ’s subframe is steel instead of magnesium to better accommodate luggage and a passenger. The FZ shares the same frame and KYB suspension as the R1, but the latter’s damping rates have been recalibrated for street use rather than track duty. Other minor differences include a steel fuel tank instead of the aluminum one on the R1, slightly lower pegs, and an LCD screen instead of the R1’s TFT display. While not as colorful as the TFT, the LCD screen is large and easy to read. The digital speedo reading dominates the display and is surrounded by a bar graph tach, fuel gauge, temperature reading (ambient and coolant), odometer and tripmeters, and ride modes, traction control and gear-position indicators. Not to mention the array of idiot lights on either side.

It's no TFT display, but at least the LCD gauge cluster is large, fairly easy to read, and filled with all the necessary information.

It’s no TFT display, but at least the LCD gauge cluster is large, fairly easy to read, and filled with all the necessary information.

Two nods to the FZ’s street versatility are the addition of cruise control and a 12-volt outlet located behind the headlights. The controls for the cruise control are identical to that seen on the FJR1300 sport-tourer and operate in fourth through sixth gears, starting at 30 mph all the way to 112 mph. The power outlet is useful to keep GPS devices charged or to power heated clothing on colder rides. While not specifically aimed towards the sport-touring crowd, Yamaha wouldn’t rule out the FZ-10 should your long-distance riding lean more towards the sporty side of the touring spectrum. And with the addition of Yamaha’s accessory windscreen, top case and saddlebags developed for the FZ, setting the cruise control and burning away the miles isn’t out of the question.

So How Does It Ride Already?

But enough with the specs and touring fluff. You want to know how the FZ is to ride. To find out, Yamaha invited journalists to the (in)famous Tail of the Dragon on the Tennessee/North Carolina border. Otherwise known as US-129, 318 turns are packed into this 11-mile stretch of road packs and is one of the most well known sport riding roads in the country, if not the world.

If you haven't been to the Tail of the Dragon before, picture 11 miles of this. If you have roads like this near you, then the FZ-10 will be at home.

If you haven’t been to the Tail of the Dragon before, picture 11 miles of this. If you have roads like this near you, then the FZ-10 will be at home.

To say the FZ was in its element would be an understatement. The revised engine is an absolute ripper, its bump in mid-range torque instantly noticeable in this real-world riding environment. No matter the ride mode, once the revs are anywhere near the 7,000 mark, a whack of the throttle and a tug on the bars will bring the front end in the air. I’ll be the first to admit I stink at wheelies, but even I was able to hoist dank whoolies even in third gear. No clutch required.

The engine unsurprisingly signs off near its 12,200 rpm redline, but with its fat torque curve you’ll want to shift before then anyway. Despite the fact it’s not equipped with a quickshifter, if you didn’t need to breathe the throttle to upshift, you’d never know. Gear changes in either direction, but especially up, are like my favorite summer beer: smooth, light, and crisp. As far as the ride modes go, B mode, the most aggressive, is still far too twitchy for my taste. The A mode is a little more manageable, but for 80% of the ride I kept it in Standard, switching over if I wanted to wheelie out of every corner instead of just every other one.

Those wide bars are the perfect width for tossing the FZ into bends. Exhaust headers are now stainless steel instead of titanium on the R1. It may not be as light or exotic as the Ti piece, but it doesn't diminish from the FZ's awesome sound! The Transformer headlight looks better in person than it does in pictures, too.

Those wide bars are the perfect width for tossing the FZ into bends. Exhaust headers are now stainless steel instead of titanium on the R1. It may not be as light or exotic as the Ti piece, but it doesn’t diminish from the FZ’s awesome sound! The Transformer headlight looks better in person than it does in pictures, too.

Of course all of this is ignoring the biggest reason you’d want to constantly rev the R1: that sound! The exhaust note that Crossplane crank belts out is wonderfully intoxicating, and for those moments when it was bouncing off the hills and through the trees of the North Carolina landscape, it was like being in my own little slice of heaven. Without a doubt, in terms of both power, sound and fun factor, I’d line up the FZ-10 engine against the likes of the Super Duke R, S1000R, and Tuono V4. It’s definitely on par with the Europeans and a step above the other Japanese contenders.

On the handling front, the FZ-10 shares the same 24.0º rake and 102mm trail as the R1, but wheelbase is slightly shorter (55.1 in. vs. 55.3 in.). I sure as heck couldn’t tell you if the FZ’s shorter wheelbase helps it turn any faster than the R1 without riding them back-to-back, but what I can tell you is that the FZ is pleasantly light on its feet. At a claimed 463 lbs. wet, the FZ is lighter than the Super Duke (470 lbs.) and Tuono (469 lbs.), but just slightly heavier than the S1000R (450 lbs.). Regardless, its agility seems on par with the European super streetfighters. The bars are just the right width in my opinion; wide enough to give good leverage, but not overly so. Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S20 tires were specially developed for the bike. A 120/70-17 sits in front, with a 190/55-17 in the rear.

Smooth pavement like this is hardly a test for the KYB suspension on the FZ, though rougher patches were simply absorbed by the fork and shock while allowing the bike to continue on its path. The fork's preload, compression and rebound adjustments are all available at the top of the fork tube. 

Smooth pavement like this is hardly a test for the KYB suspension on the FZ, though rougher patches were simply absorbed by the fork and shock while allowing the bike to continue on its path. The fork’s preload, compression and rebound adjustments are all available at the top of the fork tube.

I was especially impressed with the Yamaha’s KYB suspension. Both ends are fully adjustable for preload, rebound, and compression damping, with the shock also featuring adjustable circuits for both high- and low-speed compression. While not top-shelf Ohlins or WP units, the KYB stuff easily soaked up the bumps on the Dragon’s Tail while minimally upsetting the chassis. Even mid-corner, the FZ would simply absorb the hit and continue on its arc. Admittedly, “bumps” on the well maintained Tail of the Dragon are nothing like some of the huge ripples in other parts of the country, so a true test of the suspension will have to wait. While not necessarily a negative, the FZ’s overall damping feels softer than what I remember from the KTM and the Aprilia.

Apart from the confusing ride modes, the FZ’s biggest downfall is its brakes. The hardware is all there, with dual 320mm discs clamped by Advics radial-mounted four-piston calipers fed via a Brembo radial master cylinder, but the hoses are rubber and ultimately brake lever feel is a little soft. Overall braking power is never in question though, I just wish I could have a little more feedback at the lever.

The FZ-10 is so playful and confidence-inspiring, you can't help but want to do silly things on it. Fun fact: the intake scoops on either side of the headlight are not functional. This is partially the reason for the larger airbox compared to the R1 – to help compensate for the reduced ram-air effect.

The FZ-10 is so playful and confidence-inspiring, you can’t help but want to do silly things on it. Fun fact: the intake scoops on either side of the headlight are not functional. This is partially the reason for the larger airbox compared to the R1 – to help compensate for the reduced ram-air effect.

Our ride also included a short highway stint, where the FZ proved to be a pleasant everyday bike as well. The rider triangle is obviously much more upright compared to the R1, with the bars 42.2 inches from the ground compared to 32.0 inches on the R1. Pegs are also lower: 13.6 inches to the tarmac versus 15.9 inches on the R and slightly more forward too. The seat is broad in its rearward section, tapering towards the front with decent padding, though Iron Butters will probably want to opt for the accessory seat option. At these lower speeds I also noticed a fair amount of engine heat radiating to my legs. It didn’t reach Ducati Panigale levels, but it was definitely noticeable.

Time for another shootout

The first time I rode the current generation Yamaha YZF-R1 on the street, I throttled out of my driveway and by the time I rolled to the stop sign at the corner, I hated the bike. The bars were low, the pegs high, and the seat was thinly padded. To make matters worse, after a few more miles it was obvious the engine was tuned for the high-speed confines of the racetrack. It seemed bored with the more mundane pace of the real world.

Without a doubt, the FZ-10 has what it takes to compete with the best in the class. Whether it has enough to beat them is another matter. Regardless, this is the best streetfighter to come out of Japan since the video game.

Without a doubt, the FZ-10 has what it takes to compete with the best in the class. Whether it has enough to beat them is another matter. Regardless, this is the best streetfighter to come out of Japan since the video game.

The FZ-10 changes all of that. It’s comfortable for the everyday roles of a streetbike, has all the performance you want on the street, and to me, has the looks to back it up. Styling is clearly a subjective issue, but the polarizing anime-inspired design of the FZ definitely looks better in person than in pictures.

I’m stopping short of making any predictions on how the Yamaha would stack up against the other three super streetfighters, but I’m confident it’ll hold its own. This clearly means we’ll have to get the quartet together to see how they shake out. Excited? You should be.

2017 Yamaha FZ-10
+ Highs

  • That sound!
  • Excellent mid-range torque
  • Cruise control
– Sighs

  • Brake lever a little soft
  • Excess engine heat
  • Ride modes are really confusing
2017 Yamaha FZ-10 Specifications
Price $12,999
Engine Liquid-cooled, DOHC, 16-valves (4-valves/cyl), inline four-cylinder
Displacement 998cc
Bore and Stroke 79 x 50.9 mm
Compression Ratio 12:1
Fuel Delivery Fuel injection with YCC-T
Ignition TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission 6-speed; wet multiplate assist-and-slipper clutch
Final Drive Chain
Front Suspension 43mm KYB inverted fork, fully adjustable; 4.7-
in travel
Rear Suspension KYB single shock w/piggyback reservoir, fully
adjustable; 4.7-in travel
Front Brakes Dual hydraulic disc, 320mm; ABS
Rear Brakes Hydraulic disc, 220mm; ABS
Front Tires 120/70ZR17
Rear Tires 190/55ZR17
L x W x H 82.5 in. x 31.5 in. x 43.7 in.
Seat Height 32.5 in.
Wheelbase 55.1 in.
Rake 24°
Trail 4.0 in.
Ground Clearance 5.1 in.
Fuel Capacity 4.5 US gallons
Wet Weight (Claimed) 463 lb.
Warranty 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
Colors Armor Gray; Matte Raven Black

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Yamaha Communities

  • Old MOron

    “Gear changes in either direction, but especially up, are like my favorite summer beer: smooth, light, and crisp.”

    Great review, Trizzle. And you’re turning into a regular Serge Nuques in the corners. I’m going to raise a nice pilsner to you today. It’s going to be a hot weekend. I might drink to you more than once :-)

    • TroySiahaan

      Ha! I’m far from Serge Nuques in the skills department, but I can fake it on camera for a corner or two! Cheers!

  • Y.A.

    Obviously the MT-10 completely washes the other Japanese bikes on the character front- no question about that. How does it compare in speed and handling to them though?

    I don’t know if I could ever get past this thing’s looks…. an extra $1000 for an XSR version would be worth every dollar

    • TroySiahaan

      IMO, compared to the Japanese bikes, the FZ/MT-10 cleans house in basically every category except brakes.

  • DickRuble

    “the intake scoops on either side of the headlight are not functional. This is partially the reason for “.. ignoring this (hideous) bike and teaching Yamaha to treat design seriously.

    • Old MOron

      You know, Bigus Dickus, you’re prolly right on both counts.
      Bush league phony baloney.
      And since it’s a naked bike, aside from causing instability, they probably don’t care about aerodynamics.

    • TroySiahaan

      Ignoring an otherwise awesome motorcycle because of fake scoops? That’s like ignoring the most stunning supermodel because she (or he, this is 2016 after all) has weird ear piercings.

      • DickRuble

        No, it’s like ignoring a supermodel because she has syphilis.

        • Martin Buck

          Oh, I get it. Call it ugly and impractical, and Yamaha showrooms will be infested with unsold FZ-10s, stinking the place up until some noble citizen makes the ultimate sacrifice and offers to take one of them off their hands at half price as a, like, favor. Nice call, Dick, I’ll be right behind you in line.

          • DickRuble

            No, no.. after you.. ladies first..

          • Martin Buck

            Yeah, I kinda like VTwins meself. They suit my deliberate pace better than frenetic fours. There’s always time to get there.

          • john burns

            Dick’s buying a Buell SX when they get down to $10k. Wait!

          • DickRuble

            I would buy an SX before I buy a 1000cc inline 4, you got that right.

          • john burns

            tho it’s a very large “would”

          • DickRuble

            Are they still convulsing? An update would be nice..

          • Tinwoods

            Because you can’t handle a liter bike it sounds.Moped, eayh, clearly more your speed.

          • Tinwoods

            What a miserable person you are. Yes, I’m sure you would be right behind a dick in line.

        • Ulysses Araujo

          I heard there’s a saying fake boobs are fake until you’re in the same room with them.

        • Tinwoods

          Syphilis? So you’re saying these harmless little scoops are the equivalent of a deadly disease? You drama queens are out in force today.

          • TroySiahaan

            Lol. I like you.

          • DickRuble

            You two have a lot in common…

    • Tinwoods

      You pussies getting your panties all up in a bunch over… plastic. Scoops. Pathetic.

  • Ser Samsquamsh

    Another bike I wouldn’t trust myself with!

  • gjw1992

    I like the looks – not pretty but certainly attractive. But given how prominent they are, I’m a little offended those scoops don’t do anything practical. This fz10/mt10 could be the one to buy with Yamaha’s build quality and reliability usually being above everyone else’s – assuming this thing is built in Japan(?)

    • Ian Parkes

      “…Yamaha’s build quality being above everyone else’s…” Really? UK Bike magazine reported that after one winter with their long term test MT-07, many steel bits had furred up and rust broke through the paint on a weld and in other places. Even after they started their tenure soaking the bike with protective goo which had kept many other long-term bikes pristine. Build quality on the MT line was their biggest complaint.

      • gjw1992

        That’s why I wondered where it’s made – the mt07/mt09 are much cheaper than the old 4cyl fz&xj’s – so I suppose while recent product is more fun it’s not as well put together.

      • Auphliam

        It seems nearly all the complaints about rust and whatnot are from UK owners. While many of them attribute it to their damp winters & the sticky molasses/salt mix used to treat the roads, I wonder if it’s a supply and/or build issue for bikes sold in that part of the world. I’ve not found any accounts of US owned bikes experiencing the same.

        • DickRuble

          Not sure about UK, but in France motorcycles are means of transportation, not garage queens. The said motos spend all their lives outside, rain or shine, ’cause in Paris few want to rent a garage for a bike. If the UK riders have the same approach, it makes sense that their rides would rust a lot faster than those pampered in US garages and who see pavement only on Dunkin Donut day.

          • Ian Parkes

            Yep, it’s a tougher environment there – the point was that other marques could handle it.

          • DickRuble

            If there is a rust problem, the issue lies with the suppliers. Manufacturers are using multiple suppliers for their parts and it may be that some models are using parts from cheaper suppliers.

          • Ian Parkes

            It wasn’t just fasteners that furred and bolted on bits like the horn that rusted, although they did – it was frame welds too. I don’t want to come across as anti-Yamaha but putting out amazing bikes at great prices ain’t magic – it’s looking likely that this is where they made the savings.

          • Born to Ride

            I’m an American rider that uses my bikes as my primary mode of transportation. I do not have issues with rust, and would be royally pissed if I bought a brand new bike of any make and proceeded to have the fasteners corrode on me. I do however live in southern California so my bikes don’t see rain like I imagine a UK rider’s bike would be subjected to.

            Also, you being French explains why you love to fart in everyone’s general direction. Thanks for clearing that up for us.

          • DickRuble

            It’s this kind a flawed logical inference and your broadcasting it that has people fart all over you. I am American.

          • Born to Ride

            So why refer to the French and their apparent philosophy of use for motorcycles with panache worthy of nationalism. Seems kind of random and illogical to do so without having a personal tie to their culture. But you’re right, I was foolish to believe that your ramblings carry any semblance of rationality. You just like to spout any subversive nonsense that comes to mind.

  • JMDonald

    I was all set to really like this bike until the false scoops came up. WTFO? I guess I am a naked street fighter motorcyclist. These bikes do more for me than practically any other bike out there. The false scoops kill it for me. F^€£ers.

    • Old MOron

      Being the old f^€£er that I am, I had to google WTFO.
      At first I thought you had mistakenly contracted WTF and WFO. We’re on a moto sight, after all.
      Now I’ve learned about the “over” addition to WTF.
      I like it. Wouldn’t it be cool if some Yammie chap chimed in here with an explanation?

      • Allison Sullivan

        Like the one that they had for the ride modes being arse-about-face to every other model they make, you mean?

    • Tinwoods

      Scoops? Scoops killed it for you? Hahahahah…

      • JMDonald

        Yeah, they did. I don’t think the scoops on the VMax are functional either. What is it with Yamaha? For those needing to create an identity for themselves fake scoops are a good way to go. I don’t like them on sports cars either.

        • DickRuble

          Well, I must admit that Yamaha is right with the fake scoops. Even though a naked I4 is not my cup of tea, my initial impulse was to defend potential clients. I now understand that the fake scoops make sense because, as seen from some of the comments, there are enough cretins out there that appreciate them. Yamaha apparently know their target client base.

        • Born to Ride

          False. The scoops on the VMax are 100% real. You can even feel them up to be sure. She won’t mind

      • Born to Ride

        Right? I feel like I have this conversation regularly with people that think the hood scoops on all the turbocharged subarus are the biggest turn off. But then again, most people don’t realize that those good scoops actually feed the intercoolers.

        • DickRuble

          Except for old ’97 outbacks where they don’t feed anything. I know because I owned one.

    • TroySiahaan

      Something to think about: The R1 has fairings to hide all the hardware, electronics and associated wiring today’s bikes come with. Even though the FZ-10 has less tech, it still has tech. How do you package all that on the FZ? Where would all the hardware go? Everything’s exposed, except the area behind the scoops. And under the seat.

      • JMDonald

        Good point. Hiding technology behind a functional fairing, I’m all in. Fake scoops are a lie. It is lazy and misguided to use them. False aesthetics are exactly that and diminish an otherwise fine machine. Honestly, I like the new FZ. There is no denying the appeal and the features of this bike especially at that price point. Not exactly apples to apples but I would rather have a Speed Triple R. It looks just fine without fake scoops. Of course this is only my opinion.

        [URL=http://s1026.photobucket.com/user/jdonald1/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2016-07/58360640-F8D5-4893-ADAC-F2A62894820A_zps499ctt5i.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1026.photobucket.com/albums/y325/jdonald1/Mobile%20Uploads/2016-07/58360640-F8D5-4893-ADAC-F2A62894820A_zps499ctt5i.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

  • kenneth_moore

    Great review. I’ve been interested in this bike since the first spy shots. I don’t know if it can replace the FJ until I get a chance to sit on one and see how drastic the knee bend for the pegs is. It be cool as hell to fix one up with bags and a screen for next year’s trip to the Cherohala Skyway.) And cruise control…man I wish the FJ had it.

    No mention of Ducati in the Street Fighter list…doesn’t the Monster 1200 fit in?

    • TroySiahaan

      The Monster 1200 is certainly a steetfighter, but I think I might have created a new sub-category with this story – the super streetfighters. In this upper echelon sits three bikes: the 1290 Super Duke, S1000R, and Tuono V4 1100. Now there’s a fourth: the FZ-10.

      • Billy Jack

        What about the Monster 1200r? Same claimed horsepower (160hp ) as the S1000R, but with even more torque (97 ft/lb, claimed). Is it really not in the same category as the other three (or, now, four)?

      • kenneth_moore

        I recalled Ducati had a series actually called “Streetfighter” at Daytona Beach years ago. It looks like one 2009 model made 156bhp/85ft-lbs, then they stepped it down to an 800-cc range engine. I didn’t do a comprehensive search, so there may have been others. I don’t see any Streetfighters in their current US lineup. Perhaps they were replaced by the Hyperstradas?

        If they did ditch that model name and series, it seems in hindsight to have been a mistake.

        • TroySiahaan

          Ducati tried an experiment wherein it separated the Monster line. Air-cooled engines went to the Monster. Liquid-cooled engines to a new line called the Streetfighter, which is the bike you’re thinking of, I assume. It used the 1098 engine. I was never a big fan of that bike, and apparently the public wasn’t either. Neither were they a fan of Monsters not getting liquid-cooled engines. Ducati listened and now the Monsters have big liquid-cooled Twins again and the Streetfighter is gone.

          • Kevin Duke

            And the Streetfighter 848 was in Ducati’s lineup from 2012 to 2015, and I preferred that one to the little-loved 1098 Streetfighter.

          • randy the great

            Why is that? Just by virtue of the bike, one would assume that bigger is better, since…you know… Streetfighter.

          • Kevin Duke

            Few liked the handling of the 1098 version when ridden on the street. The 848 version had much better balance.

          • randy the great

            Gotcha. Thanks for following up.

          • Born to Ride

            Meh, there is a large Ducatisti contingent that contends that the new bikes are, for better or worse, Diavels with more rear set pegs and a proper rear tire. The last true monster was the 1100 evo. However, I will recognize that from a performance standpoint, the new bikes are more comfortable and more capable. 1200R is a riot and faaar more confidence inspiring than the Streetfighter S could ever dream of.

      • randy the great

        Troy, Tuono V4 vs the FZ-10, sound department only.. Which one takes it?

        • TroySiahaan

          That’s like asking which of my children (assuming I had more than one) I love more.

          • randy the great

            You know you have a (theoretical) favorite. :)

        • Kevin Duke

          Nothing sounds better than the Aprilia V-4, IMO.

      • Kevin Duke

        Or five if you include the Monster 1200R…

        • Kevin Duke

          Or six if you throw in the Buell…

  • TheMarvelous1310

    $12,999 and they could still afford to include fake scoops? Impressive! Yamaha always gives the goods.

  • Gabriel Owens

    From day one, I hated the looks of this bike. It grew on me quickly. Styling in this segment is without a doubt subjective anyway. For the money this might be the best of the bunch. I always had Japanese bikes till my last 2 are KTMs. I’ll admit the ktms are great bikes, but the reliability is nowhere near Yamaha’s. After my warranty expires on my Super A I’m going back to yamaha for good. Yamaha is absolutely killing it in the motorsports industry. I want to be a part of that excitement, but I’m under warranty till 2018. Ouch.

  • spiff

    I would like to see a test between this and the competitions 2016 left overs. Price gets much closer if that is done. I know everyone else has said it, but fake scoops suck. Why not make them functional?

  • Ulysses Araujo

    I call for an ugly headlight comparo! Seriously though, the FZ and the Speed Triple are comparable by a few metrics (displacement, price, intended use) even if in hp the Yammie seems to have the upper hand.

  • john phyyt

    Thank you for your wonderful impressions, Troy. I like the pic of the bike slightly
    sideways on corner ; I assume TC was disabled ,still it shows just
    how playful these hyper-powerful bikes really are. I am a long time
    FZ 09 rider and I have lined up a test ride as soon as I can . I
    love these bikes and I like Yamaha and may well buy one.

    I had a long chat to the salesman who has just bought XSR 09 after an FZ. He heaped praise on the new bike, and loved every aspect EXCEPT. He said I may
    be a little disappointed at the lack of immediate snap low in the
    rev range . I know this sounds stupid from a Masters of Torque,
    liter, Bike . and that this bike really honks and will raise its
    front wheel in third gear from 7000 rpm. BUT around town and at
    speed below 60 the littler FZ may still hold its own. Time will tell.

    As for False scoops. Fits right in with the Muscle F-U aesthetic. No one is forcing you
    to buy a $13,000 toy . And no one is saying That the Duc, Triumph,
    KTM, Aprilia, Suzuki etc are not really great bikes. Another
    excellent article from motorcycle.com. More power to you guys. Bring on the Comparison

    • TroySiahaan

      Glad you enjoyed the review. Yes, TC was disabled, but TC only works on acceleration. I was scrubbing off speed in that pic.

      IMO there’s enough power at normal street speeds to not leave you wanting.

  • Craig Hoffman

    Thrilled to hear reports that this bike has great power and good quality suspension. The FZ10 is the first for real no fooling around streetfighter to come out of Japan. It is priced right and will no doubt prove to be reliable and easy to keep. I hope Yamaha sells lots of them and that the other Japanese makers take notice.

    • Stan Talago

      Incorrect Craig Hoffman. The first no fooling around streetfighter to come out of japan is the FZ-09. From what I gather I bet a dollar to a doughnut the 09 is a better around town bike. Better low end and an attitude to boot.

      • Craig Hoffman

        Not bashing it as the ’09 is a cool and praiseworthy bike with a great engine, but it has budget suspension and 115 or so horsepower. Comparing an ’09 to the FZ-10 is akin to comparing a hand grenade to a nuclear bomb. Both are explosive, but they are not remotely in the same league. Where the ’09 gets a bit light in the front end and flighty at 115 mph, the 10 rears back and cranks a power wheelie…

  • Alexander Pityuk

    Why can’t I find horsepower numbers? Yamaha didn’t declare them?

    • TroySiahaan

      Correct.

  • Auphliam

    I love this bike…fake scoops and all. You can keep the day glow wheels though. That all black piece with the red highlights is SMOKIN!

  • Chris

    Nice inclusion of the engine heat issue. That’s a real world issue for folks that is often ignored (or played down). I’d also love to have seen some mpg figures. Though that’s not the gist of the bike (I certainly get it.), it’s also a real world concern for those that ride a lot…and THE reason I’ll never have another Tuono. It’s 2016 and these things cost real money: no more toasting engines and no more 20’s, or low 30’s, mpg’s. I don’t suspect this FZ will be a big problem in either of those areas, but I’m watching. Sounds like a hoot, a relative bargain, and typically Japanese easy-to-own. Keep the details coming.

    • TroySiahaan

      We were flogging the crap out of these bikes through the Dragon, and at our gas stop the math came out to 30 mpg. At more mundane speeds and normal riding, my guess is 10 mpg better.

      • Chris

        I was hoping for mid 40’s in commuter mode (When riding hard, I don’t really care what it gets.). We’ll see what details fill in. Thanks much for the follow-up.

    • Allison Sullivan

      I’ve got two friends in the UK with these, and both of them are very disappointed with the fuel consumption so far. They’re hoping it might improve a little as they break in, but 30mpg just cruising around seems to be about as good as it gets.

      • Chris

        Yeow! If that’s the case, I’m out. Hopefully, that won’t be the case. I could see high 30’s being as good as it gets, but 30 sounds too low. Again, we shall see…Thanks much.

  • Buzz

    I am really liking this and have officially put it on my List.