Carrying the banner of the Bonneville’s racing heritage, Triumph looked to the Thruxton, appropriately taken from the 500-mile racing series that first helped garner the Bonnie’s racing cred. While, as with all the new Bonnevilles, the authentic appearance is important, the primary emphasis with the 2016 Triumph Thruxton and the R was on power and handling.

Be sure to visit our 2016 Triumph Bonneville landing page to learn more about the background and details of the new Thruxton’s engine and chassis, including discussions with engineers who brought this critically important new platform to life for Triumph.

To take care of the power of the Thruxton, Triumph massaged the engine into what it calls the 1200cc “high power” state of tuning. While the 1200cc parallel-Twin maintains its same basic eight-valve configuration, the performance increase comes from the “low inertia” components, including a lighter crankshaft, higher compression head, high-flowing intake and exhaust, plus revised EFI tuning with sports mapping (in addition to the Rain, Road, and Sport ride modes). The resulting 82.6 lb-ft of torque at 4950 rpm is a whopping 62% more torque than on the previous Thruxton. (Since the 1200cc engine is 38% bigger than the existing 865 mill, even in an identical state of tune to the old engine, one would expect about a 40% bump in torque from the increase in displacement alone.) Also, note the higher rpm of the torque peak which points to the revvier nature of the engine. This type of jump in power would be difficult to achieve without the upgrade to liquid-cooling.

The Thruxton R adds a Showa fork, Brembo brakes, and Öhlins shocks for the ultimate in Bonneville-based performance.

The Thruxton R adds a Showa fork, Brembo brakes, and Öhlins shocks for the ultimate in Bonneville-based performance.

While the information on how Triumph sharpened the handling of the Thruxton is scarce, we know, thanks to information from the chief engineer, that the Thruxton and the R have significantly steeper sub-23° rake. Also, one of the few specifications revealed at the unveiling is that both front and rear wheels will be 17-in. spoked units wearing Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa skins.

Suspension and brake components separate the Thruxton from the Thruxton R. While the Thruxton appears to use twin shocks with ramped preload adjusters and the same dual-disc, two-piston calipers on the front wheel, the R model gets some of that ever-so-sexy gold on its suspension components. The fully-adjustable, inverted Showa fork takes care of the front, while a pair of Öhlins fully-adjustable piggyback shocks handle the rear. Braking duties are dispatched with dual Brembo floating front discs and a pair of Brembo monoblock four-piston calipers!

Sexy Brembo monoblock calipers and full-floating discs!

Sexy Brembo monoblock calipers and full-floating discs!

Both Thruxtons receive the same dual analog instruments with LCD menu system for heated grips setting (Thruxton accessory only), cruise control (Thruxton accessory only), ride mode, gear-position indicator, dual tripmeters, range to empty, fuel level, average and current MPG, service indicator, and access to deactivate traction control and ABS.

The Thruxton pair’s styling can be described as high-gloss café racer. With details like an aluminum tank strap, clip-on handlebars, and slightly rearset pegs, the street racing heritage is on full display. The R ups the gain with a painted seat cowl, a clever Monza-style gas cap cover that flips open to reveal a locking gas cap, a clear anodized aluminum swingarm, and a polished top triple clamp. Not surprisingly, the riding position of the Thruxtons is the most aggressive of the new Bonneville family.

The clip-on bars give the Thruxton and the Thruxton R the most aggressive riding position of the Bonneville family.

The clip-on bars give the Thruxton and the Thruxton R the most aggressive riding position of the Bonneville family.

The Thruxton’s paint schemes are suitably racy in Jet Black /Pure White, with a black tank stripe and the de rigueur Competition Green, with a metallic gold tank stripe. The R goes for bold solid colors with the Diablo Red and Silver Ice choices. By now, readers should expect a Thruxton Inspiration Kit, and Triumph delivers with three options. The Track Racer kit includes a sculpted dolphin fairing with lower clip-on handlebars, a painted seat cowl (included on the stock Thruxton R), rear fender  removal kit with compact light, LED turn signals, Vance & Hines slip-on mufflers, knurled handlebar grips, and a leather tank strap. The Café Racer inspiration kit receives a tinted flyscreen in place of the fairing in the Track Racer kit.

The Thruxton R Track Racer Inspiration Kit.

The Thruxton R Track Racer Inspiration Kit.

However, the most intriguing inspiration kit is the Thruxton R-specific race kit. Yes, that’s right, Triumph is releasing a race-only power kit for taking the R to the track. The items in the kit will be stainless headers with no catalytic converter, stainless open megaphone exhaust, race-spec cam, race-spec washable air filter, and clip-on handlebars. These should be pretty tasty additions to the Thruxton R.

102715-2016-triumph-Thruxton R Diablo Red Right

While we appreciate Triumph releasing any information about the Thruxtons, we’ll all just have to wait until next January to find out the details.

Triumph Announces Three New Engine Configurations and Five All-New Models for 2016 Bonneville Line

2016 Triumph Street Twin

2016 Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black

Free Insurance Quote

Enter your ZIP code below to get a free insurance quote.

Triumph Dealer Price Quote

Get price quotes for Triumph Bonneville from local motorcycle dealers.

Triumph Communities

  • Larry

    Very nice. Lose the silver and put the competition green on the R version and you’ll have something really sweet.

  • SRMark

    My Buell S2 turns 20 this year. Time to give it a rest. The T120 should take me to the end of my riding days. A sidecar would let me tote around the grandkids in style with enough power to get out of the way of traffic. Now if Triumph could get rid of that tank flange…

  • Montana dave

    Agree Larry. 60/70’s vintage Bonnies had one one of the most beautiful shaped tanks ever made. The flange,probable cheaper to make, always sticks out like a sore thumb. These 1200’s,especially if water cooled,must add allot of pork. Guess bigger engines and more weight equals “progress?” Can’t handle like the light weight originals. Looks like they put allot of time and work in these models though.
    Whatever happened to new “Norton?” Did it die once again?

    • John Sumser

      I am always disappointed by the weight of the new Triumphs but as for handling, the new ones will stomp the older ones on any mountain road.

  • Montana dave

    Agree Larry. 60/70’s vintage Bonnies had one one of the most beautiful shaped tanks ever made. The flange,probable cheaper to make, always sticks out like a sore thumb. These 1200’s,especially if water cooled,must add allot of pork. Guess bigger engines and more weight equals “progress?” Can’t handle like the light weight originals. Looks like they put allot of time and work in these models though.
    Whatever happened to new “Norton?” Did it die once again?

  • JMDonald

    I cannot help myself. Regardless of the truth in the pudding this style of bike was the one that brought me into motorcycling as a kid. I love these things.

  • notfishing

    Looks like Triumph is going to out-Norton. Hopefully the weight of these bikes will be kept down some we really don’t want to get into the “heavy cruiser” weight class.

  • Craig Hoffman

    The Thruxton R looks sweet. I could do without the seam in the tank, but it will be interesting to read about these. Could be one of those more than the sum of it’s parts kind of bikes, an antidote to the narrow focus escalation exemplified by the latest super sports. The previous 885cc Bonnevilles bore me to tears, but these revitalized and tuned up Thruxton 1200s look like in scale bikes that pack a decent but not overwhelming wallop and would actually be fun to ride.

    Truth be told, I just don’t need a 185 hp missile to go for a sporty street ride. Gimme easy but plentiful torque that can punt me up to 125 mph on that remote canyon road and it is all good. Current super sport bikes are just waking up at 125 mph, while I am done at that speed, furtively looking around to see if a cop is lying in wait, ready to toss me in jail. The new Triumphs may just fill my need to sport around at what is already too fast a speed perfectly.

  • Born to Ride

    Whoa, whoa, whoa. You mean to tell me that this bike has those beautiful swooping retro bike lines, AND quality adjustable suspension, brembo monoblocs off of an 1198 superbike, a powerful modern motor (78 horsepower by my math at peak torque), modern electronics, AND RADIAL TIRES!

    Please don’t be obscenely heavy or expensive you beautiful thing. I may have to buy you.

  • Matthew Kirn

    I had been looking seriously at a Norton but wanted to wait until the redesigned Thruxton came out. Glad I did. They are beautiful, especially the R model. I’m keeping my fingers crossed Triumph will keep the price reasonable, and what I mean by reasonable is around $10K. If they are priced right, I’ll be one of the first in line. Good job Triumph.

  • ADB

    After re-reading this article for the third time, I am still in awe of what the stylists and engineers at Triumph have been able to pull off. A monumental task to bring out five new models all at the same time. Superb. The R model will sell – with these looks and updates, it has to. Well done Triumph.

    Trade my 2013 Truxton???

  • Oren Danger Ovadia

    with all respect to triumph. that looks exactly 1 to 1 like the triumph contintel GT what the hell triumph? http://motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/Royal%20Enfield/royal_enfield_Continental%20GT.htm

    • John Sumser

      Your idea of “looks exactly” reminds me of when my wife says the Speed Triple looks “just like” the BMW R1200R.