We were definite fans of  the GSX-S750 when it was new to the U.S. two years ago, and now that Suzuki appears to have addressed our chief complaints, we’re prepared to be even bigger ones.

2015 Suzuki GSX-S750 Review

The classic GSX-R Four-banger in question actually harkens all the way back to 2005, because that one had a more upright cylinder block that lends itself to this short-wheelbased street scrapper. And we love our torque, but it’s nice to remember how fun rpm can be, too.

2015 Suzuki GSX-S750 Second Ride Review

For this 2018 model (which dealers should have by March, go figure), Suzuki squeezed out 8 more horsepower than before even while making it Euro 4 clean; now there are purported to be 112.6 (crankshaft) ones at 10,500 rpm. New ventilation holes in the cases reduce pumping losses, new 10-hole fuel injectors give a finer spritz, a new airbox and exhaust system breathe freer while, we’re told, making an even spine-tinglier howl. To keep you from hurting yourself, the new bike gets Suzuki’s 3-mode traction control. Like all the new Suzuki’s it also has the new Low RPM assist (that keeps you from stalling out) and Easy Start, which doesn’t overtax your starter-button thumb.

We complained about the cheap front brake; Suzuki shut us down with the addition of these nice 310mm petal discs and radial four-piston Nissin clampers.

We complained about the cheap front brake; Suzuki shut us down with the addition of these nice 310mm petal discs and radial four-piston Nissin clampers.

Other new things include stylish new bodywork and instrumentation that mimics the GSX-S1000, a new exhaust, a swell new swingarm, a new 41mm Kayaba fork, new 10-spoke wheels, a tapered aluminum handlebar that quells annoying vibrations… Oh yeah, the most annoying thing about the GSX-750S was that it wasn’t available in California. Now it is.

If the GSX-S1000 is $10,499, then the 750 might retail for around $8k or so. We’ll know more soon.

If the GSX-S1000 is $10,499, then the 750 might retail for around $8k or so. We’ll know more soon.

The GSX-S750Z adds a Model T paint job and ABS.

The GSX-S750Z adds a Model T paint job and ABS.

Follow the rest of our 2016 Intermot Show coverage for more information on new motorcycle announcements.

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Suzuki Communities

  • Dootin

    Blue and Black paint is cool.

    • Brian Clasby

      true

      • novemberjulius

        true

  • SRMark

    Nice step up for the folks who cut their teeth on a Gladius. And you get a head light that doesn’t look like a breast implant.

  • AM

    Can not believe they kept the same piggy weight. The 1000 is lighter.

    • c w

      and this is cheaper. by a lot.

  • Jon Jones

    Very, very nice looking.

  • HazardtoMyself

    If Suzuki really has fixed some of the bargain bin flaws then this bike goes back on the list. When I was looking at the GSX S1000 earlier in the year I considered the GSX S750 as well. While the GSX S1000 has it’s share of reported fueling issues, the 1000 might as well have been a Tuono compared to the cheap feeling of the 750.

    Ok, well maybe not quite a Tuono.

  • Y.A.

    “We were definite fans of the GSX-S750 when it was new to the U.S. two years ago,”

    Were you?

    http://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/suzuki/2015-suzuki-gsx-s750-second-ride-review.html

    “we can honestly report that Suzuki’s new naked performs almost flawlessly in the most underwhelming way possible.”

    That review didn’t seem too positive.

    I rode it and it was pretty boring. Compared to my ER-6n it was faster, but not as flickable, and it sounded like a sewing machine. The GSX-S1000 was much of the same, but it was so much faster the lack of character didn’t matter. That scary top end rush and torquey low/midrange was its character.

    • c w

      i came here to say the same thing.

      To be fair, Roderick came around to it

  • kenneth_moore

    It’s a “2018?” How does that work with the DMV and insurance companies, or doesn’t anybody give a crap about rational model-year designation?