Where were you on November 5th, 2013? I can’t remember, but if you’re an NC700X fan, like many of us here at MO, you may remember it as the day the European market got an upgraded bike – but those of us here in the USA didn’t. Well, better late than never, because American Honda announced the NC750X as a USA model, with all the improvements and new features of the Euro-bike.

2016 Honda NC700X Long-Term Review

For 2018, the NC gets a boost in displacement and other tasty engine upgrades. The bore is now 4mm wider, for a 75cc increase to 745cc. That should net a few more horses (I’d guess around 49 or 50 horsepower at the wheel), but power will now be even more accessible, thanks to the DCT’s new upshift ceiling at 7,500 rpm. There’s also the addition of two-level Honda Selectable Torque Control  (HSTC), Honda’s traction-control system. Also, Honda has added “Adaptive Clutch Capability Control” for smoother stops and starts with the DCT transmission.

We already saw improvements to the seat, windscreen and styling, so there are no changes on that front. Expect to see the new NC in dealers in the summer of 2018. There is no information on pricing as yet.

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  • StripleStrom

    lots of plastic. Interesting look. They should make it shaft drive. They would sell a bunch more.

    • Terence Kaplan

      shaft drive: no. too heavy for the bike, costs power.

      If you’re a paved road only rider you could try wishing for a belt drive, but a real adventure/multi-terrain bike really needs to be chain drive.

      • StripleStrom

        Do you really think this is a real adventure/multi-terrain bike? Really? It’s a dog anyway. What’s a few more horsepower for the convenience of not having to deal with a chain? It would make an excellent commuter bike (already is one, would be even better).

        • Sayyed Bashir

          Chains are not hard to deal with. I have them on two of my bikes. The third has belt drive.

          • StripleStrom

            I would disagree. Chains are a pain. Lubing them. Adjusting them. Changing them. I like the idea of something I can just get on and ride and not worry about. With this low revving of an engine, give it hydraulic valves too. That and a shaft would be major selling points to a lot of people.

          • DickRuble

            The already low power and torque would take a hit with hydraulic valves.

          • StripleStrom

            I doubt it. The reason it’s low power is that it’s in a soft state of tune to emphasize torque. That means the cam profiles are probably not very aggressive. This is the perfect motor for hydraulic valves.

          • DickRuble

            Think tractor: long stroke smallish bore. Can’t rev much. No amount of tuning, cam playing, will make a tractor a top speed contender.

          • StripleStrom

            Exactly, which is why it would be a good candidate for hydraulic valves..

          • Douglas

            Stroke is where an engine gets its power. You don’t need to go to 10k+ rpm when you have low & midrange oomph (unless you’re doing a track day). You don’t do “top speed” on public roads, do ya? Surely not….

          • WPZ

            Chains? No big deal. My 101K mile ZX1100E is on its second chain, which has 53,000+ miles on it. It needs an adjustment when the rear tire gets changed; I can’t even remember the last time I had to touch it mid-tire.
            The Gold Wing parked next to it needs slightly less final drive maintenance, I guess.
            As for the NC750X, it’s built and sold more as an economy bike than anything else in most of the world.
            The Missus has her NC700XD and simply loves it. It’s reliable, inexpensive, and a dream to ride.
            It may not be the bike for a heavy duty enthusiast in his prime (that DCT looks better as the old hands get ever more arthritic) but it’s a great bike for a lot of other riders.

          • John Claiborne II

            Hit the nail on the head. I ride my nc700x dct off road 99% going 45mph or less and avg 83 mpg. I am retired and interested in what I see vs draggin a knee.

          • Keith_Reeder

            “That and a shaft would be major selling points to a lot of people”

            No, you mean to *you*.

            This thing is already one of Honda’s best selling bikes in Europe – has been for years – so clearly your “essentials” aren’t seen as a big deal among the thousands that already ride the bike…

        • Terence Kaplan

          Honda’s website (at least in Canada) market it as an adventure.

          Just because the DCT and frunk make it a sexy commuter doesn’t mean it’s a one trick pony. I see it as a “own one bike that does OK at everything”

          And if you’re a serious commuter, you’ll install a chain oiler anyway. Still cost less than adding a shaft.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            And less weight for a chain compared to a shaft.

        • Keith_Reeder

          It’s a dog?

          Are you one of those tragic specimens that defines his manhood by the horsepower of the bike he rides?

  • DickRuble

    Too late. The decision makers at Honda who delayed US availability can take it and shove it, sidestand extended and exhaust flaming.

    • denchung

      Never understood Honda’s decision to do this. Even Canadians got the 750, but for the US, Honda waited until the 2018 model update to offer it.

      • DickRuble

        #BoycottHonda and maybe they’ll get the message.

        • Gabriel Owens

          Agree

        • John Claiborne II

          Go troll your mother, she must be used to it.

          • DickRuble

            You forgot your meds, old man? Alzheimer’s bothering you? Well then the NC700x is for you.

        • Keith_Reeder

          “Better”?

          Define “better”: It surely doesn’t *sell* better, here in the civilised world…

          • DickRuble

            There’s a nice review of the Versys, Strom, and NC700x from 2015. You should read it.

          • Keith Reeder

            So you’re just regurgitating random reviews that happen to play to your prejudices?

            That’s me put in my place, then.

            (I’d already guessed that there was zero *actual experience* to back up your claim…)

          • DickRuble

            Not random.. from a prestigious publication. And that’s more credible than the subjective and biased opinion of some tosser who can’t afford the petrol that goes with a proper motorcycle.

          • zzrwood

            And what, in your undoubtedly esteemed opinion, constitutes a proper motorcycle?

          • DickRuble

            Where’s your civilized world? New Syria, New Pakistan, or maybe New Lybia?

          • Keith Reeder

            You should be able to tell by the fact that I spell the word correctly that I’m from the UK – but that’s probably asking too much of a shitkicking redneck keyboard warrior…

      • I’m guessing something to do with CARB or EPA.

      • Mister X

        Yeah, the Canadians even got the Varadero.

        Honda was stupid not to sell it here in the U.S..

      • Rocky Stonepebble
        • DickRuble

          Intelligent posts, they go where they belong..

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            You’re an angry sort, aren’t you?

          • Sayyed Bashir

            No, this is normal for him.

  • Old MOron
    • DickRuble

      You don’t pay attention, do you? Have you read the past reviews of the NC? What kind of motor does it have? Does it rev much? Nooo…. it’s half of a Honda fit four cylinder.. . and feels like one.. It’s good to go grab a bag of onions but not for much else.. There’s actually a comparison of the old versions, the NC700x and the Versys.. Why waste time comparing them again when the outcome is pretty much clear cut? The NC is as exciting as a pint of barium early in the morning.

      • Old MOron

        It sure seems like you had your pint of barium this morning. Why compare them again? Because you learn more by testing than by declaring conclusions ahead of time. As for paying attention, that previous shootout is one of the things I considered. The NC700X was about nine percentage points behind the Kawi in the Motor category. But with the NC750X’s bigger engine and higher shift ceiling, maybe it’ll give the Kawi a run for its money this year. The Versys might still have the better motor, but will it be enough to win the over-all?

        • DickRuble

          It’s a forgone conclusion. Besides, Honda deserve #BoycottHonda as long as they market discriminate. Same for KTM.

          • Old MOron

            I guess when motorcycle fans want forgone conclusions delivered in brusque dismissive tones, they can turn to you. When they want detailed analysis delivered with MOronic flare, they’ll turn to MO.

          • DickRuble

            You’re definitely amateur of flares.. not so much flair.

          • Old MOron

            LOL suits me right for replying in haste.
            Oh well, it’s a foregone conclusion that you’re the biggest pedant in this MOronic realm.

          • Get a room, you two!

          • Rocky Stonepebble
          • Old MOron

            Ha, I come here for my own edification, not the other way around.

          • Rocky Stonepebble

            Quiet … I’m on a roll.

          • John Claiborne II

            We all want to know how low your iq is now.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Lets keep KTM out of this.

          • spiff

            Why you hatin Orange? Sip the Kool-Aid. Drink the Kool-aid. Chug the Kool-aid.

          • DickRuble

            ’cause they kept the 690 Duke R out of USA.

          • spiff

            Yeah, that wasn’t cool.

      • zzrwood

        It’s not half a Honda Fit/Jazz engine at all… One of the engineers once said they drew inspirations from the Honda Jazz, so that obviously became become an “internet fact”… When I had a test ride in Oz (on the NC750X) the torque of this motor was really addictive.

        • DickRuble

          Quote:
          the technology and even some of the components come from Honda’s Jazz four-cylinder. The bore and slightly longer stroke (73 x 80mm) are the same as the car’s and so is all of the fundamental engine technology. The clue stares you in the face as you sit astride the bike: the rev counter’s red line is drawn at a lowly – for a bike – 6,500rpm. Engine designer Takanori Osuka says they had meetings with engineers from Honda’s car division once or twice a month for two years during the design process, the first time this has happened at Honda.

          Anything you want to add?

          • Gabriel Owens

            Calm your tits.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Did you mean to say “cool your jets”? The auto-correct system must have changed it.

          • Sentinel

            lol

          • Mister X

            Correlation is not causation, for all your bluster, you make One weak point, a similarity to the bore and stroke to the car engine, nothing more.
            Your assertion of “and so is all of the fundamental engine technology”, had me laughing my ass off!
            Care to provide Any details, I mean, thats a pretty broad piece of info to back up your increasingly strident assertions.
            Are trying to say if it doesn’t Rev, it’s Not a motorcycle engine, because it appears you are, and if so, I’m laughing at you again.

          • DickRuble

            It’s a quote from a bike review in a magazine. If you weren’t a turd you would’ve noticed.

          • DickRuble

            It’s a quote from a bike review. If you hadn’t gotten a turd for brain you would’ve noticed.

            http://www.ashonbikes.com/content/honda-nc700x-0

          • Mister X

            Oh my, you act as a child would, we’re done.

          • Born to Ride

            Don’t go so soon, he’s not all that bad. Well… He’s not the worst.

          • Mister X

            Heh, I haven’t gone anywhere, I had a son and 3 step-sons, unfortunately, some kids never grow up, and I don’t converse with children posing as adults, no biggie.

          • Douglas

            Pretty close, tho’…..his views on things are always the correct ones.

          • John Claiborne II

            you read it on the internet… says it all

          • Rocky Stonepebble
          • zzrwood

            Sigh…

            Seeing as how you quote Kevin Ash’s website to support your claim, here are some facts for you…

            I built Kevin’s website for him and knew him well – he was a great journalist and his tragic death was a terrible loss. He would, however, be the first to admit when he got something wrong – which is the case here.

            The “half a Jazz engine” rumour originated when the NC project leader Soya Uchida made this remark: “I got a hacksaw and cut a Jazz engine in half, but it didn’t really run very well so we had to put some more work into the NC700X”. It was a throw away remark made in jest but it has been endlessly repeated because it was made in a room full of journalists and it made it into print and onto the web. That in itself does not make it any more true than it was at the time it was said.

            The NC engine and the Jazz engines share virtually nothing in detail. The 270 degree crankshaft arrangement is different, the valve train is different, some are 8 valve heads, some are 16 valve, the fuel delivery system is different, the electrical generating system is different, the water pump is driven differently, etc, etc.

            The only detail that is the same is the bore diameter (and not the stroke) of the 1339 cc auto engine.

            So, it isn’t “half a Fit/Jazz engine” at all.

            Anything YOU want to add?

          • Sayyed Bashir

            What about the redline?

          • DickRuble

            The undersquare cylinders, the cylinders’ volume, the parallell architecture, the low rev limit confer the principal characteristics of this engine. They confer its “character” — that of a limp comuter vehicle. Nobody thinks they cut an engine in half, if that’s yuour concern. The engine architecture/design is more akin to that of a small car, and happens to be about half the size of a Fit/Jazz. That they changed some internals and chose to let it vibrate a little matters not. The fact is all reviewers have pointed out that its engine is more akin a car engine than a motorcycle engine. End of conversation.

          • DickRuble

            You wouldn’t understand, but the fact that the red line is about the same as for a Harley is a major concern to motorcyclists 🙂

          • Sayyed Bashir

            I have never cared much about redlines, just riding my bikes. And since Harleys are the largest selling 600cc+ bikes in America, it seems all motorcyclists do not share your viewpoint.

          • Keith_Reeder

            “You wouldn’t understand, but the fact that the red line is about the same as for a Harley is a major concern to motorcyclists :)”

            Christ, you’re a ballsack.

            Thousands of motorcyclists here in Europe love this thing, you arrogant twat.

          • DickRuble

            You created this account six hours ago to profess your love for a lousy scooter? Here in the uncivilized world the 2014 unsold NC700x sell fro $4,487, and nobody wants them. A small part of the reason for this situation is Honda’s arrogant decision to keep the 750 out of the American market, while customers saw it available elsewhere.

          • zzrwood

            So what is pissing you off most? That Honda was arrogant to not offer Americans the NC750X, or that it is a “limp commuter vehicle”.
            Or are you just another douchebag reinforcing American stereotypes? Like it has to be bigger and more powerful to be relevant to “real” motorcyclists – as defined by you…

          • DickRuble

            The undersquare cylinders, the cylinders’ volume, the parallell architecture, the low rev limit confer the principal characteristics of this engine. They confer its “character” — that of a limp comuter vehicle. Nobody thinks they cut an engine in half, if that’s yuour concern. The engine architecture/design is copied/inspired from a small car, which happens to be the Fit/Jazz. That they changed some internals and chose to let it vibrate a little matters not. They use some of the car parts. The fact is all reviewers have pointed out that its engine is more akin a car engine than a motorcycle engine. End of conversation.

          • zzrwood

            A limp commuter vehicle that handles brilliantly due to its low centre of gravity and is faster from 0-110km/h than a CB600F. Probably why it’s a big seller in Europe where they have roads with corners. You know, the fun ones.
            Seriously, you have NFI…

          • John Claiborne II

            some people love to continue no matter how stupid they sound.

          • Keith_Reeder

            ” They confer its “character” — that of a limp commuter vehicle.”

            Which is entirely different to your original ignorant assertion, isn’t it?

            Oh – and it still has a power-to-weight ratio in the same ballpark as a Beemer M3…

          • zzrwood

            The design goals for the NC project included economy and utility – the motorcycle engineers collaborated with the car engineers (supposedly for the first time) to see what could be gleaned from very economic and utilitarian vehicles like the Jazz. So they designed an engine with a low rpm limit, but strong low-down torque and exceptional fuel economy, something that is surprisingly missing from most motorcycles.

            Many motorcyclists, particularly those used to high-revving four cylinder bikes, found it hard to adapt to this – although the NC series has been a big hit in Europe, where riders tend to use bikes more for daily transport and are therefore often more interested in utility, rather than bragging rights.

            It seems that in the US, where riders often view motorcycles as playthings, the concept of an economical and utilitarian motorcycle – that doesn’t provide a high-rev rush – is sometimes seen as a bit odd.

          • John Claiborne II

            lmao you have to be moron of the year with that Fit garbage. Its the same rotary engine that is in your cell phone.

          • Keith_Reeder

            “Anything you want to add?”

            How about:

            “the technology and even some of the components come from Honda’s Jazz four-cylinder”

            is *not* the same as:

            “it’s half of a Honda fit four cylinder”

            ?

      • John Claiborne II

        ITS NOT A HALF OF ANYTHING. STOP SPEWING GARBAGE! I KNOW, I KNOW YOU READ IT ON THE INTERNET RIGHT. ITS REALLY HALF A MAZDA ROTARY ENGINE THATS IN YOUR CELL PHONE!

        • DickRuble

          In the engine bay, the NC is mechanically interesting since it uses what many motorcycle industry pundits are describing as “half a Honda Fit engine.” The mill has a redline of just 6000 rpm and the PGM-FI system has executive control over power delivery, via throttle-by-wire. Intended or otherwise, it definitely has a nanny built in to prevent rapid acceleration—but do we really need this feature in a 474-pound machine that puts less than 50 horsepower on the ground?

          ———————————————————————————————–

          Riding the BMW scooter for me is much more agreeable than riding the Honda. It could be that the Honda feels like an ill-planned experiment, while the BMW feels like its designers knew exactly what they wanted to achieve, which is ironic: this is BMWs first scooter, and Honda’s bazillionth motorcycle.

          Author: Gabe Ets-Hokin — Motorcycle-USA.com

          http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/2013/05/article/bmw-c650gt-vs-honda-nc700x/

    • Rocky Stonepebble
  • Gabriel Owens

    Yet another Honda that will not sell well in the U.S.

  • Campisi

    I’d hoped Honda would incorporate the shaft-drive mechanism of the Riding Assist-e prototype. That was built off of the same platform, and eliminating chain maintenance would assist in the NC range’s raison d’etre.

  • Keith_Reeder

    “I’d guess around 49 or 50 horsepower at the wheel”

    Why guess? it’s 54.