Suck it up all you Harley haters, and behold the new Street Rod – pretty much what we wished the original Street 750 could’ve been in 2014.

At the heart of the matter is a snarlier 60-degree SOHC V-Twin: The High Output Revolution X 750 is said to produce 18% more horsepower and 8% more torque than the standard Revolution X 750 engine, via larger airbox feeding a new dual-throat throttle body, revised four-valve cylinder heads, new high-lift camshafts and a higher-volume muffler. Compression ratio is up from 11.0:1 to 12.0:1 – and the hotter enchilada is now revvable to 9,000 rpm instead of 8,000. Extrapolating from our last 54-hp Dynojet-measured Street 750, the Street Rod should be good for about 64 horses at the rear tire and about 47 lb-ft of torque.

Model Year 2017.5 Campaign

All that would be for naught if not for significant (and very non-Harleyesque) chassis developments: Longer, piggyback reservoir shocks out back provide a full 4.6 inches of rear-wheel travel and a much more purposeful stance, while also helping reduce the rake angle all the way from 32 to 27 steepish degrees. The fork itself is an inverted unit with 43mm sliders, anodized black along with its alloy triple clamps. Them brakes is 300mm dual discs which appear to be clamped by the same just okay two-piston slide-type calipers the standard Street uses. But at least there are two of them on the Street Rod, and ABS and H-D’s Security System are standard features.

Suddenly we’re looking at a bike H-D claims can be heeled 37.3 degrees to the right and 40.2 degrees to the left instead of 28.5 degrees either direction, a big-boy motorcycle that’ll make good use of the 17-inch Michelin Scorcher radials it flaunts front and rear. Curb weight is said to be 516 pounds. The whole thing actually looks pretty swell, too, following in H-D’s Dark Custom motif (and just like the Street that was in the last Captain America movie, notes the ever-observant Dennis Chung).

Model Year 2017.5 Campaign

Taller riders will be happy that the seat’s now 3.7 inches higher, at 29.4 inches in its laden state (30.1 inches unladen), which will provide more legroom to new forged aluminum footpegs that look like they’re in the same perfectly acceptable mid-mount spot as before. It all looks quite nice and standard-bike comfortable, really. And don’t forget the color-matched speed screen, the streetfighter-inspired tail, the new LED taillight and turn signals and bar-end mirrors.

“The Street Rod will put the thrill in any urban commute,” said Mathew Weber, Harley-Davidson Chief Engineer for the Street Rod. “Tires, wheels, suspension and frame geometry are engineered to work together and deliver handling that’s light and precise at all speeds.”

Model Year 2017.5 Campaign

The Street Rod starts at $8,699 in Vivid Black; Charcoal Denim and Olive Gold retail for $8,994. That puts it near the $8,700 Triumph Street Twin that trounced it in last year’s comparison, so the sweet little Triumph could be in for a much tougher tussle this year. Let the Harley-Davidson/Triumph/Indian wars begin, on track and off!

The great and all-knowing JB is off to ride the Street Rod next week in Daytona. Stay tuned for his bipartisan findings.

Harley-Davidson’s Street 750 is a Highly Customizable

 

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  • Kenneth

    “…and ABS and H-D’s Security System are standard features.”

    ‘Just visited the H-D website, which shows a base price of $8699, with ABS an additional $750, and “Security” at $395.

    • Wet weight looks like 516 pounds! Yikes.

      • kawatwo

        Yup that is the deal breaker. Maybe if it had hydraulic valve adjusters I would think about it otherwise why would you buy one of these over a Z650 or FZ07 or SV650?

        • HazardtoMyself

          Because it says Harley Davidson on the tank.

          If it doesn’t say Harley, it’s not a real bike right?

        • Gabriel Owens

          But if those are the bikes you were shopping this bike shouldn’t really appeal to you in Harleys eyes. I think they going after the xsr900, guzzi, and bonnie crowd.

        • Lee Taplinger

          Can you use hydraulic valve adjusters with OHC? Even it had them I can’t imagine comparing the Harley to the 3 bikes you mention – they are totally modern engineered for light weight, high-revving power, computerized TC, modern suspension, form-follows-function, looks-be-damned, styled like an insect on steroids complete with a wasp tail rear fender.

          • Eric

            Yes. Honda used it for years on their fantastic 750 Nighthawk engine. Too bad the bike itself was so boring, as that is a great daily-rider engine.

          • Lee Taplinger

            I wish there were more great daily-riders. Turn the key and go. No expensive periodic services with shim valve adjustment, no chain adjustments and oiling with chain and sprocket replacements.

  • KPC

    Well, FINALLY HD, a standard motorcycle made in the USA, not produced by the worlds worst business person, EB. This looks great and by the numbers anyway seems well designed. My only quibbles: Lean angles are a little weak, the old Yamaha Warrior could lean 40 degrees each way stock, but I’m sure the aftermarket will have a solution for this ( 45 each way is fine for 90% of us, even when we try and be “fast”). It’s afflicted by the HD tiny tank syndrome. I don’t mind the peanut shape ( I don’t love it) but would it kill HD to put a 4+ gallon tank on this this (3.5 isn’t too bad, but still). Why does this thing have to weight 120 pounds More than an FZ 07? or 100 pounds more than a sv650? That just shows a lack of engineering know how.

    Price: this thing is listed for 7645 pounds in the UK incl VAT. HD is gouging us buyers in the USA big time. If this turns out to be the street price, they will be gathering dust in showrooms.

    Still, Its the first HD I could see myself owning. If it were 60 pound lighter (450 still isn’t a featherweight), I’d by one tomorrow.

    • DickRuble

      Made in the USA? Hardly.. maybe assembled in the USA.
      Engineered in the USA? Certainly .. and as you point out “That just shows a lack of engineering know how.”
      Gouging buyers in the US? How? 7,645 pounds is $9,326. In the USA the bike has an MSRP of 8,699…

      • KPC

        Mr. Ruble, you are right , “Assembled” in the USA, (I knew that). The price in the UK includes 20% VAT, which we don’t have, (here in Oregon we don’t even have a sales tax). So yes I think, HD is gouging by $1,000 – $1,200, which how much of a discount we’ll see in the fall if these don’t sell over the summer.

        • Gabriel Owens

          Plus Harley gets ya to open the wallet with the catalog HD parts to go faster.

          • KPC

            Got that right!

      • Goose

        OK Dick, Why are you (and many others) unable to accept that the North American Streets (engine included) are made in the USA? I believe this fine web site has shown pictures of the street engines being built in Harley’s assembly line in Kansas City.

        Here is a quote on the subject “All Street 750s and Street 500s for US and Canadian consumption will be built in the Harley-Davidson Vehicle and Powertrain Operations plant in Kansas City, Missouri, where there is a manufacturing line dedicated to producing the liquid-cooled Revolution X engine”.

        Are 100% of the parts US made? Of course not. Harley, like every other manufacturer, sources parts where they see fit. That is why my made-in-Japan Honda car has parts that say “Made In China”, my made in Italy Ducatis and made in Germany BMWs had Japanese made parts. If you say a vehicle has to be 100% made in ____ parts to be made in ______ there are no made in one country two or four wheeled vehicles.

        • DickRuble

          ok.. Goose.. Maybe you’re right.. I can’t prove or disprove it.. I can only say that I walked around one in a showroom and it looked very much like it had been made in India.. but there’s no reason they can’t build crappy stuff in Kansas City.

      • Auphliam

        Gotta call ya on that one, DR. The ‘Streets” may have been an Indian project, but from what I understand, all US sold Streets are built exclusively here.

    • Larry Kahn

      Where did you see the tank size?

      • KPC

        All the specs are posted on the HD website.

    • Auphliam

      Do you weigh every bike you buy, or do you just read spec sheets and talk sh*t about all the bikes you won’t? By the way, 7645 pounds UK = +$9k US. Exactly what they’re selling the things for. They aren’t gouging anyone. Quit trying so hard to sound smart and go for a ride, for f*cks sake. It’s a good effort on their part. Accept it and move on. There’s no extra credit to be had anymore for the obligatory poseur HD bashing.

      • DickRuble

        A good effort … It’s usually what you tell the guy who was on the receiving end in a boxing match. Please tell me how this is better than a 32 yo Honda Sabre v45.

        • Auphliam

          LOL yeah, you’re right. I guess I was feeling like being a doosh last night.

          • KPC

            No troubles! Ive been there. Plus full disclosure, Id really like to ride, and maybe own one of these.

  • Robotribe

    I’m a little taken aback here. This actually looks like a motorcycle that isn’t targeting aging boomers or pirate-envy GenX-ers (that’s me, except for the pirate-envy thing) and it says “HARLEY DAVIDSON” on the tank; dare I say,”relevant” to more than just the orange & black lifestyle fans. Sure, it’s a little on the porky side and the better lean angles are better but not great (but probably enough for what most would use this bike for), but the improvements outweigh those things.

    Compliments to HD for “stepping” out of their box.

    • DickRuble

      As long as you remember this is only for those right leaning riders (different lean angles)….

      • Gabriel Owens

        That one was funny.

  • Jon Jones

    The rider in the leading pic forgot the bike has mirrors.

    • DickRuble

      Harely riders don’t know mirrors..

  • Brian Clasby

    Imagine the world-class hooligan machine it would be with the V-Rod motor . . . IMAGINE!

    • DickRuble

      Imagine the 600lbs weight.. IMAGINE… Imagine the undersized swing arm and frame twisting and bending out of alignment, and welds (Indian welds) cracking.. IMAGINE..

      • Kevin Butler

        What Indian welds ? This bike is being built in Kansas City exclusively and to be shipped to global markets.

      • Brian Clasby

        I guess what I had in mind was the light bike with the big engine – though 500+ pounds is no lightweight it’s still lighter than the ‘rod.

        • DickRuble

          That big engine is heavy and long.. That’s the reason Buell couldn’t/wouldn’t use it back the.

          • mikstr

            sadly, it didn’t have to be, but Harley worked their magic on it; such a failed opportunity…

      • Eric

        Not that the Street line in the USA uses them, but are Indian welds demonstrably worse than the Thai welds Triumph and Ducati use on their Street and Scrambler, respectively?

        • DickRuble

          I am not even sure they are worse than American welds…

    • azicat

      Mid mounted footpegs have been available in the HD V-Rod accessories catalog for a while.

      http://mstore.harley-davidson.com/store/v-rod-mid-control-kit

  • Mark D

    I can see the pigs flying through the sky! The devil is having a snowball fight with the recently-discovered Loc Ness Monster!

    A Harley I want to buy! I didn’t think I’d live to see that day!

  • Ron Hayes

    This is not Harley Davidson’s first attempt at building a standard motorcycle. Lets not forget the VRSCR Street Rod (2006-2007) and the XR1200 (2008-2012). I guess the new one will benefit from the lower sticker price but that also includes a smaller liquid cooled engine.

  • Starmag

    A step in the right direction. I hope it sells and further encourages Harley. Your girlfriends and/or wife won’t be thrilled with that seat though.

    • Gary.1

      If the wife doesn’t like the seat, tell her where the nearest Harley dealer is and she can go get her own.

  • Old MOron

    I love you MOrons, but you seem to have difficulty with conjugation and plurality.
    I first noticed Trizzle speaking of himself in 3rd person: http://disq.us/p/1gac4dg
    Bruce did it in his 2017 Moto GP preview, and now JohnnyB.

    LOL, hey JB, you took your plural personality much further by considering you findings as “bipartisan” eh? Or perhaps you meant that you would consider the Street Rod in the context of the “Harley-Davidson/Triumph/Indian wars”. In that case, wouldn’t your view by tripartisan?

    Anyway, as others have noted, this seems like a much improved bike. Still a little heavy. Lean angles? What do you suppose the Street Twin is doing here? I guess I’ll wait for the shootout before I stop “hating”.
    http://motorcycle.com.vsassets.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/120915-2016-triumph-street-twin-ap1_3220-422×633.jpg

    • Gabriel Owens

      I believe the extra power of the Harley….plus HD catalog hop up partS would make the Harley the winner.

      HD is gonna make Murica great again.

      • Old MOron

        Good onya, Gabe. Keep the faith. I’ll wait for the shootout. But I don’t look favorably on spending a fortune on HD catalog hop up parts.

        • Gabriel Owens

          But many will. HD has a fanatical fan base.

          • mikstr

            and their fanatical base will outright reject this bike, as they have everything that is not an air-cooled, chromed-up, underpowered and overweight land yacht…

          • Gabriel Owens

            I’m just trying to be positive negative nancy

          • mikstr

            big difference between positive and delusional, gullible gabe

          • Gabriel Owens

            You can Trump all you want. Insults only make YOU look bad. Currently own a 2014 honda cb1000r and a 2015 yamaha fjr1300. Got bike sense. But in the garage I park mostly Ford. I would be willing to try an American bike if someone would try to appeal to my tastes. Sorry if my enthusiasm is a problem for you. The world really needs more cynics…so kudos!

          • mikstr

            wow, touchy aren’t we! not sure what it is exactly your are on about but hey, have at it. Nice collection of bikes FWIW….

      • Gruf Rude

        I don’t see hop-up parts (other than noisy exhaust) in this bike’s future. Hopping up the old Harley tractor motors comes naturally; these more modern engines resist the shade-tree mechanic approach.

  • KPC

    This thing will be crossed shopped with the FZ07, z650, SV650. All of which are >100 pounds lighter and >$1,000 cheaper. Kudo’s to HD for stepping onto a new playing field, But I think its going to be tough sledding for this bike. Again, take 60-70 pounds off and I think it works. People will pay more (not a crazy amount more) for a bike assembled in the USA, designed in the USA

    • Jason

      The Triumph Bonneville Street Twin is the target.

      • KPC

        So, then its only a little over 30 pounds overweight. I disagree, the TR is a retro, this is clearly being pitched as a modern middle weight (displacement-wise, again this thing is a pig).
        remember the XL1200? they took off 20 odd pounds using an aluminum swing-arm taking weight off the swing-arm and sub-frame/ seat assembly (ah la z650) could have saved the weight it needed to be competitive.

        Lazy engineering.

        • KPC

          Harley brass just gave an interview and they stated their bench mark was the MT07 (FZ07 in the states). I’d say the got it right except for the extra 115 pounds! Oh, and the price is $1,200 too high.

          • mikstr

            they probably look at the extra 115 lbs as giving you more for your money, lol

          • KPC

            LMAO! Is THAT how HD sets pricing, $ per pound!

          • mikstr

            or is it in inverse proportion to power? tough call…. lol

            P.S. chrome is quite heavy….

        • Jason
          • DickRuble

            I like the Ascot better.. And the 1985 Honda Sabre 750 would kick this HD’s ass in all categories.

            https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/bd/89/8f/bd898f02107c52f7eef0dc1bebde5606.jpg

          • Eric

            That bike, as cool as it was back in the day, would be priced $2k over the price of the Harley now. I had the ’84 Interceptor myself, and man was that a great engine, except when it came time for service. You needed an extra joint in your hand in order to work on it!

          • mikstr

            I came very close to buying one of these (Ascot twin) as my first street bike before a sweet deal came long on a Seca 650; always had a sweet spot for the little twin, however….

    • TheMarvelous1310

      It competes with the retro middleweights, the 900cc Bonnevilles and Moto Guzzi V7s. In true American fashion, it’s heavier but more powerful.

  • Dootin

    Nice looking motorcycle Harley.

  • JWH

    I’m going to be bold and predict an out and out failure. Not fast enough for sport riders and it sure has hell has zero appeal to traditionalists. I’m going on record as hating it on first sight.

    • TheMarvelous1310

      Nope. It’s well equipped to compete with every Bonnie up to the Street Cup, and the Moto Guzzi V7. RETRO COMPARO!

      • Born to Ride

        Good thing you omitted Ducati. The Scrambler will trounce it in every performance category.

        • TheMarvelous1310

          Yeah, but it’s a Scrambler and this is a STREET ROD YAYUH! It’s a streety street bike for the street streeters in the streets! They distance themselves from each other by name alone, I can’t expect buyers to make that connection if I didn’t.

          • Born to Ride

            You’re deluding yourself if you think this bike wasn’t made to appeal to the same flannel wearing, bearded buyer that the scrambler was. Both are pared down, modern but retrospective nostalgia machines. Just saying that with 100 less lbs and more power, the Ducati does it better. YMMV

          • JohnnyS

            Agreed. You’d think that HD would have realized that if they are going to compete on something besides noise and image then they need to sell a bike that can at least keep up to the competition.

          • TheMarvelous1310

            Nope. This is for the vintage T-shirt and tennis shoes hipster, not the flannel and Doc Marten hipster. The guy who’s favorite band is Imagine Dragons wants this Street Rod, the guy who’s favorite band is Mumford and Sons wants the Ducati.

          • Born to Ride

            Dammit you may be right. Hipster classifications are constantly changing.

          • Eric

            Ever had to get a Duc serviced? You may rethink your purchase once you see what that costs. And that’s assuming you’re lucky enough to find a dealer that actually knows how to service one correctly. Bad things happen when the cam belts break. Ask me how I know…

          • Born to Ride

            I’ve owned 4 air cooled Ducatis. 2 of which I have put over 30k miles on, and I have never had a timing belt even fray let alone snap on me. You’d have to leave one in there for well over 5 years or 20k miles to see appreciable wear, ask me how I know… In any case, 400-500$ per valve service kinda sucks if you ride a lot and have no skills with tools. Anyways, timing belts are 100$ a pair(which is outlandish) but take 30 minutes to replace and adjust once you have the timing covers off.

          • Eric

            It’s good to hear not everyone has had my experience. Mine blew up the rear cylinder when the timing belt let go, two weeks after being brought in specifically to have the timing belts replaced. After several thousand in repairs, because I was told it wasn’t the shop’s fault, and my bike was 3 months out of warranty, Ducati wouldn’t help, either. The problems get worse, as I discover the bike fouling its rear plug with oil shortly following the “repair.” After taking it to another dealer, they replace the head, piston, cylinder, etc. again. More huge repair bills. It ran better, but still wasn’t right. I sold the bike after this nightmare. It had 37k on it at the time, and I was meticulous about making sure it had all services at the proper intervals. No more belt driven cams for me!

          • Born to Ride

            Wow, that is a horrendous story. It sounds to me like they might have adjusted your vertical cylinder belt waaay to tight or something. The Gates timing belts used on these bikes are the same as what goes in a honda or a toyota car for 100k miles. The reason they only last a fraction of that is because of the tensioner arrangement that allows for a ton of belt deflection and oscillation that undermines the longevity of the belt. In reality, they are safe for about 20k miles when properly adjusted, as evidenced by the 15k and 18k service intervals on the newer bikes compared to 12k. Ducati didn’t change the belt drive, just the interval. The issue is that your experience was one of incompetence on behalf of a poorly trained technician, and therefore isn’t an inherent flaw with the bike.

  • ADB

    Excellent news. Finally.

  • SteveSweetz

    Looks decent, but 516lb wet according to HD’s specs.

    Moto Guzzi V7, Triumph Street Twin both right around 460lb wet and a little cheaper.

    • Gabriel Owens

      I’m not a Harley guy, but I bet the motor on this Harley will destroy either of those bikes by a bit….but the weight issue is for real. Just like you’ve stated.

      • SteveSweetz

        MG V7 III is claimed 52hp, Triumph is around 55hp. Harley should indeed more powerful based on the projection…but it’s offset by that weight. Still, by my calc it still should have a weight/power advantage over those two (just barely in the case of the Triumph).

        Although that said, if you value performance first, you’d certainly get a Z650 or FZ-07 instead. Weight is an issue for day-to-day convenience and livability, not just performance of course.

        • Lee Taplinger

          Exactly. The weight of my Sportster is irrelevant going down the road. But moving it around parking lots and the garage and negotiating long gravel driveways gets harder every year.

          • DickRuble

            Keeping on with positive thinking; the weight is actually beneficial when moving downhill…

  • CACooper

    H-D misses the mark yet again by looking back instead of ahead. But they’re getting closer. I’m still waiting for the XG750R Street Scrambler, modeled after their flat track racer. Scramblers are all the rage right now, and what does H-D do? Rehash a decade old styling exercise that never sold in big numbers and apply it to an equally unpopular bike. Their stupidity is astounding.

    They’ve got the base machine already, all that’s left to do is add a more angular tank and tail section, high SS pipes and sportier paint. They’re almost there. So close but no cigar. So frustrating waiting for H-D to make a decision. And the motorcycle world marches on. My wallet is still closed and I’m not getting any younger.

    • TheMarvelous1310

      Oh, quit whining. So you wouldn’t buy this, a pair of knobbly tires and a higher exhaust? That’s all it really needs to be a scrambler, and you can eBay that for under a grand. Maybe 1500 if you get a custom exhaust, front fender and a skidplate. If that’s not good enough, the Husqvarna 701 Enduro is what Steve McQueen would have ridden.

  • AM

    “Suck it up all you Harley haters, and behold the new Street Rod – pretty much what we wished the original Street 750 could’ve been in 2014.”
    Mr.Burns you are probably a H-D fan and probably have one. And the vibrations from riding that thing, because it’s definitely not a motorcycle, along the years got your brain damaged.

  • JMDGT

    The first thing that I thought was why would anyone buy this instead of the Street Triple.

    • Born to Ride

      Street triple isn’t really the bike it’s competing with. That’s a flat out sport bike. However it is competing with the street twin and the Ducati scrambler. And I wouldn’t take this personally.

      • JMDGT

        I get that. For a few dollars more I see the Triple as a bike that I would want a lot more than this monstrosity. I just hate these things. Nothing taken personally.

        • Born to Ride

          Sorry, meant to say “personally, of those three I wouldn’t take this”

  • mikstr

    Getting incrementally closer to building an actual, desirable motorcycle…

    • Born to Ride

      XR1200x was very desireable. But people want you to pay through the nose for a clean used one.

      • Gabriel Owens

        Is the nostalgia of it worth it? That’s what you have to ask. When I first got into motorcycles it was a bike that I really wanted to try. Or at least get to ride. But at that time I was low of cash. I had a sv650 that I eventually traded for a new klr650. To me back then 7k+ was insane to try to manage for a bike. Luckily as you grow up, you make more money.

      • Lee Taplinger

        Who knew? At the time Harley dealers couldn’t give them away. I rode one in WV and it was pretty terrible, I thought. A bike styled like a light, high-revving bike that was very heavy and low-revving. Thunky shifters are fine on cruisers but not on this bike. And the orange color scheme to me was just plain ugly.

        • Born to Ride

          I didn’t get to ride one, but MO thought it compared favorably to the M1100 which I do own. I like it in black with the upgraded suspension of the X model. I’d find me a 17″ front wheel and get a hotter cam for it. You might be right though, I tend to be underwhelmed by a lot of bikes.

    • Gabriel Owens

      That xr1200 a few years back seemed legit, made my worm wiggle a bit.

      • Born to Ride

        Beat you by 60 seconds

      • mikstr

        Loved the look, too bad it was overweight (about 100 lbs) and somewhat underpowered (by about 20 or so hp)…

        • Gabriel Owens

          True enough, but as Harley goes, she was a beauty

          • mikstr

            absolutely, first time a Hog had me “yearning”…

    • davey Boy

      they’ll have one eventually, unfortunately by that time the hover bike will be dominating the market..

  • Gabriel Owens

    I don’t fit on the street 750 at all. Will this feel the same?

  • Junker

    I kind of like it….except…am I the only one that thinks the radiator on this (and the scout / octane) are crazy big for the bike?

    • Auphliam

      I agree. With the Scout/Octane, the radiator housing is built into the aluminum cast frame…which makes them look much bigger than they actually are. Kind of the same with these HDs. The housing just adds size to it. The actual radiator probably isn’t much bigger than those on the new Trumpets. Both companies (HD and Polaris) would probably be further ahead to put a little effort into hiding them instead of emphasizing them with these shrouds.

  • Larry Kahn

    Your move, Indian. Don’t blow it!

    • Gary Latessa

      A Scout 60 has this bike covered already. And it’s too close in price to make a difference.

      • Jason

        Not if the route includes corners. We need a Scout that can turn and stop.

        • Gary Latessa

          Hold your breath. I predict it coming sooner than later. Maybe a flat track replica?

          • Jason

            That would be nice. I’m not holding my breath though. The Victory Octane was suppose to be a standard but instead Polaris gave us an Indian Cruiser painted black.

  • Auphliam

    V-twin juicer with Nice ergos, mid controls, dual disks and upside down forks…looks like could be a lot of fun. Can’t wait for the ride review.

  • CFLAP

    Now, if Harley Davidson can convince President Trump to slap huge tariffs on Japanese and British bikes, they’ll sell a ton of them…………(sarc).

  • SRMark

    How about one in color. Maybe emerald green with a gold accent. It’ll sell like the XR1200.

  • TheMarvelous1310

    Holy fork’n shocks! (explodes in slow motion, then reverses back together)

    YES! HARLEY-DAVIDSON LISTENS TO FEEDBACK! FINALLY Harley-Davidson catches the trend, makes good use of the Street 750 platform and the Street Rod name-never forget the VRSCR!-and gives the Street Cup, the V7 III and the FZ-07(Calling out competitors, I like it! Swing for the fence, Wisconsin!) the MORE POWERFUL American competition the world deserves… On paper, at least. I’ll believe it when I read the reviews and comparisons.

    I think it’s hilarious how the shocks are red and chrome on a grey and black bike, as if to say ‘LOOK! It’s a REAL suspension! Do you SEE it?! LOOK HOW MUCH SUSPENSION WE HAVE! THIS IS FOR YOUUUU!!!’ Oh, I’m looking, Harley-Davidson, and I like every inch of what I see.

  • Joe

    The Harley power numbers are right around what my 2009 air cooled Bonneville has but weighs about 40lbs more. I think it would be a fun street bike and it’s a step in the right direction for HD. A street tracker style would have been better IMO. Street tracker styling would have set it apart from the other bikes in it’s segment while tying it to HD’s bread and butter of racing success with flat track racing.
    Bonnie Specs:
    http://www.bikez.com/motorcycles/triumph_bonneville_se_2009.php

    • Kenneth

      The advertised “Dry Weight” is virtually meaningless – especially between two different manufacturers. I own the same Bonnie (2011), with a wet weight of just-under 500 pounds (likely more, with its center stand). This Street Rod – with liquid cooling – is listed as 516 pounds, wet. You’d have to be hypersensitive to complain about that little difference between two ~500 pound bikes, but most racer-wannabes (not saying that’s you, Joe) here will evidently continue to whine about this non-issue. Regardless of what “Harley brass” supposedly says, I just don’tt see this bike as something likely to be cross-shopped by those interested in the diminutive FZ-07.

      • KPC

        Harley brass, in the roll out interview Stated that the standard they used was the FZ07, NOT those retros. We need to stop lowering the bar for HD because they’re ‘murican.

  • mugwump

    This is not an “extreme ” enough departure. The faithful will turn away and it can’t compete in its market. I want to believe they can do better. The brand isn’t sufficient to make me consider a purchase.

  • allworld

    Gee, imagine no need for loud pipes.
    Hopefully this is a new beginning of and not just a one and done offering.

  • jon

    I like it, and hope it’s a winner for HD. I would consider buying one. I’m 63 and started riding off road at 8. I’ve owned two Sportsters, and a long list of English, Japanese, and a Spanish bike (Bultaco way back) over the 55 years of riding.

    • DickRuble

      Maybe 63+ is the target market for this bike..

  • sgray44444

    I think they did a nice job with this.It definitely doesn’t look like a bad imitation of a British or Italian bike, and you can tell it’s a Harley from a distance. The 500 lbs. isn’t that big of a deal to me. I would like to see more displacement. If they had built this exact bike with 1200cc, priced at less than 10K, it would kill.

    • Lee Taplinger

      Good point. Sometimes it seems like displacement is free so why not use it? Just bore out what you have and improve power-to-weight, take some of the pain out of riding a heavy bike. Case in point, an 883 Sportster weighs the same as a 1200 Sportster.

  • Just did a video on this. Looks promising!! https://youtu.be/Z4eTvodJ458

  • Craig Hoffman

    I hope Harley sells a lot of thse because this bike is reasonably priced and it looks pretty cool, Time will tell but just maybe this bike has some SV650 magic dust in it that makes it fun to ride for us irrational humans, ,Some bikes are just fun and that trait does not necessarily show up on the spec sheet, this bike looks potentially fun.

  • Douglas

    I find it rather desirable, but if I sprung for one, 1st thing to go wd be the 80-ish headlite housing, replaced with a medium size windshield. I’ve ridden the roads too long behind stone-and-debris-throwing trucks to go without one again. Also wonder why H-D thinks every bike has to have those damnable dished seats, where you’re stuck in one position. Look at a Triumph seat…..nice & flat, fairly wide, and room for the occasional tootsie ya might wanna take along. ‘Course, as mentioned above, H-D wants to get their sticky little digits into yr wallet for a couple more Benjys for a new seat….the beat goes on.

  • Sayyed Bashir

    I know the bike is assembled in the U.S. but where do the parts come from?

  • john phyyt

    This is the bike a stunt rider needs for a modern revival of EVEL KNIEVEL. Imagine a recreation with flowing cape jumping over a dozen FZ 07s. At Ceasar’s palace on this American machine.

  • michael jackson

    Well back,in 1990,s Harleys look like Harleys I have 98 1200 custom. 96 softtail. My feeling is one of the last quality Harleys built. U know the twin cam nightmare and fuel,injected these bike lost there, Harleys,personality very sad that CARB has taken the balls away from Harleys

    • Sayyed Bashir

      I have the 2007 Softail Custom with 96 cu in Twin Cam Balanced engine and am very happy with it. 154,000 miles so far.

    • Lee Taplinger

      I have an ’07 Sportster Roadster, first Sportster ever fuel injected, and I am very happy with it. I do not miss fiddling with a choke on cold mornings.

      • michael jackson

        Yes Lee l do understand. I’m old rider been on card bikes 4 ever. I see the point but to me a bike is living breathing machine. I connect with my bike. I tear it down rebuild it. The bike runs different and sounds different.

  • ducatirdr

    The one we would really like to see as a street bike. ->
    http://thekneeslider.com/images/2014/06/street-750-flat-tracker-side-view.jpg

    • KPC

      If HD used a modified version of THIS frame, with the new high output street engine they would rule the street oriented middleweight street bike class.
      This is why its so frustrating, they are SO close to leading a new class,(for HD), not just “me-too” ing”

  • monfort lane

    How did American hotrodding start? Ex- servicemen looking for wild times modifying,bobbing, stripping and chopping what was available. Next, they made what they needed or adapted stuff from other applications. You can buy what you want, or you can craft your own,. Do your thing, go as far as you want. Or not. Suit yourself. Who cares what somebody else thinks

  • DAVID

    Maybe if they put there V-ROD motor in this thing and weight under 500 lbs heaven forbid HD made something cutting edge!!! I don’t need 50lbs of chrome. I might take a second look if it had a V-rod motor and similar to Triumph THRUXTON 1200 R in weight and price. 20 years way too late!!!

  • ADB

    I’m still shocked that the seat was raised on a Davidson. Raised! Praise indeed. Headed the right direction. Actual suspension travel. Who would have thought? Who would have thought?

  • Joe Bogie

    Harley builds an Octane…….with 40% less power and for $2000 less. Except now you can get a brand spanking new Octane for $8600.

  • kenneth_moore

    I looked the bike over up at Daytona. The demo lines were extremely long so I didn’t ride it.

    It’s a nice looking machine; sort of an “sporty Japanese cruiser look.” What I’d really like to see is how it looks after a year or two of riding and weather. It may not age well; the finish and materials didn’t look as high a quality as you’d see on a Honda or Yamaha. That’s strictly subjective, of course.

    I doubt anyone is going to trade in their FZ-7 for one, but it may get new people into HD dealerships for their first “real bike.”

  • Joe Bogie

    With Victory closing, you can get a brand new Octane or Vegas 8-Ball for $8600…….no way in Hell, I’d choose this bike over those!