Confirming our earlier suspicions, Ducati announced it would present its new V-4 engine Sept. 7 at the Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli ahead of MotoGP round in Rimini, Italy.

Ducati released the image below, showing a line of Desmodromic cam followers and revealing the name “Desmosedici Stradale.”

“Stradale” is Italian for “road,” so we think the name refers to the V-4 engine’s nomenclature, as the name “Desmosedici” describes a desmodromic system with 16 valves. Or perhaps this will be Ducati’s name for its street model of its MotoGP bike, as Desmosedici D16RR was the name for Ducati’s limited-production V-4 streetbike from 2007, a bike that was also first revealed at Misano.

2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR Review

Italian V-4 Literbike Shootout: Aprilia RSV4 Factory vs. Ducati Desmosedici RR

Ducati continues to use the phrase “the sound of the new era,” so we should expect to hear the V-4 engine running at Misano (that is, if you haven’t already heard it from this spy video of Ducati’s V-4 being test at Misano).

Check back with us on Motorcycle.com on Sept. 7 for more information on the Ducati Desmosedici Stradale.

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Ducati Communities

  • Prakasit

    Count me excited!

  • Jon Jones

    Only $9650.00 for the first service!!

    • DickRuble

      You raise an excellent point. What if, in the future, especially with electric bikes becoming more common, manufacturers decided to adopt the business model of desktop printers? Sell the bike at a deep discount, even at loss, but not cheap enough that the customer will walk away from it. Then program it to need service every 3000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first. You then charge an arm and a leg for every service. You can track your customer, update software as you see fit, immobilize the bike at a distance, if customer hasn’t paid for the updates, etc…

      • Jon Jones

        Some motorbike companies are heading in this horrifying direction. Try turning off your “Service” warning on a KTM without their tablet. Soon a mechanic might not be able to work on a bike because “Training modules have not been completed!”.

        I don’t like this trend in the least. Far too much factory control over YOUR bike. Hopefully hackers and the aftermarket can keep pace with this Big Brother nonsense.

        • DickRuble

          Hackers won’t be able to do much. Consider my phone: I paid for it, I own it, but I have no control as to what software I can run on it. The manufacturer can update/change it when they want; if I don’t give permission the phone becomes useless. Etc. Thanks for the heads up on the KTM ‘service’ light. Now I know that I’ll never own one.

          • Jon Jones

            John Deere has already made it impossible for some of their products to be repaired by the “non-authorized”. Hackers in Eastern Europe have made it possible to circumvent the system.

            I’m not the brightest here. I started with carbs and points and now must deal with Can bus wizardry and multiple ECUs. I love the seamlessness of new motorbikes, but when they’re troubled it’s often brutal to repair them.

            This is why I enjoy resurrecting classics so much.

          • Born to Ride

            In the motorcycle repair industry, how much “gravy” work is there? Is there a type of job that is your bread and butter? In automotive that kind of stuff is always brakes, suspension, fluid changes, and timing belts. It seems to me that just about everything on bikes is a relative pain in the ass.

          • Jon Jones

            Good question! And we use the term “gravy work” all the time where I toil.

            Tires and minor services are the money-makers. I can swap out a pair of tires in 30 minutes on many bikes and even do a few quick freebie things. Buy the tires at our shop, and I’ll go the distance to inspect, lube, and adjust needed areas. Bring in tires you purchased on the web, and I’ll ignore your sticky bits and pretend I don’t see problems.

            Then routine carb work and ATV services are good jobs. I used to dislike ATV work, but it’s all good now. Adapt or die. Engine work is where we get screwed. There’s so many details, both minor and major. Mess one up and you’re a nincompoop.

            I hate installing almost any and all aftermarket crap. There’s always some unintended/unseen issue that crops up. Even installing a set of grips can be headache-inducing. I like OE stuff and my motorbikes are almost all completely stock.

            I’m so damn good at troubleshooting, angels weep at my amazing abilities. Years and years and years wrenching on a wide variety of bikes is the key. Disgrace and abject humiliation are excellent deterrents to failure. I’m my own harshest critic.

            Should’ve picked a more lucrative career…

          • pres68y

            Yes, but it’s near the top in personal satisfaction! 🙂

          • Jon Jones

            Love these near-intangible categories from silly surveys.

          • Born to Ride

            Dealer only tools for resetting maintenance lights is not a new phenomenon. Especially in motorcycles. I’ve been riding around with the little wrench showing on my multistrada for 20k+ miles. Thankfully Ducati was kind enough to program it to stop flashing after 2-300 miles.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            MO doesn’t know every little detail about a bike. When I took my KTM 1190 R in for the 18,600 mile service which includes valve check, the good mechanic had quit so we decided to postpone the valve check to the next time. It took the techs 30 minutes to figure out how to change the service mileage in the bike to the next one. Just a minor niggle. I still love my bike.

          • Jon Jones

            “…the good mechanic had quit…”

            Probably found a better job with a brighter future cleaning portable toilets at three-day chili cookoffs.

            And the issue with the techs having trouble resetting your service light? Understandable if you’ve ever dealt with KTM’s non-user-friendly, counterintuitive program. Of course it costs the dealer big bucks just for the privilege of renting this mess.

      • Sayyed Bashir

        What about the ECU in your car or bike reporting your speed to the authorities all the time so you get a speeding ticket in the mail automatically? Or reporting reckless driving to your insurance company so it can raise your rates automatically? Luckily self driving cars will be coming soon so we will all be droning on the freeway at the same speed. Except for us vagabond motorcyclists who will soon be outlawed out of existence.

        • Born to Ride

          Fight the power!

        • sgray44444

          Well said. Technology is quickly empowering the nanny state to take complete control of our lives. Privacy is soon to be a thing of the past.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            Yes, we all have to become outlaw bikers.

          • Born to Ride

            Or just ride analog bikes.

          • Sayyed Bashir

            There are no such things anymore. Unless you hang onto 1970’s motorcycles. People want the features provided by electronics and manufacturers are happy to oblige. No one wants to be shot down in MO reviews and comparos. Wait till they start putting chips in babies so people can be tracked everywhere all the time (for their own good, of course).

          • Born to Ride

            By analog I meant no computer throttle control or Bluetooth/wifi
            Enabled uplinks. EFI is a self contained control system.

      • sgray44444

        Maybe a little too paranoid and “1984”, but then again, maybe not. Let’s face it: the auto makers, along with the EPA, are using electronics and legislation to drive the creation of products that have an expiration date and can’t be legally fixed by anyone that isn’t on the inside. THEY control how long a product is going to last! Not only does it now cost $50k for a new truck, but that truck will be too expensive to repair at 10-15 years of age. For those of us who are able, we are violating federal law by using custom electronics or an alternate drivetrain. It’s not an “EPA-approved configuration”. The same thing will happen to all vehicles with an internal combustion engine, eventually. While I love computer controlled EFI, and it IS probably the most significant innovation to make vehicles perform reliably for a lot of miles, it is also the thing that renders them obsolete. If you want the cutting edge of performance you’re going to pay for it, and we won’t have these bikes around in any numbers for decades like the older bikes. There is definitely something to be said for the longevity and repair-ability of a KLR with a simple carburetor. Particularly if you are of my mindset and hate government intrusion of all kinds.

        • DickRuble

          Planned obsolescence is a fairly old concept. The Phoebus cartel (light bulbs) is the best known example. The US government went along with it, and, in this environment where large corporations control government, the concept is likely to gain traction. Cars already have black boxes that, in case of accidents, can be examined for many parameters.

        • Jon Jones

          Great post.

          Love my KLR.

    • Born to Ride

      I am extremely interested in learning how the maintenance is handled on the new bike. Supposedly the Panigale is a real bitch to work on and the costs reflect it. I’ll stick to air cooled for my Ducati fix. That desert sled is calling my name.

  • Alexander Pityuk

    So, with above photo, is Ducati suggesting we should buy some of those shiny cam followers in advance?