We here at MO often cite a “more is more” attitude, so perhaps we should’ve seen this coming: a new Ducati Scrambler fitted with a large 1079cc air-cooled Desmodue V-Twin that’s been retooled from the old Monster 1100. And not only is the engine bigger than the 803cc mill in the earlier Scramblers, but so is its new trellis frame, which opens up the riding position to better suit larger riders. And joining the standard version will be a Scrambler 1100 Special (“which draws its inspiration from the custom world”) and the Scrambler 1100 Sport, which is equipped with Öhlins suspension.

“The Ducati Scrambler 1100 aims to meet the needs of even the most demanding, expert motorcyclists – but without compromising the fun, style and freedom that Scrambler stands for,” boasts a Ducati media release. “A beefier bike with a bigger engine and an even better set of standard equipment that lets riders upgrade without leaving the Scrambler family.” In addition to the larger 1079cc motor (with only a mild 86 claimed ponies) and new chassis, the Scrambler 1100s also receive higher-level brake and suspension components, plus new switchgear and Bosch 9.1 MP Cornering ABS. Four-level traction control is also standard equipment across the 1100 line. Its wet weight is claimed to be 454 pounds; 465 for the Special. Up front is a fully adjustable 45mm inverted fork from Kayaba (Öhlins on the Sport version), with a pair of radial-mount 4-piston Brembo M4.32B monobloc calipers biting on 320mm discs. New wheels with machine-finished spokes carry enduro-type Pirelli MT60RS tires, with a 120/80-ZR18 on the front specially designed for use on the Scrambler. In the middle, underneath the funky fuel tank with the removable aluminum side panels, is a clean-appearing air-cooled desmodue V-Twin featuring machined cooling-fins and cam-belt covers to provide visual highlights. Airbox covers are nice bits of aluminum. Power delivery is adjustable via three modes: Active, with all 86 of the horses, a direct throttle connection and a sporty traction-control level; Journey, also with full power but softer responses; and City, which drops horsepower to 75 and dials up TC intervention. Much thought went into the design of the Scrambler 1100’s seating accommodations, with each version getting its own uniquely contoured saddle, but all of them feature an embroidered Ducati logo at the rear. Ducati says the seats are “more generously shaped than its Scrambler 800 counterpart.” Underneath is an aluminum subframe with machine-finished trim. Ducati says the seat-footpeg distance is increased over the 800 Scrambler, and the handlebar ends are further forwards and lower. A USB socket resides under the seat for recharging mobile devices. At the rear is a direct-acting shock with spring preload and rebound damping adjustments. The 1100 Sport, again, features a fully adjustable Öhlins damper but also lacks compression-damping adjustability. A 180/55-ZR17 Pirelli gets the Scrambler’s power to the ground and nearly 6 inches of wheel travel is provided at each end. The face of the Scrambler 1100 is graced by a new round headlight that would harken back to earlier times but for the distinctive X pattern over it and a bright LED ring around its rim that acts as a Daytime Running Light. Primary lighting comes from a “Blue Vision” bulb, which emits a white hue to match the LED DRL. The LED taillight makes use of a technology said to be unique in motorcycling, with a “softening” effect which is produced by using a dulled diffuser cover. The Scrambler 1100’s instrument panel now includes a secondary element to the Scrambler 800’s round dial. The round section displays fuel level, riding mode and the TC level, along with dual tripmeters, miles of fuel remaining and air temperature. The new oval element has a speedo and can display information from the Ducati Multimedia System, available as an accessory when the Bluetooth module is fitted. Further information about the new Scrambler 1100 series follows. Features listed for the base model are also equipped on the higher-end Special and Sport version. Pricing is not yet available.

Colors: “’62 Yellow” or “Shining Black” with black frame and black seat

  • Steel teardrop fuel tank with interchangeable aluminum side panels
  • Low 31.9 inch seat height
  • Wide handlebars for light steering and a more relaxed riding position
  • Round headlight with glass lens and LED DRL ring
  • Diffused LED tail light
  • Dual-element LCD instrument panel
  • 1079cc air-cooled Desmodue V-twin engine
  • Machine-finished aluminum belt covers
  • Twin spar steel trellis frame with aluminum subframe
  • Double sided swingarm
  • 10-spoke wheels in light alloy, 18 inch at the front and 17 inch at the rear
  • Enduro-styled Pirelli tires optimised for the Ducati Scrambler
  • Bosch Cornering ABS
  • Traction Control
  • 3 Riding Modes (Active, Journey and City)

Colors: “Custom Grey” with black frame and black spoked wheels

  • Low, tapered handlebars
  • Adjustable fork and shock
  • Aluminum front/rear mudguard
  • Dedicated seat shape
  • Chrome exhaust pipes
  • Gold-anodized fork tubes

Colors: “Viper Black” with yellow tank sides and dual yellow striping down the middle of the tank and mudguards, with black frame and wheels

  • Low, tapered aluminum handlebars
  • Dedicated seat shape
  • Adjustable Öhlins fork and Öhlins shock

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Ducati Communities

  • spiff

    There are so many different bike options now, it is a great time to be a buyer. I wonder if it puts pressure on the dealerships. More elaborate floor plans are expensive.

    • JMDGT

      Go Spiff end transmission.

  • R_Melaun

    I’m pretty sure it doesn’t have a 13.96 gallon fuel tank. Just sayin’. Sport version looks good.

    • denchung

      Right you are. It should be 3.96 gallons.

  • Alaskan18724

    Ooooh. More better Ducati.

  • DickRuble

    That’s not an air cooled engine. Maybe oil cooled.

    • Born to Ride

      It’s air cooled. There is no oil jacket cooling the cylinders.

      • DickRuble

        What’s that radiator in front of the cylinders?

        • Born to Ride

          Cooling the oil that gets sprayed on the back of the pistons and lubricates the bearings and articulating components. Like every other engine?

          • DickRuble

            Do you see an oil radiator on Harleys or on older Ducatis, or on your Multistrada? Oil sprayed on the back of pistons? Oil jacket cooling cylinders? You’re reading too much Sci-Fi.

          • Born to Ride

            That was my point(albeit written poorly), the cylinders are still cooled by air, oil pumping through the case cools the head and transfers heat from the pistons, rods, and crank to the oil cooler, like just about every other motorcycle. Every single motorcycle I’ve owned has had an oil cooler, even the water cooled ones like the SV650 and Sprint 1050. Im aware not every bike has an oil cooler, but I’m pretty sure every one you listed does.

    • gjw1992

      And be consistent throughout! Kg weight would be nice but especially fuel tank cap in litres as well as US gallons (I don’t expect imperial gallons!).

      • Born to Ride

        Why would an American publication post the weight in KG? Unless you wanted both.

  • DickRuble

    Too heavy for the power. The linkless suspension is just garbage, especially at what they charge, and a joke when you call a bike “sport”. It’s a waste of Ohlins. May be acceptable for a $5k commuter. They assume the target buyer would not know any better.

  • Alaskan18724

    If you sqint, also scratches the Mini Trail 50 itch. Especially in yellow.

  • Born to Ride

    I feel like I should be jumping for joy at the return of the 1100 desmodue but I’m left scratching my head thinking “why”? The scrambler didn’t need more power, weight, and expense. They should have released this on the Monster first, and then seen what the reception was. I feel like this is going to sell poorly. They really had to strangulate the poor big bore engine to pass emissions too. The last iteration of the 1100 made 100hp(88-90rwhp) and this one is rated at the crank for what my bikes Dyno at. I just don’t see it, I’ll have to ride the bike. I still think the Sled is hands down my favorite.

    • spiff

      What if you are physically larger, and learning to ride. Not saying this is a good beginner bike, but it could be.

      I’ve seen an XR650 as a learners bike. I have to say it was an excellent choice. Very factory tame, and he uncorcked it once he was confident.

      Do you think it would make similar power to your bike if the intake and exhaust were freed up? I wonder how much is different inside.

      • Born to Ride

        I feel like they used the new Triumph bonnevile as their performance benchmark. More power than the 1200? Check. Significantly lighter? Check. Better suspension and brakes? Check. The problem is that they need to look at what they are offering and not what other factories are offering for justification for expanding a model line.

      • Born to Ride

        I’d guess that they are running lower compression pistons and different cams from previous bikes in addition to the intake and exhaust. But then again this is RBW so there could be some electronic trickery strangling the engine too.

        • Sylvain

          Compression is at 11:1 so right between the original Monster 1100 (10.7) and the Evo (11.3). The difference comes from the single vs dual throttle bodies.

          • Born to Ride

            Oh good eye! I guess I glossed over the tech specs in my read-through.

  • Jaame Wolfaardt

    Give me dual clutch transmission plus drive shaft…..

    • Kenneth

      Enjoy you new Gold Wing!

      • Jaame Wolfaardt

        Kenneth, please stay on topic. We are talking about a scrambler. Dual clutch control like the Africa twin and Drive shaft like the RnineT scrambler.

  • JMDGT

    I am a fan of this engine and the Scrambler. The geometry of these bikes in my opinion does not always translate into the versions Ducati has come up with. The special is tits. Pricing will be paramount to the success of these versions. All things being equal in the marketplace differentiators at any given price point sans any emotional appeal will make or break a buy decision. I like the current Desert Sled and would love to have one. And a Special. And a Panigale. And a SuperSport. And a Monster. I need a Ducati.

    • DickRuble

      A lightly used 1100 EVO Monster (2012) with Ohlins will likely set you back about $7500, less than half what they will charge for this bike. Same engine, +20hp, real suspension.

      • JMDGT

        Well said. I hear you Dick. I thought the same.

        • DickRuble

          I take that back. The Monster also has a link-less suspension. Well.. a used Monster still makes more sense, if you absolutely have to have a Ducati. I wouldn’t buy either.

          • JMDGT

            Compared to other naked bikes a Monster doesn’t always stack up to the competition. If I think about it the Speed Triple appeals to me more. I wouldn’t mind having a Desert Sled however.

          • Born to Ride

            The Monster(air cooled) rides like a bike 50lbs lighter compared to the speed triple. They are very very different bikes and awesome in their own ways.

          • JMDGT

            I came close to buying an EVO. They had one at the dealer Newport back when it was new. I should have bought it.

          • Born to Ride

            I found that the gen 3 Monster was a better sportbike, but the gen 2 was a better motorcycle. I’d love to see what the gen 4 with the 1100 engine would ride like.

          • Born to Ride

            I got rid of my ohlins equipped 1100S mostly because I lacked confidence in the rear end. Plus the riding position was horrendous even with my 30” inseam.

          • Sylvain

            Did you get rid of your Monster 1100S or Multistrada 1100S?
            I’ve got a Monster 1100S and once I replaced the overly stock stiff shock spring (130NM) by what Ohlins recommends (115NM) and the bike was transformed.

          • Born to Ride

            It wasn’t overly stiff for me, I weigh 220 and change with my gear on. At least it felt like the sag was appropriate. Never had it professionally set but I did adjust it until I found the best balance to my highly trained heinie. I found my multistrada to be just as quick as the Monster and 100% more confident in the rear suspension.

          • Sylvain

            I have been looking for a Multistrada 1100S for a while for multi-days two-up riding. It is actually difficult to find a good one with panniers and top box nowadays. And the looks have grown on me, sort of a poor man’s Turismo Veloce.

          • Born to Ride

            My Local craigslist is littered with prime cherry examples. Fully loaded and barely past their first service. That’s how I bought mine almost 2 years ago, now I’m pushing 38k on the clock. Best bike I have ever owned.

      • Born to Ride

        Cheaper. But this bike has a much more relaxed mentality. Cruiserish if you may.

  • lennon2017

    The instrument panel is a joke, right? It has to be a joke. The company that prides itself of its design chops hasn’t just inserted a digital twinkie into the temple of the dial. No way. Nuh-uh. (And if next year’s standard scramblers get that enhancement, holy sabotage, batman.)

    • SerSamsquamsh

      It goes with the ugly banana swingarm though!

  • spiff

    A Ducati cruiser. Bring on the Fat Bob, Bonneville, etc.

    Now that Harley has updated their Soft Tails it is an open game. The new Harleys look like a Japanese version of what the next Harley should look like. I can’t see a new generation of riders having the same lust and commitment to the new Harleys. Now the competition is offering cool bikes that are not HD clones. Lots of cool options.

    • Born to Ride

      The funny thing is that I have always thought the Diavel would have been a much better bike all around with the 1100EVO engine and a 200mm rear tire, and now that Ducati has brought a bike that functionally takes up that mantle, I am not drawn to it.

  • DucatiDave

    WTF is up with that front brake line??? Horrible looking Ducati, never thought I would write that!