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Old 03-06-2002, 05:38 PM   #11
badsac
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Default Re: Year 2002 Yamaha R1 dyno run

Damn that preview button! I'm a risk taker!



I guess the results of how you run a bike in might have something to do with the model. A couple of years ago, we bought two new DR350's. They seemed eactly the same for a start. On one of them, I ran it in properly, doing everything by the book. The other I flogged like a horny teenager from the start. The one I took it easy with had heaps of grunt in the mid-range but just wouldn't rev very well. The one I flogged was a bit weaker in the midrange, but flew at the top end. It was an amazing difference.



Actually, I'm with you on wheelies. I've got a mate with a GSXR1000 and all he'll do is wheelies. I personally think they're pretty useless.



Perhaps with this bike it's less prone to the not-wanted variety, but with the excellent throttle response, they might be a nice thing to pull wheelies on when you want to do them.



Or else Burns is letting his over active imagination get the better of him.
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Old 03-06-2002, 05:40 PM   #12
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Default Re: Year 2002 Yamaha R1 dyno run

I guess it might be fair to assume that MO has an optimistic Dyno. Makes comparisons with other mags difficult, but all the bikes tested here are on a level playing field.
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Old 03-06-2002, 05:59 PM   #13
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Default Video?

Where is the video of the dyno run?
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Old 03-06-2002, 07:40 PM   #14
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Default Re: Year 2002 Yamaha R1 dyno run

I agree, what counts is if the bikes are dynoed on the same machine at the same time to minimize any atmospheric fluctuations. I know it's a pain in the a$$ MO, but it would be nice if you dynoed all the bikes together when you do the liter bike comparo.
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Old 03-06-2002, 08:48 PM   #15
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Default Questions......

Two questions, basically.

1. Why do the american R1s have bigger indicators than the european ones?

and

2. What is the difference between torque and power? Now don't gimme that "torque is the property of the engine to turn the crankshaft...etc" crap 'cause I arready know that. What I want to know is that when you're riding, how do you know that right now it's the torque working and now the power.
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Old 03-06-2002, 11:53 PM   #16
harvz
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Default What happened to the 954 used for a previous comarison?!?

Hey MO, what happened to the 954 that was used for the comparo between it and the '01 R1? Couldn't it be used for the Superbike comparo?



My buying decision is stuck between the new R1 and the 954 (but leaning toward the new R1), and I cant' wait for a head-to-head comparison of the two. I'd hate to have to wait for some once-a-month print mag to do the comparo.

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Old 03-07-2002, 12:20 AM   #17
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Default Re: Questions......

1. Who knows? Maybe Yamaha thinks that americans have worse eyesight than europeans. Maybe a federal law has a minimium size for indicators; we all know how uncle sam likes to interfere with seemingly pointless areas of our lives.



2. Torque is basically what gets the bike moving, the low-end grunt. Once it's moving, horsepower keeps the bike moving and accelerating. Notice how two-stroke engines (low torque, big HP) don't seem to make much power at low RPM but have screaming power at high RPM where you rev them to in order to get going, and diesel engines (masses of torque, low HP) seem to have mass power at just off-idle RMP but fall flat on their faces at RPMs that seem ridiculously low, explaining their short redline. Torque and horsepower are a function of each other; given one, you can calculate the other with a set equation. This is why the torque and HP curves will always cross at 5252 RPM, on any dyno chart you look at.



So basically, at any RPM below 5252 the torque is working and at any RPM above 5252 the power (HP) is working.
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Old 03-07-2002, 02:58 AM   #18
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Default Re: Year 2002 Yamaha R1 dyno run

it's almost non-existant. In love? Try enslaved.
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Old 03-07-2002, 03:01 AM   #19
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Default Re: Year 2002 Yamaha R1 dyno run

Great Idea. I am glad I though of it.
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Old 03-07-2002, 03:13 AM   #20
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Default Check it out

That's kind of a weird way to put it, but's it's pretty much right. Yes, torque is a function of power, but you don't see one before/without the other. You have some engines that don't even rev up to 5000 rpm, but they will have 300lbs/ft of torque and only 175 HP. The torque is the turning motion of the pistons/crank etc, or the force of the piston, and the rpm comes into play and at the end you have an amount of work the engine is doing, which is horsepower. You can't have one without the other. HP is just the end product, so you can have an engine that revs to the moon with little torque, but it does as much work at a certain (high) rpm as an engine with low rpm and high torque.



Just imagine a tiny tire turning really fast and covering the same distance as a big tire turning really slow and you have some sort of an analogy. See, it takes less force to turn that little tire once, where as it's hard to turn the big tire once. But, to make the little tire cover a mile, you have to turn it a million times where the big tire you only have to turn it 100,000 times, but in the end you do the same amount of work.



I guess I didn't make it any better.
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