Motorcycle Forum

Motorcycle Forum (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/)
-   Women Riders (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/women-riders/)
-   -   Beginner rider - difficulty stopping (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/women-riders/8554-beginner-rider-difficulty-stopping.html)

Bubblybee 06-20-2008 09:05 AM

Beginner rider - difficulty stopping
 
Hi all! I just finished up the MSF class, got my license, and my first bike. My fiance and I bought a Hyosung GT250R to learn on. We both love the bike and can ride it pretty well for just starting out. The problem for me is, I dropped the bike while trying to stop, and now every time I come to a stop I get scared to drop it and it ends up getting wobbly. It's almost 400 lbs so if it tips too far, it's gone.

I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions or tips on how to stop with a heavy bike. I can just barely flat foot it with my boots on. Do I just need to work on my balance more? Is there anything I can do that would help me with that?

sachiwilson 06-20-2008 10:25 AM

That's a nice little bike. Good choice for a starter, Bee.

An experienced rider can balance a bike at a stop. At least for a few seconds! So yes, a lot of your problems will resolve once you get more experience. You should find an empty parking lot and simply practice for an hour or so, just stopping. Keep this up over as many days as it takes for you to gain the experience and confidence you need.

And when you do this practice, focus on keeping your front wheel pointing dead straight. I'm guessing here, but I suspect that at times when you stop, at the very end of the stop you pull the bars a bit in one direction or the other. That causes the bike to lean, and . . . down it goes.

By the way, don't fret over dropping the bike. I've been riding for decades and I still drop my bike once in a while. And keep us posted on how you are doing!

12er 06-20-2008 10:38 AM

While your at it in the parking lot you can practice your slow speed riding also, uturns etc.

Buzglyd 06-20-2008 11:47 AM

You could drag your feet.

It worked for Fred Flinstone.

pushrod 06-20-2008 12:04 PM

And don't look down at your front tire!

Like they (should have) told you at the MSF course, keep your eyes on the horizon.

And both of you practice panic stops in the parking lot. You'll then be more familiar with the bike's handling.

Speaking of which, I'm reminded of the story a while back that said an analysis of accidents revealed folks did not use maximum braking before a crash. One cause was the ABS. Turns out few people know what the brakes feel like when the system kicks in, and when they had the accident, they lifted off the brake pedal when it started 'juddering'. The lesson there is to take your cage out to a big empty parking lot (preferably a wet one) and stomp on the brakes.

12er 06-20-2008 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buzglyd (Post 187510)
You could drag your feet.

It worked for Fred Flinstone.

The few Harley's Ive rode in the past made me believe I might just have too...

The_AirHawk 06-20-2008 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buzglyd (Post 187510)
You could drag your feet.

It worked for Fred Flinstone.

Yabba-Dabba OH SHYTE!!!

Bubblybee 07-27-2008 11:03 PM

I finally was able to get back out on the bike (busy like none other), and it was real shaky at first, but I just worked on stops. I only rode a short distance slowly and then stopped. My fiance and his dad were coaching me and making sure that I didn't fall. I'm definitely getting my balance on it. Probably a couple more outings and I'll be able to ride it on the street. I have absolutely no trouble riding the bike or shifting, my problems are strictly with stopping. I'm excited that I'm making some progress, though.

Thanks for your help.

acecycleins 07-28-2008 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bubblybee (Post 190069)
I finally was able to get back out on the bike (busy like none other), and it was real shaky at first, but I just worked on stops. I only rode a short distance slowly and then stopped. My fiance and his dad were coaching me and making sure that I didn't fall. I'm definitely getting my balance on it. Probably a couple more outings and I'll be able to ride it on the street. I have absolutely no trouble riding the bike or shifting, my problems are strictly with stopping. I'm excited that I'm making some progress, though.

Thanks for your help.


Take the bike to the dealer and have him set the "sag" for your weight. Even though your man weighs more, the point of the bike is training. He'll loose a little comfort because the shock is set up different but you'll gain stability. Ask the tech if you could move the fork legs (not sure if they are built that way) a little to lower the front. It's only centimeters that you're looking for. If you don't want to go to that extreme then find thicker soled shoes.

sachiwilson 07-28-2008 08:06 AM

Good! I'm glad to hear that practice is helping.

What sort of things are your fiance and his dad suggesting for you when they coach you?


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:11 AM.