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Old 03-19-2008, 07:14 PM   #1
keny
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Default 2 Lady drivers wanted to set records. Men to build bikes.

Hi All

Lady motorcycle drivers wanted to set records, fully
sponsored. Men need to build bikes.

Full Sponsorship to lady M/C drivers.
Ladies come join us and set World Land Speed motorcycle records!

We are looking for two additional lady riders and men to build their race bikes. fully sponsored to the lady motorcycle drivers. Thanks Kenny Lyon

Bonneville Motorcycle Racing--Women drivers and Men needed

We have a women motorcycle racing team. We are looking for lady riders to set Bonneville World Land Speed Records. Must live in the LA area of Calif. Single, Fit, Age 18 to 27, not taller than 5'6".

We need men to build the bikes and pit crew for the ladies. The bikes are completely sponsored to the lady rider.

We train you to ride safety. I have worked with seven women, who all together have set 18 Bonneville World Land Speed Records. We have set records with BMW, Harley, Honda, and Triumph motorcycles. See the Nov/Dec 2007 issue of Red Rider Magazine, and December 2007 WingWorld Magazine. Filmed for National Geographic TV , and NBC's Jeep World of Adventure Sports.
My Double engine Harley ran 190 mph in 1983 and was featured in EasyRider Magazine. View it at Bob Alford's , my Brother in Christ, web pages at: www. prostreetchoppersinc. com

You and your friends would be welcome to check out our shop where we work on the bikes. We are located at Compton Air Port, 901 West Alondra Blvd. , Compton, Ca. 90220. We are in Hanger H-8.

Please phone ahead, so we can get you in through Homeland Security.
Thank you for your interest.

Kenny Lyon (310) 637 6094
kenylyon@hotmail. com www. goldwingracingproject.. www. projectgoldwing. org

Feel free to post this!

Kim's Story ( Kim has set five World Land Speed Records. )
How Bonneville compares to The World’s Fastest Indian
It’s finally Friday, and the Bonneville races have officially ended. I’m on a plane back home to USC and I just finished watching The World’s Fastest Indian once again seeing how it measured up to my experience.

My Bonneville Experience
I’m on the starting line about to do a run on a 1949 500cc Vintage Triumph. I can feel my heart pounding through my old mustard Bates leathers while my hands shake as I grasp the clutch. There are people crowded around everywhere I look excitedly waiting for me to take off. The National Geographic camera crew is standing in front of me zooming in the lens to my nervous eyes. I repeat the steps I learned at American Honda school a few months prior in my head: ease off throttle, pull in the clutch, shift, slowly release clutch, accelerate, cruise, repeat.
My mind crosses Burt Munro and how he used to borrow this exact bike from Isky when he was in Los Angeles. But all I can think about is crashing into the wall the last time I sat on the magenta seat of this bike. What will happen this time? Are the bumps in the salt going to throw me off? Will the engine fail? Will I be able to shift with the new clutch and the new awkward positioning of the pegs? My team leader, Kenny Lyon says "kickstand up", I pull in the clutch, and he puts me in first. I signal "two" to Bill Taylor, letting him know that I will be pulling off after the 2 mile marker, and he starts waving me forward. Now my heart is pounding. I try to remember all the quotes I told myself that led me to Bonneville.
I slowly start releasing the clutch waiting for the gears to engage, releasing, waiting, releasing, waiting. Am I in neutral? I’m barely holding on at my fingertips now. One more millimeter, the bike is rolling forward and I’m off the starting line. Driving down the flats, everything’s bumpy, I need to get into second, and I need to adjust my positioning. Ok, where are the pegs? Reach my feet back, lift them higher, alright I reached it. Feel the shifter with my right heel. Got it. Ok, pull in the clutch, kick down with my heel. Let go of the clutch, everything is sputtering, pull back on the throttle, alright, I did it! This feels great. Do it again to third. Clutch, shift, clutch, throttle. I see the 1 mile marker. Should I shift up into high gear before I reach it? Let’s do it, one more time. Now I’m in fourth! I can feel the air blowing all around me. I duck behind the windshield, imitating what I imagine Burt Munro would have done when he was on this motorcycle. Now it’s just about accelerating. I start singing my favorite song in my head motivating me to eliminate any fear and go faster. "Scars heal, glory fades, and all we’re left with are the memories made, Pain hurts, but only for a minute, life is short so go on and live it. " The handle bars are vibrating through my fingers damaged from the crash, the gas tank is vibrating on my chest, my knees tucked into the sides can feel the engine heat up, the salt is bouncy, I’m holding on. Accelerate more, you only live once. I look down at my old World War II airplane tachometer displaying "30. " This should be around 65 mph. I’m going through the Mile 2, accelerate a little more, see if you can bring it up anymore, 2 º. I did it. I set a record.
I’ve heard some people come to Bonneville all their lives and never set a record. I’m 20 years old, before January ‘06 I had never rode a motorcycle. Since then, I have been on a bike 6 times going a max speed of 30 mph. The last time I rode this Triumph, I crashed into a cement wall, bent the handle bars, broke off the clutch, and rewarded myself with some bloody fingers, scraped up arms, bruised legs and deteriorated confidence. I had just completed a run of 73mph. Probably one of the slowest records to be set at Bonneville, but for me, this was huge.
Bobbie, the other lady rider for Kenny Lyon, and I, went on to set 4 records total during this week before the bikes began giving up due to salt conditions, wear and tear, or just exhaustion. Before I was able to get my D license on the Goldwing, and Bobbie was able to two records of 132 and 140 on this bike.
I need to thank Kenny Lyon for giving me this opportunity. Not many people would have faith in someone with my level of experience. thanks Kimberly
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Old 03-20-2008, 08:32 AM   #2
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One does not "drive" a motorcycle.

Other than that, an honorable effort. I wish you all luck!
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Old 03-20-2008, 12:04 PM   #3
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I've been told they do pretty good and cheap sex change operations in Copenhagen.

- cruiz-euro
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Old 03-20-2008, 12:16 PM   #4
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That's out of date. Thailand is the place to go. Good docs, inexpensive compared to the American physicians.
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Old 03-20-2008, 12:17 PM   #5
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I've been told they do pretty good and cheap sex change operations in Copenhagen.

- cruiz-euro
I'm in for $10. Do I mail you the check or do you have a PayPal account?
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:23 PM   #6
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The ladies I have worked with would rather be noted as "driving" the motorcycle. "Riding" the motorcycle means being on the back seat.
I have worked with seven women, who all together have set 18 Bonneville World Land Speed Records, and none were on the back seat.
Thanks for the reply.
Kenny
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:52 PM   #7
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gee, none of the women I know and ride with use that term. Try again, Ken.
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Old 03-20-2008, 08:31 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by keny View Post
The ladies I have worked with would rather be noted as "driving" the motorcycle. "Riding" the motorcycle means being on the back seat.
I have worked with seven women, who all together have set 18 Bonneville World Land Speed Records, and none were on the back seat.
Thanks for the reply.
Kenny
Personally, I prefer the term "piloting the motorcycle", as it's more-akin to flying than driving a car.
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Old 03-21-2008, 06:20 AM   #9
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gee, none of the women I know and ride with use that term. Try again, Ken.
Every time I hear someone say "drive" a bike, it grates my nerves.
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Old 03-21-2008, 06:25 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Kenneth_Moore View Post
Every time I hear someone say "drive" a bike, it grates my nerves.
The ONLY people who say it are people who know absolutely nothing about bikes and have never ridden. Makes me wonder what the real motivation behind this post is.
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