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Old 02-27-2008, 05:19 PM   #31
sfcdjevans
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A plank, a pile of dirt and 20" ballon tires. Now that was fun. The inevitable trip to the hospital never ended with a call from the insurance company insisting that you divulge the name of the owner of said pile who had the audacity to have a pile of dirt unsecured. What happened? I recently had a bit of an entanglement with one of mother natures creatures. "No no one owned the animal", "I see your going to take actions against me for not divulging the name of the animals owner, uh huh.". Oh this has the all the signs of a rant. I'll leave now.
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Old 02-27-2008, 08:43 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfcdjevans View Post
What happened? I recently had a bit of an entanglement with one of mother natures creatures. "No no one owned the animal", "I see your going to take actions against me for not divulging the name of the animals owner, uh huh.". Oh this has the all the signs of a rant. I'll leave now.
Silly, as everything not owned by a Private Citizen or Corporation is technically "owned" by a Government Entity, it should be a simple-matter of pinning the blame on George W. Bush.

He can be reached at 1-800-SIEG-HEIL, extension 666.

You're Welcome.



(Zzzzzzzt-PLOIPT! trolltrolltrolltrolltroll.......)
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:43 AM   #33
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Brilliant answer! I should have provided the nearest DEC office address and phone number.

So what color lure are you running and at what depth and temprature?
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:30 AM   #34
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I had the custom chopper bicycle growing up. Handled like a pig but was comfy and loooooong. We took 3ft 1" tubing to make the fork extenders, I had a 10" front wheel from a "swingbike" that I destroyed and a big ole fat white wall on the back, used a beach cruiser frame. Then the ape hangers, black banana seat and about a 4ft sissy bar. Played with the mini steering wheel conversion but the ape hangers looked and worked much better.
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Old 03-04-2008, 04:57 PM   #35
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You may want to reconsider getting a smaller bike to learn on. I am
5'7" and started on a 250 rebel. After riding that for about 6 months,I sold it for a 750 shadow. Last summer I traded the shadow in for a Victory V92C. Learning to ride is a process. There is no way I would have been able to handle/control the 1500cc bike when I was just learning. With the smaller bike, you gain so much knowledge. It is easier to learn the mechanics of riding. I got a huge education when I jumped from the 750 to the 1500! The bigger bikes are less forgiving with brain farts then the smaller bikes. Just remembering what gear you are in when down shifting is a big one! I found that out on a 1,000 mile trip on my Victory-almost dumped the bike. I won't make that mistake again. But I know I did with the smaller bikes and it was ok.

I would advise getting a smaller bike to start out with before jumping on a big bike. There is so much to learn about riding when you are a new rider. Fighting a bigger bike is really not the best way to go. I have only been riding for 4 years! On a side note, I sold my rebel for what I paid for it. And when I traded the Honda Shadow in, they gave me what I paid for it too.
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Old 03-04-2008, 05:12 PM   #36
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Good Advice, well said.
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Old 03-22-2008, 11:18 PM   #37
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Default Just bought 2nd Ladies Bike.

I just upgraded from a small bike after owning it for one year and I agree it is best to start out with what you want to keep for a while. I looked at the Suzuki S50, M50, the Honda Shadow Aero and Spirit, the Sportster, and the Bonneville. I really think it is important to go and sit on the bikes, possibly take them for a demo ride, and decide that way. I liked the Bonneville the best. Ergonomically, it is exactly what I was looking for, and after coming to a hard stop on new tires on a wet road, I was grateful I bought the bike because it handles well and is extremely forgiving of operator errors. Even my husband was/is very impressed with the bike. The only disadvantage was I had to buy new because it appears noone wants to sell their Triumph once they buy! Good luck with your purchase!

Casey
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Old 03-23-2008, 09:46 AM   #38
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There is no advice so good as that coming from the Voice of Experience.

Enjoy your new Moto!
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Parfois, on fait pas semblant
Sometimes, it's not pretend
Oderint Dum Metuant
Let them hate so long as they fear
политики предпочитают безоружных крестьян
Politicians Prefer Unarmed Peasants
Nothing to see here, Citizen. Move along now...
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:11 AM   #39
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Bonnevilles are excellent bikes, good choice. I had a T100 for a little over a year and really enjoyed it. Look up TriumphRat.Net for some neat people to chit chat with.
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Old 05-09-2008, 04:12 PM   #40
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I am an 3 year experienced rider. I have both a Triumph Bonneville and a vulcan 800. I do not recommned the Bonnie as a 1st bike, unless you are comfortable with the seating position. The new Vulcan 900 is very comfortable, low center of gravity. You need to go to a used bike dealer and sit on a lot of variety until you find one that suits you.

Take the Motorccyle Safety Foundation class near you to get some experience actually riding dif kinds of bikes before you make a purchase. Let that bicycle you bought without riding teach you a $100 lesson, so you dont make a several 1000 mistake.

Buy a used bike to start with, because you WILL drop it, and a TINY scratch takes off hundreds in value.
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Last edited by sachiwilson : 05-09-2008 at 04:30 PM. Reason: Good advice, terrible post
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