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Old 06-27-2009, 10:54 AM   #1
Jollynette
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Unhappy very sore tailbone!!

Hi, I've been riding for a few years but am finding my tailbone to be getting very sore even riding short distances. Does anyone else have this issue and what are some possible solutions? I have purchased a gelpad for my seat and also have a different seat from the stock. I ride a 2005 Sportster Custom.....what can you suggest????
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Old 06-27-2009, 11:13 AM   #2
seruzawa
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The seating position itself is probably placing the weight directly on your tailbone. Humans aren't really designed to sit that way unless they have a backrest to take much of the weight off. You could tie a sleeping bag on the rear seat pad and use it for a back rest. Try it and see what happens. That worked for me on my Shovelhead.
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Old 06-27-2009, 12:28 PM   #3
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The Custom had forward pegs, which, as seruzawa points out, puts all your weight on your tailbone. More ergonomic bikes let you lean into the handlebars a bit as well as take some weight on your thighs and feet. Try seruzawa's solution, if that doesn't help, you can retro-fit the Custom with mid-pegs and "drag bars" to get you leaning forward a bit.
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Old 06-27-2009, 12:59 PM   #4
pushrod
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+1 on the foot-forward tail problem.

Put mid controls on it, and the tailbone trouble will be behind you (HAR!).
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Old 06-27-2009, 09:31 PM   #5
Jollynette
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thanks for the advice....I do pack my large duffle on the back so I can use it as a backrest which helps somewhat....I do have forward controls, thinking of putting crash bars and highway pegs on to stretch legs a bit....wondering if a touring bike of sort or dyna would be an option in the future for next purchase....bigger seat area??more cush for my tush??
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:29 AM   #6
pdad13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jollynette View Post
thanks for the advice....I do pack my large duffle on the back so I can use it as a backrest which helps somewhat....I do have forward controls, thinking of putting crash bars and highway pegs on to stretch legs a bit....wondering if a touring bike of sort or dyna would be an option in the future for next purchase....bigger seat area??more cush for my tush??
Sounds to me like that's exactly what you don't want to do.

Highway pegs will likely just make you rotate more weight onto your tailbone. What the fine gentlemen here have been saying is that you need to get your legs under you and lean forward slightly. It's how you sit on a "standard" bike.

Here's your basic problem: Cruisers generally have feet-forward riding positions. While they look real comfy--sort of like a lounge chair--they don't really work all that well if you're going to be on the bike for extended periods of time. Without any real lower back support, all of your weight is focused on your tailbone. Plus, you're more or less locked into one position, so you can't use your legs to move around a bit or support any of that weight. Add to that the fact that cruisers have limited shock travel--concussions go right up your tailbone and spine--and you've got a seriously uncomfortable situation.

Since everyone's different, some people have more trouble with this than others. Sounds like you're one of them. A new seat might help a little, but what you really need to do is rotate your body forward, not backward.
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Old 06-29-2009, 09:05 AM   #7
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Hi,

Yep, what the guys have said. To test it out, borrow a "standard" bike and ride it a bit. I ride vintage bikes, and they are "sit up" standards with regular controls, and I don't have that problem at all. I ride my '77 regularly from north of Seattle to Montana and back, and while my whole body gets tired, my lower back seems to be just fine. I have a regular seat, and no back-rest, with about a 3" rise in the handlebars.

So either borrow a bike, or go into a dealer for a "test ride", and see if it helps. If it does, you've found the solution. If not, then maybe you need to check out other seats?

Good luck with it--riding is no fun if it hurts!
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Old 06-29-2009, 04:40 PM   #8
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You could put some drag bars on to get that cool folded like a clam look while riding that you see on some custom choppers. Or check out Corbin and see if they make a solo seat with a backrest or both... I cant ride cruisers for the same reason. I'm way too tall with too long of arms to get any forward lean. Hence my ergonomically correct BMW. Ideally you should have a little forward lean so that bumps dont go directly to your lower back and that you also lay a little into the wind so your not holding on for dear life. Cruisers typically do not fit this ideal...

I often tell first time cruiser buyers when I see them sitting in a show room "comfy isn't it?" "now picture that with an 70mph head wind and bumps shooting up your spine." Then, not so much...
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