Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle Riding > Women Riders

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-25-2009, 10:11 PM   #11
mscuddy
MODERATOR X

 
mscuddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Next to my still checkin the temp.
Posts: 5,448
Default

Jeez, that a steep learing curve, starting out on a 500 lb. machine. If you can master that, more power to ya...but if it were me, I'd start off in the dirt on a 125 four stroke. Dirt is a lot softer than concrete, and there's no curbs to worry about, or cars. You'll learn how to handle a slide, bumps and rocks, which will make dealing with emergency situaitons on the pavement a lot easier.

Good luck!
__________________
A gun is a tool, Marian; no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.
mscuddy is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 05-25-2009, 11:35 PM   #12
Vonov
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 14
Default

+1 to what mscuddy said.

I hate to say it, but I'm not going to sugarcoat this---I think a Sportster is a really bad choice for someone at your stage of experience...the center of gravity is fairly high, and the handling is not friendly to an inexperienced rider...I'd been riding a 500 lb bike for three years when I got on my buddy's Sportster, and it was a handful at first (and I'm a fair-sized guy)---in addition to the things I've already mentioned, it had considerably more torque than I was used to, and wheelies are only fun if you're expecting them. I didn't dump it, but I sure came close at first. My advice to you is to pick up something like a small metric cruiser, used, (Honda's 250 Rebel comes to mind) and get used to that. Once you've gotten fully confident with that, you'll be ready for a bigger bike, (a LOT sooner than you think) but not necessarily the Sportster. My daughter, who's about 5' 6" and weighs about 130, owns a Night Train (Dyna), and loves it (and Harleys in general), but she will NOT get on a Sportster, because they make her nervous to ride (the high CG I mentioned)---she's always worried about dropping it at a light. Sorry if I've been overly blunt, but like Barbara said, it is SO worth it, and I'd really hate to see you spooked away from one of the greatest pastimes you'll ever enjoy.

EDIT: Almost forgot...dirt, even dirt roads, on a bike built for the pavement is generally a no-no...don't ask me how I know, lol...the tires tend to slide easily.

Last edited by Vonov : 05-25-2009 at 11:53 PM.
Vonov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2009, 10:06 AM   #13
trenttheuncatchable
Founding Member
 
trenttheuncatchable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 901
Default

Blu, what you really need to build your confidence is more experience riding. And you should do it on a smaller bike, like the Rebel or a copy of the 250 you learned on in class. You should also ride with an experienced rider (for moral support and just to watch over you), and start on backroads with very low traffic volumes.

When my gf and I ride, I always ride to the side and behind her (so she can see me in her rearview mirror), and she likes that because it feels like she has an escort and she won't be crowded by cars.
trenttheuncatchable is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2009, 06:13 PM   #14
Barbara
Super Moderator
 
Barbara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Skagit County, WA
Posts: 188
Default

Hi Blu,

Well, there ya go. As of now you have literally a world of people ready to help and to make certain that you feel good about riding! You know how a horse can tell when you are a newbie, or you are a little afraid of it? Well, a bike can be the same way. Call it a projection of the rider or whatever--the bike can smell fear!

So yeah--find a beater 250 of some kind and leather up, strap your helmet on tight and go ride. Carefully. On back roads. And there will soon come a time when you aren't thinking, "Jeez, I hope I don't drop this!" and instead you will be thinking, "Hmmm. I wish this thing had more power!" Then you will be ready for that Sporty.

But to start on a Sportster--wow! The guys are right--it's a big bike. I've put well over half a million miles on myself and used up probably the far side of 50 bikes, and a ride on my friend Renee's Sportster had me flying back to my 650 Yammie where I belong! So don't sell yourself short, just start out a bit smaller, that's all.

And with all of us waiting to hear how it goes and pulling for you, how can you fail?

Oh--your Ex left you a '60 Tintop? Wow. All I ever got was kids and debt......
__________________
Barb

Britney the BSA
Big John the BSA
Baby B. the BSA
Gemini the BSA/Triumph
Pip the Triumph T140v--(I have "Great Expectations")
The unnamed 1979 XS 650
Jaelith the '77 XS650/sidecar
Barbara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2009, 10:18 PM   #15
Wyldblu
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 12
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbara View Post
Hi Blu,

Well, there ya go. As of now you have literally a world of people ready to help and to make certain that you feel good about riding! You know how a horse can tell when you are a newbie, or you are a little afraid of it? Well, a bike can be the same way. Call it a projection of the rider or whatever--the bike can smell fear!

So yeah--find a beater 250 of some kind and leather up, strap your helmet on tight and go ride. Carefully. On back roads. And there will soon come a time when you aren't thinking, "Jeez, I hope I don't drop this!" and instead you will be thinking, "Hmmm. I wish this thing had more power!" Then you will be ready for that Sporty.

But to start on a Sportster--wow! The guys are right--it's a big bike. I've put well over half a million miles on myself and used up probably the far side of 50 bikes, and a ride on my friend Renee's Sportster had me flying back to my 650 Yammie where I belong! So don't sell yourself short, just start out a bit smaller, that's all.

And with all of us waiting to hear how it goes and pulling for you, how can you fail?

Oh--your Ex left you a '60 Tintop? Wow. All I ever got was kids and debt......
LMAO...no...he didn't leave it for me. We are great friends now that we are divorced. Still live in the same house...even met my fiance...don't ask me how uncomfortable THAT was. But we still live on the ranch together...have our own rooms of course, but he has his bike in his shop on the property, and mine is in the garage. He has been talking about getting me a little 250 to practice more on...but so far, he's just been TALKING about it. I think I would feel more comfortable with that for awhile. I LOVE my sporty..but right now I think I DO need a smaller bike to work my way up to it. What can I say...my fiance said, here's some money...go get a Harley. Who am I to argue?

-Blu-(thanking the biker world for great and honest comments!)
Wyldblu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2009, 02:42 AM   #16
Dr_Sprocket
Founding Member
 
Dr_Sprocket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Delmarva Peninsula
Posts: 2,331
Default

(+) 1 on what Vonov said. The Sporty has a high C of G. If you have the opportunity to go to a nice motorcycle show, where all of the main manufacturers have bikes, I think you'd be surprised.

We went to Timonium (MD) and I sat on almost every bike there (sport and cruiser) from all the major manufacturers and was amazed at how unbalanced the Sportster was. Many bikes, I could pull off the side-stand and control the bike with my knees (swaying side-to-side). The Sporty felt like it would just pull me over.

Go to a Honda dealer. Sit on a Rebel 250. You'd be amazed at how light and balanced that bike is! Learn on one of those, then consider upgrading or returning to the Sporty.
__________________
"Aid to the helpless indigent is civilized. Aid to the irresponsible is socially corrosive." ----- Schizuki (c. 2011)
Dr_Sprocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2009, 11:36 PM   #17
Wyldblu
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 12
Default

Well...I am gonna go look at a 250 Honda Rebel on Sat. Maybe it will help me get my confidence back. In any case....I am gonna ride it until I feel more secure on the bigger bike. Sigh...I thought this would come SO much easier!

-Blu-(on a long, strange trip...STILL)
Wyldblu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2009, 08:04 AM   #18
sarnali2
Aging Cafe` Racer

 
sarnali2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sittin' down by my window, lookin' at the rain.
Posts: 8,719
Default

Well as one DeadHead to another, just take your time. There's no rush... practice braking and stopping first off, the rest like good cornering and picking lines will come to you but you need to be able to stop first and foremost.
__________________
"Carpe` Throttelum -Loud Suits Save Lives"

"He said he's farting because of his medication"...
sarnali2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off