Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle Riding > Women Riders

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-24-2009, 03:12 PM   #31
seruzawa
The Toad

 
seruzawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: 8501 ft.
Posts: 17,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by equi_jumper View Post
Actually, most of the Harely dealers here in Missouri all have a ton of selection of Buells new & used A few of them have a ton of Buell blasts they collect from their beginner courses they offer, too.
Well, good for Missouri. There are 4 Harley dealers in northern Utah and only one carries Buells.
__________________
"Make no mistake, Communism lost a big argument - one we know today as the 20th century."
seruzawa is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 06-24-2009, 03:32 PM   #32
The_AirHawk
Founding Member
 
The_AirHawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Leanin' Tower O' P-P-P-P-POWAAAAAAAAA!!!!
Posts: 11,491
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by equi_jumper View Post
Actually, most of the Harely dealers here in Missouri all have a ton of selection of Buells new & used A few of them have a ton of Buell blasts they collect from their beginner courses they offer, too.
But they still treat 'em like Redhead Stepchildren - stick 'em off in a corner, or in a room that they stand racks of T-shirts and Do-rags around 'em. And the shoddy condition of "New" Demos is pathetic. Do they even F'n WASH them after offroad-muddin'? Or bother to stick a new tire on 'em when a tech takes one out and roasts the tire down to the cords?

Feh.
__________________
Parfois, on fait pas semblant
Sometimes, it's not pretend
Oderint Dum Metuant
Let them hate so long as they fear
политики предпочитают безоружных крестьян
Politicians Prefer Unarmed Peasants
Nothing to see here, Citizen. Move along now...
The_AirHawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2009, 08:29 PM   #33
DaisyMae
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Talking Passed MSF Class!

I took my MSF course last weekend - it was hot - and FUN! So much great information. I was so nervous but it went well and a learned a lot! I want to try to get out and practice, starting at the beginning getting to know my new bike although it is much heavier than the 250 I was on in class. I am really excited. After going through the class I find that I pretty much was doing everything wrong. If I find that I am having trouble with the Shadow I will ride my DH's 350 until I am comfortable with the mechanics. The "look, press, and roll" advice is just about the best. I was having trouble with the u/figure 8's until I just trusted the instructor and DID what he told me - which involved looking where I was turning - at the target, not at the lines, or anything else. . As weird as it felt at first, it worked!!! As I applied that to the other turns, they magically felt much better. Learning to ride slow, using the clutch in the friction zone, etc is also good advice and that is where I plan to start with the Shadow. Still wish I knew some female riders in my area.
DaisyMae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2009, 08:54 PM   #34
pushrod
Founding Member
 
pushrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Baja 'Bama
Posts: 3,642
Default

"Still wish I knew some female riders in my area."

And that would be where, DM? Out by the 'cement pond', maybe?

Congrats on your MSF success! You've only started to learn!
__________________
You would not understand,
this is not how I am...

I have become -
Comfortably Numb.
pushrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2009, 12:09 PM   #35
Vonov
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 14
Default

Hey, Wyldblu, how's it coming?

I think the main way the myth about the Sportster being a beginner's bike got started, was when dealers wanted to sell a bike to someone they knew wanted to buy a Harley, but that person (rightfully) wasn't sure about their skill level; since a Sporty was the smallest bike they sold, they pegged it as a "beginner's" bike. A more honest representation would have been to sell it as a beginning Harley rider's bike.

The same rationale would then be used to upsell that purchaser onto something bigger...and used by those same owners to justify to themselves the purchase of a "REAL" Harley...
Vonov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2009, 12:52 PM   #36
Takin'itSlow
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5
Default

I'm a new rider...I just completed the course in May...and prior to buying I did a lot of reading about different, smaller bikes. What I ended up with (and love) is my Kawasaki Vulcan 500. It has a low center of gravity...before the course I was practicing balancing on it in the garage and could take my feet right off the floor. It's light enough to pick up on my own...I know because I've dropped it. I didn't find the course easy, and my first few days of riding were more fear filled than fun; however I kept repeating the same route until I could relax and feel comfortable before moving on. Now I'm loving it!

One thing that was a big help was my first time venturing past the dead end street we live on into suburbia with stop signs and traffic was my husband followed me in his car. I thought I'd feel pressured by him being there, but it was actually comforting to have him "block" from behind. I also didn't have to worry about stalling in front of other traffic with him behind my. I'd read this on a website that had a whole starting to ride after the course program set up. I've also read all the books I can get my hands on, and seem to pick up helpful hints from them.

Another suggestion that was made to me was to just ride a little every day (or as often as possible) rather than spending longer once a week. The daily rides really helped me to build confidence without overdoing it and to become much more comfortable. And I still start every ride going to the dead end at the bottom of the street and riding around the double court to practice left and right circles.

I know I was really nervous to start with and couldn't leave the house without a knot in my stomach. Now I look forward to riding and mix up technical practice with fun rides. Oh...and another tip I've used is to cut tennis balls in half to make traffic cones which I take to an empty parking lot to practice the basics from the course. Like they told me on the course...practice, practice, practice.


Good luck!
Takin'itSlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2009, 12:52 PM   #37
DaisyMae
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Default

I like some of the things that you said TIS: I find that when I go for a few days between getting on I feel like I have regressed and have to get more comfortable again. I still have a knot in my stomach when I start, but that is ok. Still practicing on the 350 for the time being. I like the looks of the Kawisaki Vulcan 500. Nice. My husband also followed me the first time "on the road." It helped to have that buffer. How far are you riding daily?

Pushrod: My area is western Colorado. I know I have so much to learn . . .

Last edited by DaisyMae : 07-11-2009 at 12:56 PM.
DaisyMae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 05:41 PM   #38
Takin'itSlow
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5
Default

How far I ride depends on how much time I have, how I'm feeling, and the weather...we're having a pretty lousy summer here with frequent rain and high winds lately. As I do try to get out as often as possible, it might only be for five or ten kilometres. Yesterday was just over 63 kms for my second ride...I know that because I stopped for gas early as I've learned the hard way that I don't like running out of gas (thank goodness for the reserve!) I find I'm using the bike for errands now that I'm feeling more comfortable at parking lot speeds and able to pull in between other vehicles. I bought a DVD, "Ride Like a Pro," which is all slow riding exercises. It was worth every penny to get a grip on going real slow using the friction zone with some throttle and rear brake. I was amazed at how stable and upright the bike can be while only travelling at a few clicks. There's just so much to learn!
Takin'itSlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 11:09 AM   #39
taia_gen
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Default best thing I did to get confident

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyMae View Post
I am a new (but ancient) motorcycle rider. I have had a scooter. DH and I bought a Honda Shadow Spirit and I promptly dumped it . I got back on and I'll continue to get back on until I get it . . . and I will get it. I am taking a new rider class next week. I love Lil'Red's moto. I am going to keep that in mind. DH has an older Honda 350 and I may use that until I get more comfortable with some of the essentials, like braking, shifting and turning but it feels much different than the Shadow and I am actually more comfortable on the shadow. My question: what is the one piece of advice or something you did or practiced that made the difference for you as a new rider?

I got a used ninja 500 for my birthday a few years ago, and I had ZERO experince with bikes and was a bit scared to ride. One of the first things I was taught to get comfortable is this: start in neutral, shift into first and release the clutch slowly to coast forwards. Go just a little ways and grab the clutch again, stop and then shift into neutral. Do that over and over until you can pick up both your feet and put them back down at the proper times for starting and stopping. It might take a lot of practice to be able to sit on the bike without wobbling at a slow pace.. but it's a valuable skill to have!
Then, start out the same, and now shift into second. Grab the clutch again and stop. Shift down to first, then neutral while stopped. When you get that down, start shifting down into first while still moving slow, THEN grab the clutch and stop and shift to neutral.
Start all over and shift up and down into 3rd and back to neutral (it'd be helpful to have a long straight stretch so you CAN get up to 3rd or 4th or where ever you want to be!)

After you get the hang of the up and down shifting while moving on the straight-away, start back at the beginning (neutral-first, back to neutral) and do it on a corner, working your way up to the higher gears.

This really helped me get confident in my riding and develop a good sense of balance at the lower speeds.
I hope this helps!
taia_gen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2009, 09:24 AM   #40
Lisab4234
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1
Default Scared

Hi Blu,

I suggest that you take small/little trip daily (weather permitting) to the post office/local deli or somewhere else only 1-2miles at first. Do this when you know there isn't a lot of traffic on the road, till you feel comfortable ( in another words-not during commuter/school bus times) . Then try a little farther. Before you know it, you'll be amazed, your confidence will build up and you'll be able to ride further and further. Then call a friend for a short ride and go to lunch or something. Each time go a little farther. Try some shopping. Don't forget the tie downs.

Best of luck

LB
Lisab4234 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off