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Old 01-27-2011, 11:12 PM   #1
Trucku2
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Default '95 Thunderbird 900

I'm thinking about picking up a '95 Thunderbird, only 20,000 miles. I've never owned a Triumph. Is there anything that I need to be concerned about with this year/model ect ect. Thank you for any insight.

"Truck"
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Old 01-28-2011, 06:15 AM   #2
Morbo the Destroyer
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The bike was high-maintenance at inception, now at 16 years and 20k miles, it's going to require close attention to avoid getting dumped on the side of the road.

Is there a Triumph dealer in your area with a good reputation, or an independent shop that's known for servicing Triumphs? Of course a lot depends on the price, but if the seller is asking serious money, having a qualifed mechanic check the bike over for you is a good idea.
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Old 01-28-2011, 09:25 AM   #3
pushrod
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The earliest 'New' Triumph I have experience with is a '98 Thunderbird Sport. It belongs to a buddy. The 900 Triple is a nice motor. Not as 'good' as a 955i, but then I'm biased...

It seems to be the same as every other Hinckley bike I've been around; it's bulletproof.

Same as any other bike, when it gets some age on it, it'll need new rubber bits, like hoses, carb sleeves, tires, etc. The chrome Triumph uses is not the greatest, so expect pitting, regardless of how well-cared for the bike might be. I think mechanical parts are still readily available for the '95, but body and trim parts may be a challenge.

The engines are rather noisy, and the shifter is not as 'smooth' as some others.

What Morbo said is good; try to get the bike to a Triumph dealership, especially one that's had the brand for more than a few weeks. Tell us where you are, and we may be able to direct you to a Dealer.

The 'new' Triumph has nothing in common with the old bikes. So any 'history' you hear does not apply to the new ones.

Good luck! And, welcome to the site!
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Old 03-19-2011, 02:23 PM   #4
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Great bikes.

The big issue with the early ones was the sprag clutch.

I'd find out if the current owner has replaced it because it can be a pricey repair.

If that's been taken care of and the price is decent, I'd jump all over it.

@Pushrod: Of course the 955i is better. The 1050i is even better.

The 885 was 1st generation and 955i 2nd generation. Unfortunately Triumph didn't see fit to put the 955i or 1050i into a retro classic body.
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