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Old 07-12-2009, 02:16 PM   #1
maine_moonlight
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Smile Anyone here have a TU250X?

Hi there,

I was wondering if anyone here has a TU250X? Would love to hear about your experiences with this bike!
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Old 07-13-2009, 10:14 AM   #2
trenttheuncatchable
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The latest issue of Motorcycle Consumer News (mcnews.com) has a writeup and evaluation of this bike. They love it. The only caveats they mention are that it only has a top speed of 70-something mph, and it is no good for hauling a passenger. But it's light, easy to work on, gets good mpg's, has a really good front brake (though a weak drum rear brake) and is great in the twisties.
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Old 07-13-2009, 01:27 PM   #3
maine_moonlight
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Thank you! I am new to riding....the "weak rear drum brake" doesn't sound very good though....is this something to really be concerned with? Why make a motorcycle with a weak brake?
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Old 07-13-2009, 09:12 PM   #4
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Money. The rear brake is a rod-operated drum. Probably the same design used on a 1973 TS125.

Upgrading to a rear disc would increase the selling price. Rear drums are common on entry level and "budget" bikes.

If you are aware of it, it probably won't matter much. I doubt you'll be using it to "back it in" to turn 3 at the Springfield mile.
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Old 07-19-2009, 06:52 AM   #5
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I agree. The TU250 has a great front brake, no need to be concerned if you're aware of the bike's mild limitations. I'm going to get my wife one.
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Old 09-02-2009, 04:15 AM   #6
JapanesePower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maine_moonlight View Post
Hi there,

I was wondering if anyone here has a TU250X? Would love to hear about your experiences with this bike!
I bought one around early August, I think. It was only on the floor for two days when I snapped it up. After all fees, taxes, etc., the TU250X came to $4,100-ish. I put $500 cash down and traded in my 2006 DR-Z 400SM, which gave me 20,000 trouble-free miles (apart from a failed rectifier, and three very cheapo batteries over 3 years of all-weather riding).

At any rate, everyone thinks I restored it myself. It looks ace, shifts smoothy (if you don't rush your shifts), handles very nimbly, and my highest tank was 81.1mpg. I only have 524 miles on it as of tonight when I parked it. I will take it in for the first 600 mile service in 2 weeks or so (my commute to work is a mere 1.3 miles, part of the reason I bought the TU250X...I also own a 2007 Ninja 650R, with 12,000 all-weather trouble-free miles).

Overall, I love this little bike. the fit and finish is fantastic. The steel tube frame, chromed headlight casing, polished engine cases, pinstriped tank, metal (?) Suzuki "S" on the tank, and perfect thick metallic red/maroon paint all come together to create what I call a "premium small motorcycle." The throttle response is crisp, as it is fuel-injected. I weight 165 and you really have to spank it to get it above 70. The TU250X loves cruising happily at 50mph (the highest legal speed in-town I reside in), and the use of momentum is critical if you want to clip apexes and maintain your speed through turns. The stock cheapo tires don't feel so cheap. They stick very tightly, allowing a fair amount of lean (you will not drag the footpegs with these tires, though). The suspension is very compliant, with an emphasis on rider comfort, but the front forks don't really dive.

The brakes are inadequate, in my view. The front disk stops like a drum. You have to hammer the brakes to get this little guy to stop in a reasonable distance. It would appear this is where the budget got in the way of the parts supplied to this platform.

That said, it is very rewarding to ride, and vibration is a NON-ISSUE with this little single. The internal balancing is fantastic on this engine, I am still amazed at what the engineers at Suzuki have achieved with such a low MSRP. Based on the engine of the GZ250, this engine dates back to the early to mid 1980s, and it is bomb-proof, as a result. Any bugs in this design (if there ever were any...doubtful, it is a Suzuki) have long-since been stamped out. The addition of fuel-injection is a welcome change, though.

I really do wish they would cram the 650 Savage single into this chassis, and attach a chain drive. I would trade in this one for that!

My only mod was a set of clubman handlebars, and they look the part, let me tell you. There is a Power Commander kit for this bike...but what's the point? Gain 2hp?

Any questions, just let me know. A pleasure to meet you all.

Last edited by JapanesePower : 09-02-2009 at 04:28 AM.
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Old 09-02-2009, 06:41 AM   #7
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Why would you want a chain over a belt on a street bike?
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Old 09-02-2009, 06:50 AM   #8
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Probably just to get it to work with the 250 rear wheel.
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Old 09-02-2009, 02:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeU View Post
Why would you want a chain over a belt on a street bike?
Because belts have to be wide to transfer more hp to the wheel vs chain final drives.

Also belts waste more hp than chains...yes they require maintenance, but it's worth it. Plus, nothing on two wheels looks sexier than a clean chain...even better is four or more exhaust pipes coming out of the block.
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Old 09-02-2009, 02:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanesePower View Post
Because belts have to be wide to transfer more hp to the wheel vs chain final drives.

Also belts waste more hp than chains...yes they require maintenance, but it's worth it. Plus, nothing on two wheels looks sexier than a clean chain...even better is four or more exhaust pipes coming out of the block.

Modern belts aren't all that wide.

Why would they waste more power than a chain? The difference in power loss wouldn't be noticeable at all on the street. Belts last a hell of a lot longer too. Not to mention they are quieter and don't fling grease everywhere.

I can tell you're a sportbike guy or boring inline-4 kind of guy.
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