Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > Suzuki News

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-29-2003, 09:22 PM   #11
piinob
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 67
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

I bought a 750 Virago in 1982. Kept it for 8 years, and I did all my own maint. The Factory manual is a must. A good relationship with the guys at the shop doesn't hurt. If you are spending money there, they will talk to you and answer your questions. If you get some good info off the net, share it with them. I sold my bike in '90. It had 77k miles and no problems. It was still running strong in '95. Take your time, double check your work, keep good records.
piinob is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 07-30-2003, 05:45 AM   #12
electraglider_1997
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 640
Default NoKneeDown

I bought a mercury carb stic (~30 bucks) that allows for tuning 4 carbs at once. Mercury is reportably very toxic so you might opt for vacuum gauge carb synch of which I'm not sure of the cost. Anyway, the carb synch tool comes with directions and the shop manuals tell how to do it also. You just connect the vacuum tubes from the sychronizing tool to the vacuum ports on the intake manifolds. Then follow the directions in the shop manual. Before you take the time to synch the carbs you should adjust the valve clearance, adjust the cam chain and reset the pilot screws to get a little richer idle mixture. After do these things then synch. The pilot screws are usually under some plugs that you'll need to remove by drilling little holes, inserting a sheet metal screw and pulling out the plugs. Once you get at the pilot screws then you lightly screw in all the way until you bottom out (very lightly bottom out!). Then screw out exactly 3 complete 360 degree turns and this will give your idle a richer mixture. The Yamaha idles great since I did this and the carb synching. Good luck.
electraglider_1997 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 05:47 AM   #13
electraglider_1997
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 640
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

You can get a cycle stand at Sam's for under a 100 bucks.
electraglider_1997 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 06:50 AM   #14
seruzawa
The Toad

 
seruzawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: 8501 ft.
Posts: 17,461
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

There used to be online places where you could get substantial discounts for OEM engine/transmission parts. However I was looking today and found only a few places offering OEM parts and these were "cycle-parts.com" whose prices are only slightly lower and "bike-bandit" whose prices were higher than dealer prices.



Maybe someone has a link to a place where you can get decent discounts for OEM parts.
__________________
"Make no mistake, Communism lost a big argument - one we know today as the 20th century."
seruzawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 09:18 AM   #15
giuliom
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 128
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

TRy Zanotti Motors in Pennsylvania. They have a web site (it's either www.zanottimotors.com or www.zanottimotor.com). I got lots of OEM Yamaha parts for an older bike from them. Call them up and talk to John. Their prices were always discounted, great, fast service and they are knowledgeable. You will not talk to some desk jockey who has no idea what you are talking about.
giuliom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 11:07 AM   #16
NHBandit69
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 11
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

Six-point sockets are your friend. With few exceptions, a 1/2-inch socket wrench may not be. Become proficient in the use of anti-seize, loc-tite, and sealing compound for bolts; inserting bolts "dry" can be a very bad thing. You will be amazed at the difference anti-seize makes on the oil drain plug, for instance.



Always set aside more time than you think you'll possibly need the first time you try anything. Always have a second vehicle available for running to either the shop for parts or Sears for tools; avoiding the second trip and trying to make do with what you have will invariably make the first trip necessary - usually combined with the second stop on the way home anyway. That absolutely SUCKS when it's a cheap part you just destroyed, but it has a two-week delivery time, and it's not something your bike can live without (the aforementioned oil drain plug, for instance).
NHBandit69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 11:27 AM   #17
electraglider_1997
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 640
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

Their name "bike-bandit" says it all. Hiway robbery.
electraglider_1997 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 11:32 AM   #18
SmokeU
Registered Member
 
SmokeU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: pet****...pet****...pet****
Posts: 1,864
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

Sounds like you've had experience with the infamous drain plug
__________________
Pretending to be purple on the inside.
SmokeU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 01:43 PM   #19
NHBandit69
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 11
Default Re: Working on your own bike, things to know!

... on a 1981 XS1100 Special, no less. Hence the wait on the parts.



That experience encompassed most of the things I spewed about - 12-point socket damn near rounded the bolt off, 1/2-inch ratchet with a 12-point almost finished the job, hammering on the handle of the 1/2-inch ratchet DID finish the bolt off. Vise-Grips and hammer got the job done, but the bike sat there afterwards and I swear it was giving me a "you come near me with tools again and I'm high-siding your sorry ass as soon as the opportunity presents itself" look.



Now, using anti-seize, a six-point socket (whole set of 6-pointers was $109 on sale at Sears), and a 3/8-inch drive, the drain bolt backs right out with minimal effort.



My ZZR's first oil change could have been the same way, as the Kawasaki factory had the drain bolt torqued in almost unbelievably tight. I used patience, my 6-point, and VERY gently applied pressure with a 1/2-inch ratchet to loosen it. Reinstalled with anti-seize and the correct torque value per the owner's guide, and it came off easily at the 3000-mile oil change. Of course, that was only about two months later...
NHBandit69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 02:40 PM   #20
captainwhoopass
Founding Member
 
captainwhoopass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,670
Default Re: Extended Warranties Good For.....

The only real benefit from an extended warranty on a reliable bike comes when you sell it- you can usually get a little more money out of it if it is still under warranty.
__________________
<blockquote>
\"I knew it. I\'m surrounded by a$$holes.\" [b][i]Lord Helmet, Spaceballs
captainwhoopass is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off