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Old 01-07-2011, 06:21 AM   #11
Morbo the Destroyer
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I think they should disconnect the rear brake on MSF bikes until the last hour of the last day. Get the new riders focused on the front brake...
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:18 AM   #12
Easy Rider 2
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I seldomn use my rear brake at all.
I rode pretty much like that for a LOT of years......then saw a post from a guy talking about "trail braking" a few years ago.

I started playing with the rear brake to help make the transition into and out of corners smoother........and it works WONDERS after a little practice. It's not "real" trail braking but is close. It is especially helpful with moderating the throttle if you have one that's touchy.

In addition to that, I've seen MANY reports from new and seasoned riders alike who were in the habit of applying front first.......until they found out the hard way that front only will put you down in a flash in certain slippery conditions where the back applied first probably wouldn't.

P.S. My guess on Linked/ABS: With the appropriate amount of practice, it would be no worse than conventional brakes and would be better in some situations and worse in others. Being an "old fart" who doesn't have the physical dexterity I once had, I'm probably better off sticking with what I know.
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:22 PM   #13
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I've read on trail braking before & toyd with it a little & couldn't grasp the principle, so I just went back to my origional method. I'm not sure if I fully understand the process, and in potentially icy situations I do use more rear, but more commonly use none at all.
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:08 PM   #14
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I'm not sure if I fully understand the process, and in potentially icy situations I do use more rear, but more commonly use none at all.
Two things:

What I am talking about is just simply dragging the rear brake very slightly through a turn; a little more entering and then progressively less through and exiting. It allows for a smoother transition and also allows you to keep the rev's up just a bit more than if you adjusted your speed with throttle only.

And secondly, there is pretty much universal agreement among the "experts" that riding with front brake only is a BAD habit. Like I said, a small slick spot if hit by the front while braking with that wheel only, will upset your geometry so quickly that you won't be able to recover. IF you also had a good bit or rear brake in play, it's much less likely to happen......and if the back hits a spot like that, a little fish tail is fairly easy to recover from.

I too use front only.......but ONLY on very low speed stops in clear and dry conditions, after initially slowing with engine braking or front and rear both. I don't feel comfortable stopping without putting both feet down and that's easier to do if you finish up with front only.
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Old 01-08-2011, 08:24 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Easy Rider 2 View Post
Two things:

What I am talking about is just simply dragging the rear brake very slightly through a turn; a little more entering and then progressively less through and exiting. It allows for a smoother transition and also allows you to keep the rev's up just a bit more than if you adjusted your speed with throttle only.

And secondly, there is pretty much universal agreement among the "experts" that riding with front brake only is a BAD habit. Like I said, a small slick spot if hit by the front while braking with that wheel only, will upset your geometry so quickly that you won't be able to recover. IF you also had a good bit or rear brake in play, it's much less likely to happen......and if the back hits a spot like that, a little fish tail is fairly easy to recover from.

I too use front only.......but ONLY on very low speed stops in clear and dry conditions, after initially slowing with engine braking or front and rear both. I don't feel comfortable stopping without putting both feet down and that's easier to do if you finish up with front only.
Thanks for the feedback, I'll tinker with it again somemore when conditions are more favorable then the occasional dry, but gravel scattered roads.
I'm in a mountainous region and we have our share of twisties, the sport riders do this and talk of it frequently, mostly to keep the RPM's high to prepare for exiting I guess. I wasn's sure if it wsa practical to do on a 800+Lb bike like mine. Also the feet forward position on my ride is a bit exaggerated for me and I find I use the rear parts of the boards more then the center/front sections, in turn my foot isn't as ready to brake as it should be.
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Old 01-10-2011, 07:00 PM   #16
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Also the feet forward position on my ride is a bit exaggerated for me and I find I use the rear parts of the boards more then the center/front sections, in turn my foot isn't as ready to brake as it should be.
Can't help you with that part.
Having a 28" inseam myself, I suspect I would have that problem too.......if I had a bigger bike.

Always having my toe "cover" the back brake has saved my ass more than once.
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Old 01-11-2011, 06:32 AM   #17
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Also the feet forward position on my ride is a bit exaggerated for me and I find I use the rear parts of the boards more then the center/front sections, in turn my foot isn't as ready to brake as it should be.
That foot position is the single worst thing about most cruisers and choppers made. It's a completely unnatural orientation for good control, and is done strictly to create a style or appearance. When I had my Low Rider, HD guys were continually suggesting I add forward controls (it had standard peg/controls from the factory). I pointed out I had highway pegs...for the highway...and preferred to have my feet under me where they belong.
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Thomas Jefferson wrote that the 1st Amendment erected a "wall of separation" between the church and the state (James Madison said it "drew a line," but it is Jefferson's term that sticks with us today). The phrase is commonly thought to mean that the government should not establish, support, or otherwise involve itself in any religion.

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Old 05-29-2011, 10:58 PM   #18
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Default Prosthetic leg - bike modifications

I just read your post, and wondering what your buddy decided to do for modifications on the bike. I am right leg ATK, and am in the very situation right now. I'm veering toward the left heel brake (1997 Heritage Softail Springer) behind the left footboard, instead of a thumb brake. If so, could you please send a picture of either set-up? Thank you!

Erik
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Old 05-31-2011, 09:05 AM   #19
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Erik,

The 'project' never happened.

I think your left heel brake sounds like a good idea. However, if you can, maybe your right prosthesis would let you rig the right side that way.
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