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Old 04-19-2010, 03:48 PM   #1
BrentC
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Default Sprocket Question

Here's the skinny, I work part time and I am a student; therefore, NO BIG $$$$. I just replaced a brand new tire that I got a nail in.

I now have to replace the rear sprocket which is currently a aluminum Vortex with 46 teeth (OEM: 43 tooth, CBR F3). The chain still has plenty of life and the front sprocket is fine. I know that people say that the life of the new chainring will be diminished due to new parts with old, but I was planing on just going with a cheaper steal chain ring.
The basic questions are:
1. How many miles can I expect if I combine the new chain ring with the old chain and front sprocket?
2. How many miles should one expect if the entire drivetrain is new?

Thanks everyone.
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:33 PM   #2
BrentC
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Default Next pondery

If I did go the inexpensive route and get a steel chain ring and keep the old drivetrain, I would have to go with a 45 tooth chain ring. I could not find a 46 in steel.
Question: How many links would I have to take out?
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:58 PM   #3
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One tooth should be in range of your adjusters. Mileage is a big variable, depends how / what you ride, how you ride it and if you like chain lube or believe its a myth. If the front isnt too bad you should be fine.
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Old 04-20-2010, 05:39 AM   #4
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It's hard to estimate someone else's chain life, as 12er noted. Best guess with new rear sprocket and good lube; maybe 10k miles. That's conservative. Just check it every time you lube it. Try to pull the chain away from the rearmost part of the rear sprocket. If it moves out from the sprocket, time to change it. Also roll the chain through with the rear wheel off the ground. Check for binding links, out of alignment, etc.
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Old 08-26-2011, 07:22 AM   #5
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Default Is this chain and or sprocket worn out?

Need advice as to whether this chain can be saved with cleaning or not. Sprockets look decent to me but I'm new so i may not know exactly what I'm looking at.

Thanks for the help.

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Old 08-26-2011, 07:29 AM   #6
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Advice would be much appreciated. Also I hate to start the whole chain debate but do they sell kerosene at the autoshops?
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:06 AM   #7
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I can't tell much from the pictures, but the sprocket looks okay.

Your best bet would be to find a shop that sells the "Grunge Brush." Or order it off Amazon.

It is an excellent tool, and it comes with a bottle of 'cleaner.' Failing that, get some clean mineral spirits and an old toothbrush.

And plenty of newspaper to keep the floor from getting seriously dirty.

Note: This whole process is a LOT easier if you can elevate the rear tire off the ground.

When you've given the chain a good scrub, then go after the rust with a non-steel metal brush (brass or stainless steel).

If you can, take off the front sprocket cover (assuming there is one) and clean the yuck out of there.

Clean the top of the swingarm and the rub strip. Use the 'steel' brush.

FWIW, I use WD-40 to cut the 'yuck'.

You might want to soak a couple paper towels with the WD-40 and clean the wheel.

Don't spray the tire or the brake rotor.

Using some dry paper towels, wipe up all remaining yuck and solvent. Rotate the rear wheel a couple times to get as much off the sprockets as you can. You won't get all of it.

While you rotate the wheel, look for 'kinks' in the chain. Those will indicate failed or about-to-fail links. Also look for tight and loose sections. Those can be harder to see.

My vote for lube is the Dupont Dry Film Lubricant (Blue can, not Orange), available at Lowes.

After you lube it, take the bike for a ride of a couple miles, and back to the house. Check the chain tension and adjust if necessary.

Hope this helps!
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:13 AM   #8
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The rust doesn't look good. Is it an OEM? Does it have any "kinks" or sticky rollers (after cleaning, that is). Just a bit of WD-40 and an old toothbrush will work about as well as kerosene.

Common wisdom is to not put a new chain on old sprockets, and vice-versa. However, the manufacturer(s) technically say "worn" and not "used" - how worn the cogs are really cannot be seen in pics without a comparison-sample, and it's pretty hard then too. It's also a judgement-call, when you only have a small amount of wear. I've done both of the above-outlined, with no adverse effects.

Others disagree.

Teh Edetz:
I heartily concur with pushrod about the DuPont lube. It's the shiznizlit....
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Old 08-26-2011, 09:54 AM   #9
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It's an Oem chain from a bike I'm considering buying. Overall the bike looks decent but the chain definitely stuck out when I was looking the bike over. I'm going back for a test ride soon so this could be another price negotiation point.

Pushrod the process sounds extensive but well worth it. I didn't know wd-40 could be used on wheels as well.

Thanks Airhawk it's an oem chain with about 7000 miles on it. There are as many oil chain lubes as there are motor oils. Makes my head spin.
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Old 08-26-2011, 10:55 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cloud9 View Post
Advice would be much appreciated. Also I hate to start the whole chain debate but do they sell kerosene at the autoshops?
As was said, can't really tell much from pictures but..........
Rust does NOT equal wear. A lot of people fall into that trap.
If it looks like the rollers have some lube on them and little or no rust, I'd clean it up and forge ahead. At 7K miles it should NOT be worn out.

By "clean it up", I do NOT mean polish it shinny clean. Just wipe thoroughly with a small rag satruated in WD or mineral spirits and then wipe off with another rag. In my opinion, you really gain nothing useful by cleaning a chain too much.

Mineral spirits is basically kero without the smell; available in any paint department.

I agree that the "real" Dupont Teflon stuff is good but I can't help but wonder if it might not be a good idea to stick with 90W if it looks like that's what was on there before.
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