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Old 03-01-2010, 12:44 PM   #11
sarnali2
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HEEEEEEEEEYYYYYY JMDONALD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Whats that insignia you use "From Sea From Land"? I assume it's a Marine emblem of some kind...England? Canada maybe?.....looks pretty cool !
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Old 03-01-2010, 12:48 PM   #12
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A little extra data that I've learned over the years. I worked on PBR type boats in Nam, later in the fleet and was sent to Navy school. I also have to screw with batteries at my cabin which is entirely powered with a solar/battery system. First off no matter all the hype the old-fashioned wet cell batteries, if you get a quality one, will have greater life than the sealed ones and especially the gel batteries. The new AGM type batteries show greater promise and work especially well in deep cycle types and possibly are better than the old style wet cell.

If the battery charge goes low it sulfates much much more rapidly. If a battery is ever allowed to go dead it may never recover and will fail completely much more quickly than one that's always been kept near full charge. This can occur virtually overnight.

Now, all batteries are not created equal and a poor quality wet cell will not perform as well as a high quality gel type. Look for the longest warranty.

Batteries tend to die more quickly in hot ambient temperatures, like in Florida or Danang. (There may be less gunfire in Danang than Florida these days, but that's another subject altogether.) In cold temperatures the batteries perform less well. You can figure the effective capacity of a battery to increase/decrease about 10% for every 10 degrees F change. So if you live in a cold climate a battery with a larger amp-hour rating is beneficial. In hot temperatures the battery will sulfate more quickly and have a lower lifetime. Don't get me started about changing 90lb 6V marine batteries (2 banks of 4 each) in a 3x3x6 crawl space behind the coxswain's cabin in a black painted gunboat in July in Nam. Those danged things had a lifetime of about 6 months. That's 8 batteries per boat x 10 boats. you had to pull the first three to get the fourth one if it was dead.... grumble grumble... all the while it's 140 freaking degrees.... all for $200 per month including combat pay... grumble grumble. At least the dope was cheap.

Anyhow back to batteries. I hope this helps a bit. Buy the best quality largest amp/hour capacity battery you can find that will fit in the space provided. If you live in a hot climate expect the battery to fail on exactly the date that the warranty expires. They figure these things pretty well.

You COULD, if you were dedicated enough, extend your battery life by pulling it out of the bike and putting it in the refrigerator whenever you aren't riding as that would slow the sulfation. That's probably too much trouble though.

I bought a scooter for my wife last year from a guy who had just installed a new 12 month battery. It died at almost exactly 13 months. A 36 month battery is only twice as much as the 12.

We own motorcycles. They are impractical and expensive in many ways. You don't skimp on tires do you? Don't cheap out on batteries either. It's false economy.
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Old 03-01-2010, 01:00 PM   #13
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I bought a scooter for my wife last year from a guy who had just installed a new 12 month battery. It died at almost exactly 13 months. A 36 month battery is only twice as much as the 12.

We own motorcycles. They are impractical and expensive in many ways. You don't skimp on tires do you? Don't cheap out on batteries either. It's false economy.
I pretty much always go with OEM. My brother, a master Mercedes tech, always buys Interstate. They are crazy expensive (perhaps not that much more than a H-D battery). Does anyone recommend any brand over any other (Yuasa, Interstate, H-D, etc.)?
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Old 03-01-2010, 01:05 PM   #14
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I pretty much always go with OEM. My brother, a master Mercedes tech, always buys Interstate. They are crazy expensive (perhaps not that much more than a H-D battery). Does anyone recommend any brand over any other (Yuasa, Interstate, H-D, etc.)?
I haven't bothered to check it out but I'll bet you that all the motorcycle batteries in the world are made by 2 or three companies. They just put different labels on them. That 36 month Autozone battery might be the same one that's in the Harley.
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Old 03-01-2010, 01:16 PM   #15
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I haven't bothered to check it out but I'll bet you that all the motorcycle batteries in the world are made by 2 or three companies. They just put different labels on them. That 36 month Autozone battery might be the same one that's in the Harley.
Wow. You learn something new every day. Thanks for the input!
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Old 03-01-2010, 03:28 PM   #16
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HEEEEEEEEEYYYYYY JMDONALD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Whats that insignia you use "From Sea From Land"? I assume it's a Marine emblem of some kind...England? Canada maybe?.....looks pretty cool !
It's the Clan Donald insignia. There is no Joy without Clan Donald. Scotland.
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Old 03-02-2010, 06:42 AM   #17
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I pretty much always go with OEM. My brother, a master Mercedes tech, always buys Interstate. They are crazy expensive (perhaps not that much more than a H-D battery). Does anyone recommend any brand over any other (Yuasa, Interstate, H-D, etc.)?
It seems that Interstate and Yuasa are the big guys in 'normal batteries', and Westco, Odyssey and Optima are the 'hi-tech' guys.

Of course, YRMV.

IIRC, the HD batteries were Yuasas.

One to actively avoid is the Walmart 'Neverstart' brand.
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Old 03-02-2010, 07:06 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by seruzawa View Post
A little extra data that I've learned over the years. I worked on PBR type boats in Nam, later in the fleet and was sent to Navy school. I also have to screw with batteries at my cabin which is entirely powered with a solar/battery system. First off no matter all the hype the old-fashioned wet cell batteries, if you get a quality one, will have greater life than the sealed ones and especially the gel batteries. The new AGM type batteries show greater promise and work especially well in deep cycle types and possibly are better than the old style wet cell.

If the battery charge goes low it sulfates much much more rapidly. If a battery is ever allowed to go dead it may never recover and will fail completely much more quickly than one that's always been kept near full charge. This can occur virtually overnight.

Now, all batteries are not created equal and a poor quality wet cell will not perform as well as a high quality gel type. Look for the longest warranty.

Batteries tend to die more quickly in hot ambient temperatures, like in Florida or Danang. (There may be less gunfire in Danang than Florida these days, but that's another subject altogether.) In cold temperatures the batteries perform less well. You can figure the effective capacity of a battery to increase/decrease about 10% for every 10 degrees F change. So if you live in a cold climate a battery with a larger amp-hour rating is beneficial. In hot temperatures the battery will sulfate more quickly and have a lower lifetime. Don't get me started about changing 90lb 6V marine batteries (2 banks of 4 each) in a 3x3x6 crawl space behind the coxswain's cabin in a black painted gunboat in July in Nam. Those danged things had a lifetime of about 6 months. That's 8 batteries per boat x 10 boats. you had to pull the first three to get the fourth one if it was dead.... grumble grumble... all the while it's 140 freaking degrees.... all for $200 per month including combat pay... grumble grumble. At least the dope was cheap.

Anyhow back to batteries. I hope this helps a bit. Buy the best quality largest amp/hour capacity battery you can find that will fit in the space provided. If you live in a hot climate expect the battery to fail on exactly the date that the warranty expires. They figure these things pretty well.

You COULD, if you were dedicated enough, extend your battery life by pulling it out of the bike and putting it in the refrigerator whenever you aren't riding as that would slow the sulfation. That's probably too much trouble though.

I bought a scooter for my wife last year from a guy who had just installed a new 12 month battery. It died at almost exactly 13 months. A 36 month battery is only twice as much as the 12.

We own motorcycles. They are impractical and expensive in many ways. You don't skimp on tires do you? Don't cheap out on batteries either. It's false economy.
WOW lotsa good intel there, thanks for sharing.
I'm curious why more manufacturers diddnt stay with the "historic" side mount, easy change, away from engine heat, attractive flat chrome side cover, and instead have gone to under the seat harder to get to, cross braces blocking it in location of the last 20 years.
My sisters intruder battery location in down low in front of the rear tire, nice to have that weight low and away from engine heat, but the trap door to drop it out the bottom hits the ground requiring parking the back wheel on a plank to get the height needed to remove it, and lots of debris gets thrown all over it, (wet or dry).
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Old 03-02-2010, 01:57 PM   #19
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WOW lotsa good intel there, thanks for sharing.
I'm curious why more manufacturers diddnt stay with the "historic" side mount, easy change, away from engine heat, attractive flat chrome side cover, and instead have gone to under the seat harder to get to, cross braces blocking it in location of the last 20 years.
My sisters intruder battery location in down low in front of the rear tire, nice to have that weight low and away from engine heat, but the trap door to drop it out the bottom hits the ground requiring parking the back wheel on a plank to get the height needed to remove it, and lots of debris gets thrown all over it, (wet or dry).
Wow. My Buell Uly has a super easy access. Just pop the seat, undo a rubber bungee thingy, unbolt the battery and ... voila! I guess that Erik really knew what he was doing, afterall.
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Old 03-02-2010, 05:56 PM   #20
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My Rebel was easy side door, the Vulcan was under seat then there was a cross brace that had be removed. The Deluxe is under seat too, but its a 3 bolt (aftermarket 1 piece heated wih wiring harness) seat and also a cross brace over it. Either bike you can charge or jump, just removal was more complicated. I like the location I described on the Intruder, weight low & it's away from the heat, but the debris has to take a toll on it over time. The terminal boots werent anything to get excited about, and had the bike not been 15+ years old, the suspension height may have allowed the trap door to clear the ground.
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